Parx How To Make A March Madness Bracket

How to make a custom March Madness bracket?

FAQ –

What is march madness bracket maker? March Madness bracket maker is a tool that allows people to create tournament brackets for the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament, also known as March Madness. The bracket maker allows users to customize their brackets by selecting teams, setting the number of competitors, and other options. The bracket maker also provides a visual representation of the tournament structure, making it easier for users to make decisions and track their progress. Who is required to file march madness bracket maker? Anyone can create a March Madness bracket maker, but it is not required by any organization or governing body. How to fill out march madness bracket maker? 1. Choose your bracket type. Before you fill out your bracket, you need to decide what type of bracket you want to use. There are several popular types of brackets, including Standard, Seeds, and Squares. Once you decide which type of bracket you want to use, you can move on to the next step.2. Make your picks. Once you have selected the type of bracket you want to use, you can start making your picks. For each game, you will need to pick a winner. If you are using a standard bracket, you can pick the team you think will win each matchup. If you are using a seeded bracket, you will need to pick the team with the higher seed in each matchup. If you are using a squares bracket, you will need to pick the winner of each square on the bracket.3. Submit your bracket. Once you have completed your bracket, you will need to submit it to the March Madness bracket maker. You can submit your bracket online, or you can print it out and submit it by mail. Once your bracket is submitted, you will be able to track your progress and see how your picks fare against the rest of the competition. What is the purpose of march madness bracket maker? The purpose of a March Madness bracket maker is to create a visual representation of the NCAA basketball tournament, also known as March Madness. It allows users to make predictions of the tournament’s outcome and track the results of each game. The bracket maker is also used to see the odds of each team and compare the different matchups. What information must be reported on march madness bracket maker? 1. Team names 2. Tournament seedings 3. Team records 4. Team strengths and weaknesses 5. Game scores 6. Final tournament scores 7. Bracket picks 8. Round-by-round results 9. Final bracket standings 10. Win/Loss records for each team When is the deadline to file march madness bracket maker in 2023? The exact deadline for the 2023 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament is not yet known. The tournament typically starts in mid-March each year, so the deadline to submit a bracket should be sometime in late February or early March of that year. What is the penalty for the late filing of march madness bracket maker? There is no penalty for late filing of a March Madness bracket. The deadline to submit a bracket is typically in mid-March and the tournament usually runs through the first week of April. It is a purely voluntary activity with no penalty for late filing.

Where do I make my March Madness bracket?

3. NCAA.com – NCAA.com is the website of the governing body that hosts March Madness. Accordingly, the site hosts the official March Madness Bracket Challenge of the NCAA, The NCAA.com bracket contest is called the Capital One NCAA March Madness Bracket Challenge, and it is notable for being the only contest that allows you to watch live game footage directly from your bracket page.

Like other sites, NCAA.com features groups for running pools, as well as a matchup analysis tool to help you make predictions. To fill out your bracket, go to the Capital One NCAA March Madness Bracket Challenge website or app and click “Join Now.” You will be able to create a profile and fill out your bracket.

NCAA.com is also the official source for blank, printable March Madness brackets, which they offer in PDF format. You can fill out your bracket on NCAA.com here.

Can I fill out a bracket online?

How do I get a bracket? – You can fill out a bracket virtually through NCAA.com’s Official Bracket Challenge. Sign up for free, if you haven’t already done so, and start picking a winner for every matchup! You can print a bracket here and fill it out by hand, too,

Are any brackets still perfect?

There are no perfect ESPN brackets remaining.

Are there any perfect brackets?

Surprising Fact – There has never been a verified perfect March Madness bracket. The closest anyone has ever advanced in the tournament with a perfect one came in 2019, when an Ohio resident made it into the Sweet 16, but had their bracket busted with 18 games left to be played.

What is the bracket app?

THE #1 BRACKET TOURNAMENT MANAGER ON THE APP STORE Build your own tournaments. Make custom brackets. Track, save and share your results. Tired of writing out tournament brackets by hand? My Bracket is the app you are looking for. Loaded with features yet easy to use, it is the best way to manage tournaments on the fly.

Keep yourself organized and your friends informed with My Bracket. ◆ INTUITIVE, EASY TO USE BRACKET CREATOR helps you track all your tournaments ◆ BUILD THE TOURNAMENT YOU WANT with a truckload of features ◆ TRACK WINS AND LOSSES WITH A SINGLE TAP and share the results with your friends ◆ UNMATCHED SOCIAL SHARING ABILITY keeps everyone informed and involved in your tournament Try it today for free – if you like it, the fully loaded pro version is just a click away.

PRO FEATURES • build unlimited brackets for any number of teams (up to 32) • automatic bye round management • double elimination with integrated “Losers’ Bracket” • automatic seeding management • seed randomization if needed • ‘Groups’ menu keeps your brackets organized • highly manipulatable brackets let you fix or change any or all advancements quickly • Smart Edit remembers your team names if you need to adjust team numbers • beautiful HD graphics make your brackets look great SOCIAL FEATURES • multiple bracket sharing allows you to share UNLIMITED brackets at one time • share one or more brackets with a single click via email or Facebook • save one or more brackets to your phone as images you can text out to anyone • REVOLUTIONARY new import/export feature allows you to send WORKING brackets to other My Bracket users If you are organizing tournaments for pool, tennis, ping pong, darts, basketball, volleyball, softball, baseball, soccer, curling, squash, you name it – this app is for you.

  • My Bracket is built to be social.
  • It is the ONLY app that allows you to share your brackets with anyone you want, any way you want.
  • It is designed to make your life easier.
  • TRY IT TODAY, FOR FREE.
  • The free version includes all of the great features listed above for brackets up to 8 teams.
  • Unlock the pro version with a single click within the app.

Subscription pricing and terms: My Bracket offers three auto-renewing subscription options: $5.99 per week $12.99 per month $39.99 per year These prices are for United States customers. Pricing in other countries may vary and actual charges may be converted to your local currency depending on the country of residence.

Is ESPN bracket challenge free?

No perfect brackets remain in both men’s and women’s Tournament Challenge New opportunity to win $2,000 Grand Prizes, Amazon Gift Cards Fans can submit brackets until Thursday, March 23, 6:30 p.m. ET

Through the first weekend of tournament play, no perfect brackets remain in either men’s or women’s ESPN Tournament Challenge games.

In the women’s tournament, No.1 Stanford’s loss to No.8 Ole Miss in the second round of the Seattle 4 Region last night eliminated the one remaining perfect bracket. For the third year in a row, the last perfect men’s bracket was knocked out in the First Round when 16 Fairleigh Dickinson took down No.1 Purdue in the East Region on Friday night.

Yes, there is a Second Chance! When it comes to ESPN Tournament Challenge no one is perfect, literally. But if you’re sore about the non-basketball fan in your group who’s now in 1st place after blindly picking schools starting with “F” – Fairleigh Dickinson, Furman, Florida Atlantic – we’ve got you covered.

Fans can submit Second Chance brackets until Thursday, March 23, at about 6:30 p.m. ET, when No.3 Kansas State meets No.7 Michigan State in the first game of the Sweet 16. Similar to the regular ESPN Tournament Challenge, fans who pick the National Champion will be automatically entered into a random drawing to win one of 10 Grand Prizes of $2,000 each, Also, in celebration of the 25th Anniversary of the Men’s Tournament Challenge, fans who fill out and complete 25 Second Chance brackets will have an opportunity to win one of 25 randomly drawn Amazon Gift Cards for $200,

Fans can complete and submit Second Chance brackets on the ESPN Tournament Challenge App, ESPN Fantasy App, ESPN App, or on ESPN.com. Like all ESPN Fantasy games, Tournament Challenge Second Chance is free to play. Tournament Coverage Across ESPN Platforms In addition to all of the information and features of ESPN’s Tournament Challenge game, as well as exclusive coverage of the entire women’s tournament on ESPN platforms, fans can access comprehensive coverage of the men’s and women’s tournaments including scores, news, analysis, and feature stories on ESPN.com and the ESPN App.

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Is there a March Madness app?

‎NCAA March Madness Live Watch College Basketball GamesGet ready for March Madness Live on the Official App of the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament.Watch NCAA Men’s live college basketball games, highlights, in-depth analyses, classic games and more on demand with NCAA March Madness Live.

You’ll get access to exclusive NCAA March Madness content as you prepare for the Selection Show on March 12 at 6PM ET on CBS. Keep up with every NCAA March Madness game. College basketball games are just a tap away – watch NCAA Men’s basketball games live on your Apple device starting March 14. Enjoy 3 hours of free preview for games on TBS, TNT, and TruTV, and unlimited free viewing on CBS!Compete in the Capital One NCAA March Madness Men’s Bracket Challenge – use the bracket creator and lock in your brackets before March 16th to play.After Selection Sunday, tune in and stream your picks’ games as they happen; keep up with live college basketball scores and watch highlights at any time.

Get personalized bracket alerts and daily results, stream NCAA Men’s basketball games and find out how you rank.With NCAA March Madness Live, you’ll never miss a game-changing moment. Follow all the latest in NCAA Men’s basketball scores and updates.Download NCAA March Madness Live today!= NCAA March Madness Live Features =Stream Live Men’s NCAA Basketball Games:• Watch DI Men’s Basketball Championship live and catch all 67 games across CBS, TBS, TNT, and truTV starting March 14 on your Apple devices• Log in with your TV provider after the free 3-hour preview ends to continue watching (paid TV subscription required for games broadcast on TBS, TNT, and truTV; CBS games do not require a paid TV subscription)• Live games and video are only available in the US, its Territories and Bermuda• AirPlay or Cast live basketball games and VOD to your TVWatch March Madness Fast Break:• Catch all the biggest basketball moments from the first and second rounds• Watch live college basketball games with all-around coverage• Get exclusive live look-ins at the biggest basketball games• Watch March Madness highlights instantly• Live college basketball game commentary & analysis throughout March MadnessNever Miss a Moment:• Listen to live radio broadcasts for all 67 games – now available on CarPlay• Watch March Madness Live exclusive VOD content – classic games, in-depth analysis, highlights, and behind-the-scenes features• Live March Madness Live basketball game notifications for upsets, overtime games, close games, and your favorite college basketball teams• NCAA basketball scores tab gives you current scores, stats, and the Official BracketPlay the Capital One NCAA March Madness Men’s Bracket Challenge:• Fill out your brackets by March 16 to play with millions of other fans like you• Challenge your friends & family in public and private groups• Use Matchup Analysis to get an edge when filling out your bracket• Compete against celebrities to see who has the best bracket• Get personalized bracket alerts• View your picks right from the Home tabPlay the NCAA March Madness Men’s Tournament Run:• Select teams at the start of the tournament while staying under your budget• Your teams gain value when they win, getting more points for beating better teams• Buy & sell teams between after every game• Compete with friends & family in public and private groups• Climb the NCAA Tournament Run leaderboards!Watch on Apple TV:• Live stream games on Apple TV after games start on March 14• Use your device to stream two games at once with Multigame• Register your college basketball tournament bracket on mobile and watch your picks play on TV• Watch DI Men’s Basketball Championship games & on demand content any time *Use the mobile tournament bracket maker, enter the Capital One NCAA March Madness Men’s Bracket Challenge, watch live games and follow every development in the tournament – download NCAA March Madness Live to experience all things March Madness! Mar 20, 2023 Version 13.2.3 This version contains bug fixes in Game Center.

Out of all the many places I get my sports content, this might be the best for what it does. It’s very, very easy to stream games live, and if you didn’t catch the game, they do have the condensed version of the game and highlights to watch to keep yourself up to date. There’s also game previews for upcoming games, loads of stats, articles, and videos about a variety of March Madness topics, and just a really streamlined and convenient user experience overall.

My one request is for the ability to keep the live stream of the game going after you exit the app, as is possible when I stream with the ESPN or NBA apps. If this had that, it would be perfect. One that I always make sure to download the second week of March for every edition of the tourney.

I love that the app is here. I love March madness. It seems though the details get worse and worse every year especially using products in the AppleEco system. Digital transitions when using AirPods are pretty bad. Pull an AirPod out and you’re more than likely going to have to watch yet another C.O. Credit card commercial with its sub par repetitive humor.

Push the audio to you HomePod an lose the video on your phone. Plug your Mac to an extended big screen, it’s likely to freeze and ask for a restart of the video. One game ends and it’s ready to switch you to the next feed, in 3, 2, 1 video feed problem please restart.

  • I don’t think I’ve seen that transition work one time this tourney.
  • I’m here for it.
  • It’s a good interface overall.
  • I’m pro-March madness app.
  • I love the push notifications (unless I’m behind for some reason).
  • I’m gonna download it and use it every year.
  • I’m just not going to trust it enough to make any normally easy digital transitions that any app should be able to make with ease, especially in the big moments of a game.

Hello! Thank you for being a fan, and thank you for your honest feedback. We apologize for the inconvenience you have experienced. We are actively addressing the AirPod issue you mentioned, along with some other improvements. We do hope we can change your mind as we continue to better the app and the overall fan experience.

Enjoy the rest of the tournament! No one will ever read this but the amount of ads you have to watch is infuriating, specifically whenever you start streaming a game they make you watch an ad to even get to the game whether they’re in a timeout or not and because of the number of bugs there are sometimes it just kicks you off a game and then you click it again and you have to watch another ad to start watching again it’s maddening.

Like you pay how ever much to even get a tv provider so you can watch all the games and then you get over 50% of your watch time is ads to begin with and then they force you to watch an ad to even start streaming every time. It would be somewhat bearable if there were less tv timeouts, no ad at the beginning of any time you want to stream and less bugs.

  1. It also seems like they require more bandwidth to stream video than other apps, like even with fast internet you get a “connection strength not good enough to play video” message so often it’s so annoying.
  2. Please get your act together if you’re a multi billion dollar company that doesn’t even pay its athletes.

Just sad The developer, NCAA Digital, indicated that the app’s privacy practices may include handling of data as described below. For more information, see the, The following data may be used to track you across apps and websites owned by other companies: The following data may be collected and linked to your identity: The following data may be collected but it is not linked to your identity:

Location Identifiers Usage Data Diagnostics

Privacy practices may vary, for example, based on the features you use or your age. : ‎NCAA March Madness Live

How do I fill out my bracket?

Picking Your College Basketball Bracket – In a March Madness bracket pool, you try to correctly predict the winner of each game in the tournament. You start filling out your bracket by picking the teams you think will win each first round game. From there, you then pick the winners from all the games in your theoretical second round lineup.

  1. You repeat this process all the way through the final game.
  2. Once the tournament begins, you can’t change any of your picks.
  3. Most bracket pools and contests use a system of awarding points for each correct prediction (i.e.
  4. Points for each team that you pick to advance to a certain round that actually makes it to that round).

The points increase with each round. Picking three of the Final Four teams, for example, yields more points than picking three of the Elite 8 teams. The player with the most points at the end of the tournament wins the pool. Seems simple right? Well there’s a reason the tournament is called March Madness, and you can count on more than a few upsets to happen along the way.

You could fill out your bracket picking mostly top seeds to advance in the first round, and have your bracket busted before the first weekend of the tournament is even over. Even astute fans with high-level basketball knowledge can end up with a hopeless bracket when upset after upset unfolds in round one.

Let’s take a look at some things to consider when completing your own brackets:

How many people fill out brackets?

Approximately 60 to 100 million brackets are filled out each season. It’s nearly impossible to fill out a perfect bracket, especially with all the upsets that occur in the tournament every year.

What is {} bracket called?

Generally, three kinds of brackets are used in mathematics, Parentheses or Round Brackets, ( ) Curly or Brace Brackets Square or Box Brackets

Can you make a tournament bracket in Excel?

Below you will find our Excel Tournament Brackets for Single Elimination, Double Elimination, and 3 Game Guarantee. Once you have downloaded the bracket you need, you will be able to directly type in team names, dates, times, and locations of games. You will also be able to fill in the bracket as the teams advance through the tournament.

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How many March Madness brackets can you make?

Every year, millions of people fill out a bracket for the NCAA tournament. If you’re like us, you hear that little voice saying, “What if I became the first person ever to fill out a perfect bracket? This could be the year!” That little voice knows one thing: No one has gotten a verifiably perfect bracket in the history of the NCAA tournament.

But it also has one thing very wrong: This will not be the year. And neither will next year, or any in the next millennium. BRACKETS: Print the official March Madness bracket Yes, it is technically possible, and even absurdly overwhelming odds don’t mean it couldn’t theoretically happen this year. But we’re pretty confident in saying that it won’t.

How crazy small is the chance? Here’s the TL/DR version of the odds of a perfect NCAA bracket:

1 in 9,223,372,036,854,775,808 (if you just guess or flip a coin) 1 in 120.2 billion (if you know a little something about basketball)

Your chances will increase with more knowledge of the current teams, the tournament’s history, and an understanding of the sport itself. For instance, before UMBC’s historic upset of Virginia last year, it was practically a guarantee that all four 1 seeds would win their matchups (they’re still 135 for 136 through the modern tournament’s history), giving you four automatically correct games to start off with.

But that type of knowledge is near impossible to quantify or accurately factor into an equation. We’ll get to advanced calculations that attempt to take knowledge into account later on, but to get a better understanding, let’s first look at the most basic calculation. What are your odds if you had a perfect 50-50 chance of guessing every game correctly? Well that would depend on the number of total possible bracket permutations for the tournament.

So how do we calculate this? We’ll look at a small sample bracket first. Like the NCAA tournament, our sample bracket will be a single-elimination tournament, but it will feature just four teams. Let’s fill out all of the possible outcomes for that tournament’s bracket: That gives us eight bracket permutations. For a small field of just four, that’s easy to sketch out. But even if we just double the field to eight teams, the results are daunting. With eight teams, we go from eight bracket permutations to 128: That’s the fun thing about exponents: they increase exponentially. (And for those of you who are so bored you wanted to zoom in on each of those 128 brackets, no we didn’t take the time to actually fill out each one correctly. That would take too long.

That’s kinda the point here.) But instead of just sketching out every possible outcome of every game, we can also get the number of possible brackets using those exponents. All we have to do is take the number of outcomes for a game (2) and raise it to the power of the number of games in the tournament.

For our first example, that’s 2^3, which gives us 8. For the second, it’s 2^7, giving us 128. MORE: This is the longest we believe a March Madness bracket has ever stayed perfect Now let’s apply that to the modern NCAA tournament. Since 2011, the NCAA tournament has had 68 teams competing in its field. As such, the number of possible outcomes for a bracket is 2^63, or 9,223,372,036,854,775,808. That’s 9.2 quintillion. In case you were wondering, one quintillion is one billion billions. If we treated the odds for each game as a coin flip, that makes the odds of picking all 63 games correctly 1 in 9.2 quintillion.

Again, this is not a completely accurate representation of the odds, as any knowledge of the sport or tournament’s history improves your chances of picking games. But it is one of the easiest to quantify, so let’s have some fun with it. How crazy are 1 in 9.2 quintillion odds? Let’s do another visual experiment.

Here is a picture of one dot: Missed it? No worries, we’ll help you out. It’s inside the circle. Okay, now let’s take a look at one million of those dots: Definitely easier to see. But we still have a long way to go. Now imagine a new picture where each one of those dots in the picture above contained one million dots itself. One million million dots. Also known as a trillion. We’d need 9.2 million of those new pictures to get 9.2 quintillion dots.

Not impressed yet? Fine. A group of researchers at the University of Hawaii estimated that there are 7.5 quintillion grains of sand on Earth. If we were to pick one of those at random, and then give you one chance to guess which of the 7.5 quintillion grains of sand on the entire planet we had chosen, your odds of getting it correct would be 23 percent better than picking a perfect bracket by coin flip.

These numbers are way too large to fully wrap your head around, but here are a handful of other statistics for reference, compared to 9.2 quintillion.

There are 31.6 million seconds in a year, so 9.2 quintillion seconds is a quick 292 billion years. There have been 5 trillion days since the Big Bang, so repeat the entire history of our universe 1.8 million times. The Earth’s circumference is approximately 1.58 billion inches, so you’d have to walk around the planet 5.8 billion times. As of 2015, the best estimates for the number of trees on the planet was three trillion. Imagine that there was one single acorn hidden in one of those three trillion trees, and you were tasked with finding it on the first guess. Your odds of success are approximately three million times greater than picking a perfect bracket.

But we’ve already said that the 1 in 9.2 quintillion figure is a bit disingenuous. Others have tried to refine the rough estimate. Georgia Tech professor Joel Sokol (that’s him above) has worked for years on a statistical model to predict college basketball games, and he says that the best models we have today are only right three quarters of the time, at best.

“In general, about 75 percent is where you’ll get for essentially any model,” Sokol said. “Any of the best ones. Which is partly what makes people think that about a quarter of tournament games are upsets. It might be a little higher or a little lower, but give or take, it’s close to 75 percent, where the best models can pick out which teams are better than others and then it’s just a question of whether the ball bounces the right way, who is playing better that day, whatever, whether you get the upset that day or not.” Sokol said that using a model that predicts regular-season games correctly 75 percent of the time would give you odds of getting a perfect bracket anywhere between 1 in 10 billion to 1 in 40 billion.

Much, much better than 1 in 9.2 quintillion, but still crazy high. So high that Sokol doesn’t believe it will ever happen. “Even the most optimistic number I’ve seen, which is about 1 in 2 billion, that means give or take, if you want a 50-50 chance of ever seeing it in your life, you have to go through 1 billion NCAA tournaments,” he said.

“And you might say, well there’s millions of people filling these brackets out every year, but really there’s not that much variation in the brackets, compared to how many there could be.” About that, last year, of the millions of brackets entered into our Bracket Challenge Game, 94.4 percent were unique.

Even with 94.4 percent of millions of brackets being unique, we only covered 0.0000000000182 percent of all possible bracket permutations. So close. Speaking of Bracket Challenge Game users, we can use that data to get another estimate on the odds of a perfect bracket.

We have the pick history for millions of players over the past five years. We looked at the average user’s pick accuracy for all 32 first round games over the past five years (that’s 160 games per user). Then we weighted those percentages by the frequency of that matchup’s seed differential. For example, a 5 vs.12 game has a seed differential of 7.

There have been 222 games with a seed differential of 7 in the NCAA tournament’s modern history. Then, we combined all the percentages to give us the average player’s accuracy for an average game: 66.7 percent. Not bad. Now, for the odds of a perfect bracket using that percentage: 667^63 = 0.00000000000831625.

  1. That’s equal to odds of 1 in 120.2 billion — 70 million times better than if every game was a coin flip.
  2. How attainable are odds of 1 in 120.2 billion? If every person in the United States filled out a completely unique bracket that was 66.7 percent accurate, we’d expect to see a perfect bracket 366 years from now.

You know, if March Madness is still happening in the year 2385. But until all Americans come together to proficiently fill out unique brackets, keep ignoring that little voice in your head, and take solace in the fact that you don’t have to be anywhere near perfect to win.

How do you make a March Madness tournament?

Who can make the NCAA tournament? – In order to qualify for March Madness, a Division I college basketball team must either win its conference tournament or receive an “at-large” bid from the NCAA tournament selection committee. A total of 68 teams play in the tournament, with 32 of those teams earning an automatic bid by winning their conference tournament.

  1. The 36 remaining tournament bids are granted by the selection committee and are revealed on Selection Sunday.
  2. The committee is also in charge of seeding and placing each team in one of four regions of the tournament bracket : the East, West, Midwest and South.
  3. Each region will be seeded 1-16.
  4. The selection committee is currently comprised of eight athletic directors and two conference commissioners in Division I men’s and women’s athletics.

Members serve a five-year term. Duncan Robinson (22) of the Michigan Wolverines cuts down the net to celebrate the victory during the NCAA Division I Men’s Championship Elite Eight round basketball game between the Florida State Seminoles and the Michigan Wolverines. (Photo by Chris Williams/Icon Sportswire)

Can you make a tournament bracket in Excel?

Below you will find our Excel Tournament Brackets for Single Elimination, Double Elimination, and 3 Game Guarantee. Once you have downloaded the bracket you need, you will be able to directly type in team names, dates, times, and locations of games. You will also be able to fill in the bracket as the teams advance through the tournament.

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How many possible NCAA brackets can be made?

Every year, millions of people fill out a bracket for the NCAA tournament. If you’re like us, you hear that little voice saying, “What if I became the first person ever to fill out a perfect bracket? This could be the year!” That little voice knows one thing: No one has gotten a verifiably perfect bracket in the history of the NCAA tournament.

But it also has one thing very wrong: This will not be the year. And neither will next year, or any in the next millennium. BRACKETS: Print the official March Madness bracket Yes, it is technically possible, and even absurdly overwhelming odds don’t mean it couldn’t theoretically happen this year. But we’re pretty confident in saying that it won’t.

How crazy small is the chance? Here’s the TL/DR version of the odds of a perfect NCAA bracket:

1 in 9,223,372,036,854,775,808 (if you just guess or flip a coin) 1 in 120.2 billion (if you know a little something about basketball)

Your chances will increase with more knowledge of the current teams, the tournament’s history, and an understanding of the sport itself. For instance, before UMBC’s historic upset of Virginia last year, it was practically a guarantee that all four 1 seeds would win their matchups (they’re still 135 for 136 through the modern tournament’s history), giving you four automatically correct games to start off with.

But that type of knowledge is near impossible to quantify or accurately factor into an equation. We’ll get to advanced calculations that attempt to take knowledge into account later on, but to get a better understanding, let’s first look at the most basic calculation. What are your odds if you had a perfect 50-50 chance of guessing every game correctly? Well that would depend on the number of total possible bracket permutations for the tournament.

So how do we calculate this? We’ll look at a small sample bracket first. Like the NCAA tournament, our sample bracket will be a single-elimination tournament, but it will feature just four teams. Let’s fill out all of the possible outcomes for that tournament’s bracket: That gives us eight bracket permutations. For a small field of just four, that’s easy to sketch out. But even if we just double the field to eight teams, the results are daunting. With eight teams, we go from eight bracket permutations to 128: That’s the fun thing about exponents: they increase exponentially. (And for those of you who are so bored you wanted to zoom in on each of those 128 brackets, no we didn’t take the time to actually fill out each one correctly. That would take too long.

That’s kinda the point here.) But instead of just sketching out every possible outcome of every game, we can also get the number of possible brackets using those exponents. All we have to do is take the number of outcomes for a game (2) and raise it to the power of the number of games in the tournament.

For our first example, that’s 2^3, which gives us 8. For the second, it’s 2^7, giving us 128. MORE: This is the longest we believe a March Madness bracket has ever stayed perfect Now let’s apply that to the modern NCAA tournament. Since 2011, the NCAA tournament has had 68 teams competing in its field. As such, the number of possible outcomes for a bracket is 2^63, or 9,223,372,036,854,775,808. That’s 9.2 quintillion. In case you were wondering, one quintillion is one billion billions. If we treated the odds for each game as a coin flip, that makes the odds of picking all 63 games correctly 1 in 9.2 quintillion.

Again, this is not a completely accurate representation of the odds, as any knowledge of the sport or tournament’s history improves your chances of picking games. But it is one of the easiest to quantify, so let’s have some fun with it. How crazy are 1 in 9.2 quintillion odds? Let’s do another visual experiment.

Here is a picture of one dot: Missed it? No worries, we’ll help you out. It’s inside the circle. Okay, now let’s take a look at one million of those dots: Definitely easier to see. But we still have a long way to go. Now imagine a new picture where each one of those dots in the picture above contained one million dots itself. One million million dots. Also known as a trillion. We’d need 9.2 million of those new pictures to get 9.2 quintillion dots.

Not impressed yet? Fine. A group of researchers at the University of Hawaii estimated that there are 7.5 quintillion grains of sand on Earth. If we were to pick one of those at random, and then give you one chance to guess which of the 7.5 quintillion grains of sand on the entire planet we had chosen, your odds of getting it correct would be 23 percent better than picking a perfect bracket by coin flip.

These numbers are way too large to fully wrap your head around, but here are a handful of other statistics for reference, compared to 9.2 quintillion.

There are 31.6 million seconds in a year, so 9.2 quintillion seconds is a quick 292 billion years. There have been 5 trillion days since the Big Bang, so repeat the entire history of our universe 1.8 million times. The Earth’s circumference is approximately 1.58 billion inches, so you’d have to walk around the planet 5.8 billion times. As of 2015, the best estimates for the number of trees on the planet was three trillion. Imagine that there was one single acorn hidden in one of those three trillion trees, and you were tasked with finding it on the first guess. Your odds of success are approximately three million times greater than picking a perfect bracket.

But we’ve already said that the 1 in 9.2 quintillion figure is a bit disingenuous. Others have tried to refine the rough estimate. Georgia Tech professor Joel Sokol (that’s him above) has worked for years on a statistical model to predict college basketball games, and he says that the best models we have today are only right three quarters of the time, at best.

“In general, about 75 percent is where you’ll get for essentially any model,” Sokol said. “Any of the best ones. Which is partly what makes people think that about a quarter of tournament games are upsets. It might be a little higher or a little lower, but give or take, it’s close to 75 percent, where the best models can pick out which teams are better than others and then it’s just a question of whether the ball bounces the right way, who is playing better that day, whatever, whether you get the upset that day or not.” Sokol said that using a model that predicts regular-season games correctly 75 percent of the time would give you odds of getting a perfect bracket anywhere between 1 in 10 billion to 1 in 40 billion.

Much, much better than 1 in 9.2 quintillion, but still crazy high. So high that Sokol doesn’t believe it will ever happen. “Even the most optimistic number I’ve seen, which is about 1 in 2 billion, that means give or take, if you want a 50-50 chance of ever seeing it in your life, you have to go through 1 billion NCAA tournaments,” he said.

“And you might say, well there’s millions of people filling these brackets out every year, but really there’s not that much variation in the brackets, compared to how many there could be.” About that, last year, of the millions of brackets entered into our Bracket Challenge Game, 94.4 percent were unique.

Even with 94.4 percent of millions of brackets being unique, we only covered 0.0000000000182 percent of all possible bracket permutations. So close. Speaking of Bracket Challenge Game users, we can use that data to get another estimate on the odds of a perfect bracket.

  1. We have the pick history for millions of players over the past five years.
  2. We looked at the average user’s pick accuracy for all 32 first round games over the past five years (that’s 160 games per user).
  3. Then we weighted those percentages by the frequency of that matchup’s seed differential.
  4. For example, a 5 vs.12 game has a seed differential of 7.

There have been 222 games with a seed differential of 7 in the NCAA tournament’s modern history. Then, we combined all the percentages to give us the average player’s accuracy for an average game: 66.7 percent. Not bad. Now, for the odds of a perfect bracket using that percentage: 667^63 = 0.00000000000831625.

That’s equal to odds of 1 in 120.2 billion — 70 million times better than if every game was a coin flip. How attainable are odds of 1 in 120.2 billion? If every person in the United States filled out a completely unique bracket that was 66.7 percent accurate, we’d expect to see a perfect bracket 366 years from now.

You know, if March Madness is still happening in the year 2385. But until all Americans come together to proficiently fill out unique brackets, keep ignoring that little voice in your head, and take solace in the fact that you don’t have to be anywhere near perfect to win.

Have there ever been any perfect brackets?

What are the odds for a perfect March Madness bracket? – No one has ever had a perfect bracket for March Madness, The odds are definitely not in anyone’s favor, because mathematically, the chances of someone coming up with a perfectly accurate bracket are one in 9.2 quintillion,

  1. As you’re no doubt aware, a quintillion is the number one followed by 18 zeros.
  2. As the boffins at NCAA worked out it’s 1 in 9,223,372,036,854,775,808 if you just guess or flip a coin, and a slightly better 1 in 120.2 billion, if you know a little something about basketball.
  3. The odds are so small that In 2014, billionaire Warren Buffett was confident enough to offer to pay $1 billion to anyone who would be able to come up with a perfect March Madness bracket.

No one succeeded, as expected, and though the fifth richest man in the world made the same offer in succeeding years, it was typically made available only to employees of Buffett’s company, Berkshire Hathaway.