Can you take 10mg prednisone for 5 days?

Official answer. There is no set limit on how long you can safely take prednisone.

How do you take a 5 day prednisone pack?

0601 Medication name Generic name: Prednisolone – oral Pronunciation (pred-NISS-oh-lone) Brand name(s) Delta-Cortef, Millipred DP Uses Prednisolone is a man-made form of a natural substance (corticosteroid hormone) made by the adrenal gland. It is used to treat conditions such as arthritis, blood problems, immune system disorders, skin and eye conditions, breathing problems, cancer, and severe allergies.

It decreases your immune system’s response to various diseases to reduce symptoms such as pain, swelling and allergic-type reactions. How to use Take this medication by mouth, with food or milk to prevent stomach upset, exactly as directed by your doctor. Take this medication with a full glass of water (8 ounces/240 milliliters) unless your doctor directs you otherwise.

Follow the dosing schedule carefully. The dosage and length of treatment are based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Your doctor may direct you to take prednisolone 1 to 4 times a day or take a single dose every other day. It may help to mark your calendar with reminders or use a pill box.

  1. If you are using the prednisolone dose pack, follow the dosing schedule on the package, unless directed otherwise by your doctor.
  2. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.
  3. Some conditions may become worse when this drug is suddenly stopped.
  4. Your dose may need to be gradually decreased.

If you suddenly stop using this medication, you may have withdrawal symptoms (such as weakness, weight loss, nausea, muscle pain, headache, tiredness, dizziness). To help prevent withdrawal, your doctor may lower your dose slowly. Withdrawal is more likely if you have used prednisolone for a long time or in high doses.

Tell your doctor or pharmacist right away if you have withdrawal. See also Precautions section. Tell your doctor if your condition lasts or gets worse. Side effects Nausea, heartburn, headache, dizziness, menstrual period changes, trouble sleeping, increased sweating, or acne may occur. If any of these effects last or get worse, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that this medication has been prescribed because your doctor has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects. Because this drug works by weakening the immune system, it may lower your ability to fight infections.

  1. This may make you more likely to get a serious (rarely fatal) infection or make any infection you have worse.
  2. Tell your doctor right away if you have any signs of infection (such as cough, sore throat, fever, chills).
  3. Use of this medication for prolonged or repeated periods may result in oral thrush or a yeast infection.

Contact your doctor if you notice white patches in your mouth or a change in vaginal discharge. This medication may rarely make your blood sugar rise, which can cause or worsen diabetes. Tell your doctor right away if you have symptoms of high blood sugar such as increased thirst/urination.

unusual tiredness swelling ankles/feet unusual weight gain vision problems easy bruising/bleeding puffy face unusual hair growth mental/mood changes (such as depression, mood swings, agitation) muscle weakness/pain thinning skin slow wound healing bone pain symptoms of stomach/intestinal bleeding (such as stomach/abdominal pain, black/tarry stools, vomit that looks like coffee grounds)

Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including:

chest pain seizures

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including:

rash itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat) severe dizziness trouble breathing

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. In the US – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

  1. In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.
  2. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.
  3. Precautions Before taking prednisolone, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to prednisone; or if you have any other allergies.
  4. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems.

Talk to your pharmacist for more details. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of:

eye disease (such as cataracts, glaucoma) heart problems (such as heart failure, recent heart attack) high blood pressure liver disease kidney disease thyroid problems diabetes stomach/intestinal problems (such as diverticulitis, ulcer) brittle bones (osteoporosis) current/past infections (such as tuberculosis, positive tuberculosis test, herpes, fungal) bleeding problems blood clots mental/mood conditions (such as psychosis, anxiety, depression) low salts in the blood (such as low potassium or calcium) seizures

This drug may make you dizzy. Alcohol or marijuana (cannabis) can make you more dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness until you can do it safely. Limit alcoholic beverages. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana (cannabis).

This medicine may cause stomach bleeding. Daily use of alcohol while using this medicine may increase your risk for stomach bleeding. Limit alcoholic beverages. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

Using corticosteroid medications for a long time can make it more difficult for your body to respond to physical stress. Before having surgery or emergency treatment, or if you get a serious illness/injury, tell your doctor or dentist that you are using this medication or have used this medication within the past 12 months.

  1. Tell your doctor right away if you develop unusual/extreme tiredness or weight loss.
  2. If you will be using this medication for a long time, carry a warning card or medical ID bracelet that identifies your use of this medication.
  3. This medication may mask signs of infection.
  4. It can make you more likely to get infections or may make current infections worse.

Stay away from anyone who has an infection that may easily spread (such as chickenpox, COVID-19, measles, flu). Talk to your doctor if you have been exposed to an infection or for more details. Tell your health care professional that you are using prednisolone before having any immunizations/vaccinations.

Avoid contact with people who have recently received live vaccines (such as flu vaccine inhaled through the nose). This medication may slow down a child’s growth if used for a long time. Consult the doctor or pharmacist for more details. See the doctor regularly so your child’s height and growth can be checked.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the effects of this drug, especially bone loss/pain, stomach/intestinal bleeding, and mental/mood changes (such as confusion). During pregnancy, prednisolone should be used only when clearly needed. It may rarely harm an unborn baby.

Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Infants born to mothers who have been using this medication for an extended period of time may have hormone problems. Tell your doctor right away if you notice symptoms such as nausea/vomiting that doesn’t stop, severe diarrhea, or weakness in your newborn.

This medication passes into breast milk. However, this drug is unlikely to harm a nursing infant. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding. Drug interactions Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects.

This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include:

aldesleukin other drugs that weaken the immune system (such as azathioprine, cyclosporine, cancer chemotherapy) mifepristone drugs that can cause bleeding/bruising (including antiplatelet drugs such as clopidogrel, “blood thinners” such as dabigatran/warfarin, NSAIDs such as aspirin/celecoxib/ibuprofen)

Other medications can affect the removal of prednisolone from your body, which may affect how prednisolone works. Examples include estrogens, azole antifungals (such as itraconazole), St. John’s wort, drugs used to treat seizures (such as phenytoin), among others.

  1. If your doctor has directed you to take low-dose aspirin for heart attack or stroke prevention (usually 81-162 milligrams a day), you should continue taking it unless your doctor instructs you otherwise.
  2. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.
  3. This medication may interfere with certain lab tests (such as skin tests), possibly causing false test results.

Make sure lab personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug. Overdose If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

  • Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center.
  • Notes Do not share this medication with others.
  • If this medication is used for a long time, lab and/or medical tests (such as blood sugar/mineral levels, blood counts, blood pressure, bone density tests, eye exams, height/weight measurements, X-rays) should be done while you are taking this medication.

Keep all medical and lab appointments. Consult your doctor for more details. This medication may cause bone problems (osteoporosis). Lifestyle changes that may help reduce the risk of bone problems while taking this drug for an extended time include doing weight-bearing exercise, getting enough calcium and vitamin D, stopping smoking, and limiting alcohol.

Discuss with your doctor lifestyle changes that might benefit you. Missed dose If you are taking this medication once daily and miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose. Take your next dose at the regular time. If you are taking this medication every other day, ask your doctor or pharmacist what you should do if you miss a dose.

Storage Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets. Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed.

Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company. Medical alert Your condition can cause complications in a medical emergency. For information about enrolling in MedicAlert, call 1-888-633-4298 (US) or 1-800-668-1507 (Canada). Important note HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product.

This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

How do you take 10mg prednisone?

Proper Use – Take this medicine exactly as directed by your doctor. Do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered. To do so may increase the chance for unwanted effects. Take this medicine with food or milk to avoid stomach irritation.

Swallow the delayed-release tablet whole. Do not crush, break, or chew it. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Prednisone Intensol™ solution is a concentrated liquid. Measure the concentrated liquid with the special oral dropper that comes with the package.

If you use this medicine for a long time, do not suddenly stop using it without checking first with your doctor. You may need to slowly decrease your dose before stopping it completely.

How often should prednisone 10 mg be taken?

How to take it – Unless your doctor or pharmacist gives you different instructions, it’s best to take prednisolone as a single dose once a day, with breakfast. For example, if your dose is 40mg daily, your doctor may tell you to take 8 tablets (8 x 5mg) all at the same time.

Take prednisolone with breakfast so it does not upset your stomach. Taking prednisolone in the morning also means it’s less likely to affect your sleep. If your prednisolone tablets are labelled as “enteric coated” or “gastro resistant”, you can take these with or without food but make sure to swallow them whole.

Do not take indigestion medicines 2 hours before or after taking enteric coated or gastro resistant tablets. Sometimes, your doctor may advise you to take prednisolone on alternate days only.

Is it OK to take 10 mg of prednisone daily?

Official answer. The starting dose of prednisone may be between 5 mg to 60 mg per day. A dose above 40 mg per day may be considered a high dose.

Is 10 mg of prednisone a day a lot?

Therefore, there is really no standard dose. Lower doses of prednisone (i.e., 1-10 mg daily) may be sufficient for certain types of inflammatory arthritis, while higher doses (20 mg per day and upwards) may be needed in other cases.

What is a 5-day regimen of prednisone?

DOSAGE & INDICATIONS – For primary adrenocortical insufficiency (Addison’s disease, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, adrenogenital syndrome) or secondary adrenocortical insufficiency. Oral dosage Adults 5 mg PO in the morning and 2.5 mg PO in the evening.

The literature reports a range of 5 to 7.5 mg/day for CAH maintenance in adults, given in 1 or more divided doses. Higher doses are needed in times of physiologic stress. NOTE: Hydrocortisone and cortisone are the preferred agents. Adolescents and Children Maintenance dose for Addison’s disease: 1.5 to 3.5 mg/m2/day; usually given in 2 divided doses.

Higher doses are needed in times of physicologic stress. The maintenance dosage for pediatric patients with CAH was 3 to 6.6 mg/m2/day PO in one study that compared prednisone to hydrocortisone. The preferred glucocorticoid for CAH in infants, children, and adolescents (until final height has been reached) is hydrocortisone, which minimizes the negative effects of treatment on growth.

For the treatment of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Oral dosage Adults Prednisone alternating with cyclosporine has been recommended at doses of prednisone 1 mg/kg/day PO plus cyclosporine (10 mg/kg/day PO in 2 divided doses) based on actual or ideal body weight, whichever is lower. After 2 weeks if no disease progression is noted, the prednisone dose is tapered by 25% per week to 1 mg/kg of prednisone on alternate days.

Once the prednisone taper is completed without a flare, the cyclosporine dose is tapered to alternate day dosing such that the patient is taking prednisone one day and cyclosporine the next day. Once patients reach their maximal response, therapy is continued for another 3 months and then tapered.

For kidney transplant rejection prophylaxis. Oral dosage Adults Titrate to response. The usual range is 5 mg to 30 mg PO once daily. Renal transplant guidelines recommend a calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) such as tacrolimus and an antiproliferative agent such as mycophenolate plus or minus corticosteroids for initial prophylaxis.

In patients at low immunologic risk who receive induction therapy, corticosteroid discontinuation during first week after transplantation is suggested. Some evidence exists that steroids may be safely stopped in most patients after 3 to 12 months on combination therapy with a CNI and mycophenolate.

Data suggest that the risk of steroid withdrawal depends on the use of concomitant immunosuppressives, immunological risk, ethnicity, and time after transplantation. For palliative management of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Oral dosage Adults 40 mg/m2 to 50 mg/m2 PO once daily indefinitely. For the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).

For the first-line treatment of CLL, in combination with cladribine†. Oral dosage Adults 30 mg/m2 PO daily for 5 days in combination with cladribine 0.12 mg/kg/day IV over 2 hours for 5 days repeated every 28 days for up to 6 cycles has been studied in a randomized trial.

  • NOTE: Prednisone is approved for the palliative treatment; however, all components of combination regimens may not have been evaluated by the FDA for the treatment of CLL.
  • For the first-line treatment of CLL, in combination with chlorambucil†.
  • Oral dosage Adults 80 mg PO once daily on Day 1, Day 2, Day 3, Day 4, and Day 5 in combination with chlorambucil 30 mg/m2 PO on Day 1 repeated every 2 weeks for up to 18 months and maximum response was evaluated in a randomized study.

Alternatively, prednisone 30 mg/m2 PO daily for 7 days plus chlorambucil 12 mg/m2 PO daily for 7 days repeated every 28 days for up to 6 courses was used in another randomized study. NOTE: Prednisone is approved for the palliative treatment of CLL; however, all components of combination regimens may not have been evaluated by the FDA for the treatment of CLL.

For the palliative treatment of CLL. Oral dosage Adults Multiple dosage regimens have been studied. Initial dosage may vary from 5 mg/day to 60 mg/day PO. Dosage requirements are variable though and should be individualized based on the response of the patient and tolerance to treatment. NOTE: Prednisone is approved for the palliative treatment of CLL; however, all components of combination regimens may not have been evaluated by the FDA for the treatment of CLL.

For the short-term treatment of hypercalcemia secondary to neoplastic disease. Oral dosage Adults 50 mg/day to 100 mg/day PO for 3 to 5 days is usually effective for hypercalcemia due to hematologic cancers, lower doses may be effective for some tumors.

  • For the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.
  • For the treatment of acute exacerbations of Crohn’s disease.
  • Oral dosage Adults 40 to 60 mg PO once daily for 1 to 2 weeks, initially.
  • Taper dose by 5 mg/week until 20 mg PO once daily, and then taper dose by 2.5 to 5 mg/week; the taper should generally not exceed 3 months.

Guidelines state that corticosteroids are not effective for maintenance of medically-induced remission in Crohn’s disease and should not be used for long-term treatment. Corticosteroids for Crohn’s disease are more effective for small-bowel involvement than for colonic involvement.

  1. Because of the potential complications of steroid use in this disease, steroids should be used selectively and in the lowest dose possible.
  2. For the treatment of ulcerative colitis.
  3. Oral dosage Adults 40 to 60 mg PO once daily, initially.
  4. Taper dose by 5 to 10 mg/week based on clinical symptoms, cumulative steroid exposure, and onset of action of alternate therapies; limit use to the shortest duration possible with early initiation of steroid-sparing therapy.

Guidelines recommend oral corticosteroids to induce remission in persons with ulcerative colitis; however, guidelines recommend against systemic corticosteroids for the maintenance of remission. For the treatment of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA)/juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), ankylosing spondylitis, acute and subacute bursitis, acute non-specific tenosynovitis, acute gouty arthritis and gout, osteoarthritis, or epicondylitis.

  1. Oral dosage Adults Titrate to response.
  2. Usual dosage ranges from 5 to 30 mg PO once daily.
  3. Children and Adolescents 0.05 mg/kg/day to 2 mg/kg/day PO given in 1 to 4 divided doses.
  4. For the treatment of systemic autoimmune conditions such as acquired hemolytic anemia, congenital hypoplastic anemia, or symptomatic sarcoidosis.

Oral dosage Adults Titrate to response. Usual dosage ranges from 5 mg to 30 mg PO once daily. For the treatment of asthma exacerbation. Oral dosage Adults 40 to 80 mg/day PO in 1 to 2 divided doses for 5 to 10 days. Children and Adolescents 12 to 17 years 40 to 80 mg/day PO in 1 to 2 divided doses for 3 to 10 days.

  • Children 6 to 11 years 1 to 2 mg/kg/day (Max: 40 mg/dose) PO in 1 to 2 divided doses for 3 to 10 days.
  • Children 3 to 5 years 1 to 2 mg/kg/day (Max: 30 mg/dose) PO in 1 to 2 divided doses for 3 to 10 days.
  • Infants and Children 1 to 2 years 1 to 2 mg/kg/day (Max: 20 mg/dose) PO in 1 to 2 divided doses for 3 to 10 days.

For asthma maintenance treatment. Oral dosage Adults 7.5 to 60 mg PO once daily or every other day as needed for symptom control. Use the lowest effective dose; alternate day therapy may produce less adrenal suppression. Dosing in the afternoon at 3 PM may be helpful for patients prone to nocturnal symptoms, with no increase in adrenal suppression.

Consider add-on low dose oral corticosteroids (7.5 mg/day or less of prednisone equivalent) only for those with poor symptom control and/or frequent exacerbation despite good inhaler technique and treatment adherence. Add corticosteroids only after exclusion of other contributory factors and consideration of other add-on treatments.

Children and Adolescents 12 to 17 years 7.5 to 60 mg PO once daily or every other day as needed for symptom control. Use the lowest effective dose; alternate day therapy may produce less adrenal suppression. In pediatric patients, the use of oral corticosteroids is usually limited to a few weeks until asthma control is improved and the patient can be stabilized on other, preferred treatments.

  • Children 6 to 11 years 0.25 to 2 mg/kg/dose (Usual Max: 40 mg/dose) PO once daily or every other day as needed for symptom control.
  • Use the lowest effective dose; alternate day therapy may produce less adrenal suppression.
  • In pediatric patients, the use of oral corticosteroids is usually limited to a few weeks until asthma control is improved and the patient can be stabilized on other, preferred treatments.

Children 3 to 5 years 0.25 to 2 mg/kg/dose (Usual Max: 30 mg/dose) PO once daily or every other day as needed for symptom control. Use the lowest effective dose; alternate day therapy may produce less adrenal suppression. In pediatric patients, the use of oral corticosteroids is usually limited to a few weeks until asthma control is improved and the patient can be stabilized on other, preferred treatments.

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Infants and Children 1 to 2 years 0.25 to 2 mg/kg/dose (Usual Max: 20 mg/dose) PO once daily or every other day as needed for symptom control. Use the lowest effective dose; alternate day therapy may produce less adrenal suppression. In pediatric patients, the use of oral corticosteroids is usually limited to a few weeks until asthma control is improved and the patient can be stabilized on other, preferred treatments.

For the treatment of thrombocytopenia or immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). In patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Oral dosage Adults Initially, 1 mg/kg PO once daily; however, lower doses of 5 mg/day to 10 mg/day PO are preferable for long-term treatment.

  • For autoimmune thrombocytopenia associated with SLE.
  • Oral dosage Adults, Adolescents, and Children 0.25 mg/kg/day PO was as effective as higher doses of 1 mg/kg/day.
  • For the treatment of exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
  • Oral dosage Adults 40 mg PO once daily for 5 days is the most commonly recommended regimen.

A multicenter, randomized, controlled trial confirmed that this shorter duration of low dose prednisone is equivalent to using 40 mg of prednisone for a longer duration (i.e., 14 days). The use of systemic steroids for no more than 5 to 7 days is recommended by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guidelines.

Data from studies indicate that systemic glucocorticoids shorten recovery time; improve lung function (FEV-1), improve oxygenation, and reduce the risk of early relapse, treatment failure, and the length of hospitalization. For the treatment of myasthenia gravis in patients who are poorly controlled with cholinesterase inhibitor therapy.

Oral dosage Adults Initially, 15 mg/day to 20 mg/day PO. Increase by 5 mg every 2 to 3 days as needed. Maximum: 60 mg/day PO. For chronic use, may change to every other day therapy. For the treatment of psoriatic arthritis or severe plaque psoriasis. Oral dosage Adults Titrate to response.

  1. Usual dosage ranges from 5 to 30 mg PO once daily.
  2. Use the lowest effective dose (usually less than 7.5 mg/day, per guidelines).
  3. Usual Max: 60 mg/day PO.
  4. Guidelines for psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis recommend short-term use (avoid long-term use) of systemic corticosteroids for acute relief of symptoms/flares with caution; local corticosteroid injections are often preferable for oligoarthritis, dactylitis or in enthesitis.

For the treatment of proteinuria in nephrotic syndrome, without uremia, of the idiopathic type or due to lupus nephritis. For the treatment of lupus nephritis. Oral dosage Adults American College of Rheumatology guidelines recommend 0.5 to 1 mg/kg/day PO (the higher dose is recommended if crescents seen) after induction therapy with methylprednisolone (500 to 1,000 mg/day IV for 3 doses) and other induction drugs.

Taper the dose after a few weeks to the lowest effective dose that maintains control. Insufficient data exist to recommend a specific steroid taper because nephritis and extrarenal manifestations vary from patient to patient. Prednisone up to 10 mg/day has been used long term for maintenance, along with other medications.

Oral dosage Adults 40 mg/day to 80 mg/day PO until urine is protein-free; slowly taper as indicated. Some patients may require long-term therapy. Children and Adolescents 2 mg/kg/day or 60 mg/m2/day (Maximum: 80 mg) PO once daily until urine is protein-free for 3 consecutive days.

Then 1 mg/kg to 1.5 mg/kg or 40 mg/m2 PO every other day for 4 weeks. If needed, the long-term maintenance dose is 0.5 to 1 mg/kg PO every other day for 3 to 6 months. For the treatment of severe erythema multiforme or Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Oral dosage Adults In patients with severe skin reactions, higher initial doses (e.g., 60 mg/day PO) are usually required.

Adjust until a satisfactory response is noted; taper as clinically indicated. High-dose corticosteroids are controversial; administration has been associated with decreased survival. Prednisone doses of 60 mg/day to 250 mg/day PO are equivalent to the recommended hydrocortisone doses of 240 mg/day to 1,000 mg/day.

For the treatment of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses and dermatologic disorders such as atopic dermatitis or eczema, bullous dermatitis herpetiformis, contact dermatitis, exfoliative dermatitis, mycosis fungoides, pemphigus, or severe seborrheic dermatitis. Oral dosage Adults 5 to 60 mg PO once daily, initially.

Adjust dose to achieve a satisfactory response, and then reduce dose by small increments to lowest dose that will maintain an adequate response. Taper long-term therapy gradually when discontinuing. Infants, Children, and Adolescents 0.14 to 2 mg/kg/dose PO once daily, initially.

  • Adjust dose to achieve a satisfactory response, and then reduce dose by small increments to lowest dose that will maintain an adequate response.
  • Taper long-term therapy gradually when discontinuing.
  • For the treatment of ACE-inhibitor induced angioedema once acute symptoms are controlled.
  • Oral dosage Adults Short courses of 30 to 50 mg/day PO can be given during the late phase of an acute reaction, once oral therapy is appropriate.

FDA-approved dosage: 5 to 60 mg/day PO, depending on disease severity for angioedema; taper as clinically indicated. For the treatment of allergic disorders including anaphylaxis or anaphylactoid reactions, angioedema, acute noninfectious laryngeal edema, hypersensitivity reactions (e.g., drug or food allergy), serum sickness, urticaria, or severe perennial allergies or seasonal allergies, including allergic rhinitis.

  1. Oral dosage Adults 5 to 60 mg/day PO day initially, depending on the specific disease entity and the severity of the condition being treated.
  2. Use lowest effective dose.
  3. Corticosteroids are not indicated as initial treatment for anaphylaxis, but can be given as adjunctive therapy after the administration of epinephrine.

Infants, Children, and Adolescents 1 to 2 mg/kg/day PO (Max: 60 mg/day) in 1 to 4 divided doses for acute control. Treatment duration dependent on specific allergic/hypersensitivity condition, but is usually 2 to 3 weeks. May follow with subsequent treatment with 1 to 2 mg/kg/day (Max: 60 mg/day) PO in 1 to 4 divided doses for 1 to 2 weeks until symptomatic control, then conversion to alternate-day treatment of 1 to 2 mg/kg/day, with tapering by no more than 5 to 10 mg per month.

  1. Corticosteroids are not indicated as initial treatment for anaphylaxis, but can be given as adjunctive therapy after the administration of epinephrine.
  2. For the treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).
  3. Oral dosage Adults Corticosteroid use in ARDS is controversial.
  4. If there are no signs of improvement 7 to 14 days after ARDS onset, 2 mg/kg/day to 4 mg/kg/day PO for 7 to 14 days has been recommended.

For the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Oral dosage Adults The initial dosage may vary from 5 to 60 mg PO per day. Guidelines use a dose of 0.5 mg/kg/day PO for 4 weeks, then 0.25 mg/kg/day PO for 8 weeks. Taper to 0.125 mg/kg/day or 0.25 mg/kg/day PO on alternate days.

Guidelines suggest use of prednisone with cyclophosphamide or azathioprine, and a minimum of 6 months duration. Objective responses may not be noted until at least 3 months of therapy. Exact duration of treatment and need for long-term maintenance should be individualized to clinical response and tolerance of therapy.

Chronic doses of prednisone (15 mg to 20 mg PO once daily) may be adequate as maintenance therapy. For treatment of idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia or aspiration or hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Oral dosage Adults The initial dosage may vary from 5 to 60 mg PO per day.

  • Gradually taper after 1 to 2 weeks and discontinue by 4 to 6 weeks, guided by symptoms.
  • Children and Adolescents The initial dosage may vary from 5 to 60 mg PO per day.
  • Weight-based dosing: 0.14 mg/kg to 2 mg/kg (4 to 60 mg/m2) PO daily, given in 1 to 4 divided doses.
  • Gradually taper after 1 to 2 weeks and discontinue by 4 to 6 weeks, as guided by symptoms.

For the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma in combination with antineoplastic agents. In combination with mechlorethamine, vincristine, vinblastine, and procarbazine (MVVPP regimen). Oral dosage Adults 40 mg/m2/day PO on Day 1 through Day 22, then taper. Chemotherapy cycle is repeated every 57 days.

In combination with mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, doxorubicin, bleomycin, and vinblastine (MOPP/APB regimen). Oral dosage Adults 40 mg/m2/day PO on Day 1 through Day 14; cycle is repeated every 28 days. For the treatment of previously untreated, high-risk classical Hodgkin lymphoma, in combination with brentuximab vedotin, doxorubicin, vincristine, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide.

NOTE: Brentuximab vedotin is FDA approved for this indication. Oral dosage Children 2 years and older and Adolescents 20 mg/m2 orally twice daily on days 1 to 7 in combination with brentuximab vedotin 1.8 mg/kg (not to exceed 180 mg/dose) IV on day 1; doxorubicin 25 mg/m2 IV on days 1 and 2; vincristine 1.4 mg/m2 IV on day 8; etoposide 125 mg/m2 IV on days 1, 2, and 3; and cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2 IV on days 1 and 2 repeated every 3 weeks for up to 5 cycles.

  1. Administer primary prophylaxis with a granulocyte colony-stimulating factor starting in cycle 1 due to the high incidence of febrile neutropenia.
  2. At a median follow-up time of 42.1 (range, 0.1 to 80.9) months, the 3-year event-free survival rate was significantly improved in patients (median age, 15.6 years; range, 3.4 to 21.99 years) with newly diagnosed, stage IIB with bulk tumor or stage IIIB, IVA, or IVB classic Hodgkin lymphoma who received brentuximab vedotin plus AVEPC compared with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, etoposide, prednisone, and cyclophosphamide (ABVE-PC) (92.1% vs.82.5%; hazard ratio = 0.41; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.67) in a multicenter, randomized, phase 3 trial (n = 587).

The 3-year overall survival rates were 99.3% and 98.5% in the brentuximab vedotin plus AVEPC and ABVE-PC arms, respectively. For the treatment of Loeffler’s syndrome, berylliosis, erythroblastopenia, or trichinosis. Oral dosage Adults 5 mg to 60 mg PO per day, administered in 1 to 4 divided doses, depending upon disease being treated.

Depending on the indication, the initial dose may be gradually tapered after 1 to 2 weeks and discontinued by 4 to 6 weeks, as guided by symptoms. Adolescents and Children 0.14 to 2 mg/kg/day PO or 4 to 60 mg/m2/day PO, given in 4 divided doses. Depending on indication, gradually taper the initial dose after 1 to 2 weeks and discontinue by 4 to 6 weeks, guided by symptoms.

For the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis infection or drug-resistant tuberculosis infection as adjunctive therapy in combination with antituberculous therapy. Oral dosage Adults 2.67 mg/kg/day PO with a taper over 6 to 8 weeks. Guidelines recommend as adjunct therapy for meningitis.

Routine use outside of CNS involvement is not recommended; however, select patients may benefit. Infants, Children, and Adolescents 2 to 4 mg/kg/day PO for 4 to 6 weeks, then taper over 2 to 4 weeks. Guidelines recommend as adjunct therapy for meningitis. Routine use outside of CNS involvement is not recommended; however, select patients may benefit.

For the treatment of aggressive lymphomas, including aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). For the treatment of previously untreated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (not otherwise specified) or high-grade B-cell lymphoma in patients who have an International Prognostic Index score of 2 or greater, in combination with polatuzumab vedotin, rituximab, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin†.

  • NOTE: Polatuzumab vedotin is FDA approved in combination with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisone for this indication.
  • Oral dosage Adults 100 mg orally daily on days 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 in combination with polatuzumab vedotin 1.8 mg/kg IV, rituximab 375 mg/m2 IV, cyclophosphamide 750 mg/m2 IV, and doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 IV on day 1 repeated every 21 days for 6 cycles has been evaluated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial (n = 879; the POLARIX trial).

Rituximab 375 mg/m2 IV was continued for 2 additional cycles of therapy (cycles 7 and 8). For the treatment of thyroiditis. For the treatment of subacute thyroiditis. Oral dosage Adults 40 mg PO once daily for 1 to 2 weeks, followed by a gradual taper over 2 to 4 weeks or more depending on clinical response.

The FDA-approved dosage is 5 to 60 mg/day. For the treatment of amiodarone-induced thyroiditis. Oral dosage Adults 40 mg PO once daily for 2 to 4 weeks, followed by a gradual taper over 2 to 3 months depending on clinical response. The FDA-approved dosage is 5 to 60 mg/day. For the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

Oral dosage Adults 5 to 10 mg PO once daily, initially. Taper dose to the lowest effective dose. Doses more than 10 mg/day are rarely indicated. INVESTIGATIONAL USE: For adjunctive use in the treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection†, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)†.

Oral dosage Adults 40 mg PO daily for 7 to 10 days. The World Health Organization strongly recommends the use of systemic corticosteroids in patients with severe or critical COVID-19. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) COVID-19 treatment guidelines recommend prednisone as an alternative corticosteroid for hospitalized patients who require supplemental oxygen, including those on high-flow oxygen, noninvasive ventilation, mechanical ventilation, or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).

The NIH recommends 40 mg PO once daily (or in 2 divided doses) for up to 10 days or until hospital discharge (whichever comes first). The NIH advises clinicians to review the patient’s medical history and assess the potential risks and benefits before starting prednisone.

  1. For the treatment of multiple myeloma†.
  2. For the palliative treatment of multiple myeloma in combination with melphalan†.
  3. NOTE: Melphalan is FDA approved for the palliative treatment of multiple myeloma and has been studied in combination with prednisone.
  4. Oral dosage Adults 2 mg/kg orally daily for 4 days plus melphalan 0.25 mg/kg orally daily for 4 days repeated every 6 weeks has been studied.

Treatment cycles may be repeated when the granulocyte and platelet counts returned to normal. Response may be gradual over several months. For newly diagnosed multiple myeloma in geriatric adults or transplant ineligible patients, in combination with melphalan and thalidomide†.

  • Oral dosage Geriatric Adults The optimal dosage of melphalan and prednisone plus thalidomide has not been clearly established and dosages have varied in randomized controlled trials.
  • In one study, previously untreated patients between 65 and 75 years of age received melphalan (0.25 mg/kg PO daily) for 4 days and prednisone 2 mg/kg PO once daily for 4 days, cycles were repeated every 6 weeks for 12 cycles plus thalidomide (200 mg/day PO for 2 to 4 weeks escalated up to a maximum dose of 400 mg/day PO if no severe adverse events; most patients received thalidomide 200 mg/day or less).

Thalidomide was stopped after day 4 of the last cycle. In another study, patients aged 75 years and older received melphalan (0.2 mg/kg PO daily) for 4 days and prednisone 2 mg/kg PO once daily for 4 days and repeated every 6 weeks for 12 cycles plus thalidomide 100 mg/day PO at bedtime.

For previously untreated multiple myeloma, in combination with melphalan and bortezomib†. NOTE: Bortezomib is FDA approved in combination with melphalan and prednisone for use in previously untreated multiple myeloma. Oral dosage Adults 60 mg/m2 orally daily on days 1, 2, 3, and 4 and melphalan 9 mg/m2 orally daily on days 1, 2, 3, and 4 plus bortezomib repeated every 6 weeks for 9 cycles.

In cycles 1 through 4, bortezomib 1.3 mg/m2 IV or subcutanously is given on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 followed by a 10-day rest period (days 12 through 21) and again on days 22, 25, 29, and 32 followed by a 10-day rest period (days 33 through 42); this 6-week cycle is considered one course.

  • In cycles 5 to 9, bortezomib 1.3 mg/m2 IV or subcutanously is given on days 1, 8, 22, and 29; this 6-week cycle is considered one course.
  • For the treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma in patients ineligible for autologous stem-cell transplant, in combination with daratumumab, bortezomib, and melphalan†.

NOTE: Daratumumab is FDA approved in combination with bortezomib, melphalan, and prednisone for the treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma in patients ineligible for autologous stem-cell transplant. Oral dosage Adults 60 mg/m2 orally daily on days 1, 2, 3, and 4; bortezomib 1.3 mg/m2 subcutaneously twice weekly on weeks 1, 2, 4, and 5 of cycle 1 followed by bortezomib 1.3 mg/m2 subcutaneously once weekly on weeks 1, 2, 4, and 5 of cycles 2 to 9; and melphalan 9 mg/m2 orally daily on days 1, 2, 3, and 4 (VMP regimen) repeated every 6 weeks for 9 cycles in combination with daratumumab was evaluated in a randomized, phase 3 trial.

The manufacturer recommends the following daratumumab dosage in combination with VMP: 16 mg/kg (actual body weight) IV weekly on weeks 1 to 6, 16 mg/kg IV every 3 weeks on weeks 7 to 54, and then 16 mg/kg IV every 4 weeks starting on week 55 until disease progression. In the ALCYONE trial (median follow-up of 40.1 months), the primary endpoint of PFS time was significantly higher with daratumumab plus VMP compared VMP alone (36.4 months vs.19.3 months; hazard ratio (HR) = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.51; p less than 0.0001) in adult patients (n = 706; median age, 71 years; range, 40 to 93 years) with multiple myeloma who were ineligible for high-dose chemotherapy with stem-cell transplant (SCT) due to coexisting conditions or age of 65 years or older and who had not received prior systemic therapy or SCT.

At the time of this analysis, the median overall survival time was significantly improved in patients in the daratumumab plus VMP arm compared with the VMP alone arm (median time not reached in either arm; HR = 0.6; 95% CI, 0.46 to 0.8; p = 0.0003). For the treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma in patients ineligible for autologous stem-cell transplant, in combination with carfilzomib and melphalan†.

  • Oral dosage Adults Dosage not established.
  • The progression-free survival time was not significantly improved with carfilzomib, melphalan, and prednisone compared with bortezomib, melphalan, and prednisone in a randomized, phase 3 trial (the CLARION trial); additionally, serious and fatal adverse reactions occurred more often in the carfilzomib-containing arm.

There is not sufficient evidence to support the use of this drug combination for this indication. For the treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma in patients ineligible for autologous stem-cell transplant, in combination with daratumumab/hyaluronidase, bortezomib, and melphalan†.

NOTE: Daratumumab; hyaluronidase is FDA approved in combination with bortezomib, melphalan, and prednisone for the treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma in patients ineligible for autologous stem-cell transplant. Oral dosage Adults 60 mg/m2 PO daily on days 1, 2, 3, and 4 repeated every 6 weeks on cycles 1 to 9; melphalan 9 mg/m2 PO daily on days 1, 2, 3, and 4 repeated every 6 weeks on cycles 1 to 9; bortezomib 1.3 mg/m2 subcutaneously twice weekly on weeks 1, 2, 4, and 5 for the first 6-week cycle (8 doses in cycle 1) followed by bortezomib 1.3 mg/m2 subcutaneously once weekly on weeks 1, 2, 4, and 5 for 8 more 6-week cycles (4 doses/cycle in cycles 2 to 9); and 1,800 mg daratumumab and 30,000 units hyaluronidase subcutaneously weekly on weeks 1 to 6 (6 doses), every 3 weeks on weeks 7 to 54 (16 doses), and then every 4 weeks starting on week 55 until disease progression was evaluated in a single-arm cohort (n = 67) of a multicohort, open-label trial (the PLEIADES trial).

The overall response rate was 88% in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma who were ineligible for transplant who received daratumumab/hyaluronidase, bortezomib, melphalan, and prednisone. For the treatment of serious manifestations of Behcet’s syndrome†.

  • Oral dosage Adults 1 mg/kg PO once daily is recommended.
  • For the symptomatic treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy†.
  • Oral dosage Children and Adolescents Current practice guidelines issued by the American Academy of Neurology and the Child Neurology Society recommend 0.75 mg/kg/day PO.
  • If side effects (e.g., weight gain and Cushingoid facial appearance) outweigh benefits on muscle strength and function, gradual dose reduction to as low as 0.3 mg/kg/day PO can still be beneficial.

For the adjunctive treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome†. Oral dosage Adults 20 mg PO once daily for 2 weeks, followed by 10 mg PO once daily for 2 additional weeks, has provided relief. NOTE: The definitive treatment for median-nerve entrapment is surgery.

  1. Corticosteroids are temporary measures; patients who have intermittent pain and paresthesias without any fixed motor sensory deficits may respond to conservative therapy.
  2. For the treatment of collagen disorders and mixed connective tissue disease†, such as acute rheumatic carditis, systemic dermatomyositis (polymyositis), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), temporal arteritis, Churg-Strauss syndrome†, polyarteritis nodosa, relapsing polychondritis, polymyalgia rheumatica, certain cases of vasculitis, or granulomatosis with polyangiitis†.

For the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Oral dosage Adults 0.5 to 0.7 mg/kg/dose PO once daily or less, initially. Taper dose gradually to 7.5 mg/day or less. Use the lowest effective dose. Infants, Children, and Adolescents 0.5 to 2 mg/kg/dose PO once daily, initially.

Taper dose gradually to 7.5 mg/day or less. Use the lowest effective dose. For the treatment of dermatomyositis or polymyositis. Oral dosage Adults 0.5 to 1 mg/kg/dose (Max: 100 mg/dose) PO once daily for at least 4 weeks, then taper dose over 6 to 12 weeks to the lowest dose that sustains remission. Depending on disease severity, lower doses may be used.

Infants, Children, and Adolescents 1 to 2 mg/kg/dose (Max: 60 mg/dose) PO once daily for at least 4 weeks, then taper dose over 12 to 24 months to the lowest dose that sustains remission. For the treatment of unspecified collagen disorders and mixed connective tissue disease†.

  • Oral dosage Adults 5 to 60 mg/day PO in 1 to 4 divided doses, depending upon disease being treated.
  • Individualize dose and titrate to response.
  • Initial doses needed may be high (60 mg/day or more).
  • After symptoms controlled, decrease dose slowly every 5 to 7 days.
  • Maintenance doses for chronic conditions are usually 10 to 20 mg PO once daily or 20 mg to 40 mg PO every other day.

Infants, Children, and Adolescents 0.05 mg/kg/day to 2 mg/kg/day PO in 1 to 4 divided doses. Individualize dose and titrate to response. For the treatment of primary amyloidosis† not associated with familial Mediterranean fever. Oral dosage Adults 0.8 mg/kg PO once daily for 7 days, in combination with melphalan; repeated every 6 weeks.

The treatment combination demonstrated superior results over colchicine alone in the treatment of primary amyloidosis. For the treatment of autoimmune hepatitis†. For the treatment of autoimmune hepatitis† as monotherapy. Oral dosage Adults 40 to 60 mg PO once daily, initially. When biochemical remission is achieved, taper dose by 2.5 to 5 mg/day every 2 to 4 weeks over 6 months to 5 to 10 mg/day or the lowest dose to maintain remission.

Guidelines recommend prednisone monotherapy for persons with acute severe autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) followed by liver transplantation if no improvement within 2 weeks. Addition of azathioprine may be considered after cholestasis is resolved. Infants, Children, Adolescents 1 to 2 mg/kg/dose (Max: 40 to 60 mg/dose) PO once daily, initially.

When biochemical remission is achieved, taper dose by 2.5 to 5 mg/day every 2 to 4 weeks over 6 months to 2.5 to 10 mg/day or the lowest dose to maintain remission. Guidelines recommend prednisone monotherapy for persons with acute severe autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) followed by liver transplantation if no improvement within 2 weeks.

Addition of azathioprine may be considered after cholestasis is resolved. For the treatment of autoimmune hepatitis† in combination with azathioprine. Oral dosage Adults 20 to 40 mg PO once daily, initially. When biochemical remission is achieved, taper dose by 2.5 to 5 mg/day every 2 to 4 weeks over 6 months to 5 to 10 mg/day or the lowest dose to maintain remission.

  1. Guidelines recommend prednisone in combination with azathioprine as first-line therapy in adults who present with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) who do not have cirrhosis, acute severe AIH, or acute liver failure.
  2. Add azathioprine after 2 weeks in persons with compensated cirrhosis.
  3. May attempt steroid withdrawal while continuing azathioprine.

Infants, Children, Adolescents 1 to 2 mg/kg/dose (Max: 20 to 40 mg/dose) PO once daily, initially. When biochemical remission is achieved, taper dose by 2.5 to 5 mg/day every 2 to 4 weeks over 6 months to 2.5 to 10 mg/day or the lowest dose to maintain remission.

  • Guidelines recommend prednisone in combination with azathioprine as first-line therapy in children who present with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) who do not have cirrhosis, acute severe AIH, or acute liver failure.
  • Add azathioprine after 2 weeks in persons with compensated cirrhosis.
  • May attempt steroid withdrawal while continuing azathioprine.
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For the treatment of acute or recurrent pericarditis†. For the treatment of acute pericarditis. Oral dosage Adults 0.2 to 0.5 mg/kg/dose PO once daily for 2 to 4 weeks in combination with colchicine in cases of contraindication or incomplete response to aspirin/NSAID, and when an infectious cause has been excluded, or when there is a specific indication such as autoimmune disease.

  1. Taper dose over at least 6 weeks.
  2. For the treatment of recurrent pericarditis†.
  3. Oral dosage Adults 0.2 to 0.5 mg/kg/dose PO once daily for 2 to 4 weeks in combination with aspirin/NSAID and colchicine in cases of incomplete response to aspirin/NSAID, and when an infectious cause has been excluded; limit to patients with specific indications, such as systemic inflammatory diseases, post-pericardiotomy syndromes, or pregnancy, or NSAID contraindications.

Taper dose over at least 6 weeks. For the treatment of acute interstitial nephritis (AIN)†. Oral dosage Adults, Adolescents, and Children There is variation in the literature with regard to dosage regimens. Prednisone 0.75 mg/kg/day to 1 mg/kg/day PO is commonly reported, followed by gradual taper over 3 to 6 weeks.

  • Use of IV methylprednisolone for a few days may precede oral corticosteroid use.
  • NOTE: Following biopsy to confirm diagnosis, corticosteroids are usually instituted soon afterward as an adjunctive measure; removal of the suspected offending agent /cause is the primary treatment.
  • While many case reports suggest a possible net benefit to the use of corticosteroids, some experts advocate for more prospective study of their value.

For use as an adjunct in the management of extradural malignant spinal cord compression† (MSCC†) associated with metastatic disease. Oral dosage Adults A range of 40 mg/day to 80 mg/day PO is suggested. Higher quality data are needed to establish the benefits vs.

risks and optimal dose and duration of therapy. Experts generally agree that patients who have neurologic deficits should receive a corticosteroid; many patients with MSCC require corticosteroids to help preserve neurologic function, such as ambulation. For the systemic treatment of ophthalmic inflammatory conditions such as endophthalmitis†, optic neuritis, allergic conjunctivitis, keratitis, allergic corneal ulcer, iritis, chorioretinitis, anterior segment inflammation, uveitis, choroiditis, or sympathetic ophthalmia.

Oral dosage Adults 5 to 60 mg/day PO administered in 1 to 4 divided doses, depending upon disease being treated. Topically applied corticosteroids are as effective as systemic corticosteroids for anterior ocular inflammation. Infants, Children, and Adolescents 0.14 to 2 mg/kg/day PO in 1 to 4 divided doses is the general initial dose range for prednisone (dose equivalent to prednisolone).

Topically applied corticosteroids are as effective as systemic corticosteroids for anterior ocular inflammation. For the treatment of Bell’s palsy†. Oral dosage Adults Common regimens from high-quality clinical trials include a prednisone or prednisolone dose of 60 mg PO per day for 5 days, followed by a 5-day taper or 25 mg PO twice daily for 10 days, in combination with appropriate antiviral treatment.1 mg/kg (up to 80 mg) PO once per day for 7 to 14 days, with an appropriate antiviral agent against herpes simplex virus (HSV), has also been recommended; if treatment is continued for 14 days, the prednisone dose can be tapered in the second week of treatment.

A prednisone dose of 410 mg PO administered in descending doses over 10 days has also been used with efficacy. The American Academy of Neurology notes that for new-onset Bell’s palsy, steroids are effective in increasing the probability of complete facial functional recovery according to data derived from class I (high quality) studies.

  1. For the adjunct treatment of West syndrome (infantile spasms†).
  2. Oral dosage Children up to 21 months and Infants The optimal dose of prednisone for infantile spasms has not been determined.
  3. The most frequently reported doses in the literature range from 1 mg/kg/day to 3 mg/kg/day PO.
  4. One study comparing low dose IM ACTH (20 International Units/m2) with prednisone 2 mg/kg/day PO reported no significant difference in response rates between the groups (spasm cessation in 42% and 33% of patients respectively).

Other studies using higher doses of IM ACTH (150 International Units/m2) in patients ranging from 2 to 21 months of age have shown ACTH therapy to be superior to prednisone. Based on the evidence currently available, the American Academy of Neurology and the Child Neurology Society’s practice parameters for the treatment of infantile spasms state that there is insufficient evidence that oral corticosteroids are effective in the treatment of infantile spasms.

  1. For the adjunct treatment of refractory seizures†, including absence seizures†, myoclonic seizures†, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome†, and other intractable seizure disorders†.
  2. Oral dosage Children and Infants 9 months and older There are limited data available for the treatment of refractory seizure types in pediatric patients.

The optimal dose of prednisone for adjunctive therapy of seizure disorders has not been determined. Doses of 0.3 mg/kg/day to 3 mg/kg/day PO have been used. One case series of 28 pediatric patients ages 2 to 10 years suggests that prednisone therapy may be an effective adjunct treatment for intractable generalized epilepsy.

  1. Prednisone 1 mg/kg/day PO was administered for 12 weeks in addition to each patient’s regular anticonvulsant regimen.
  2. Per parent diary, almost half of the study patients became seizure free, 36% had more than a 50% decrease in seizure frequency, and 18% had no change in seizure frequency.
  3. Treatment was most beneficial in those with absence seizures and early Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

In another retrospective case series, 32 mentally retarded children received various steroids for intractable epilepsy. Eight of those, ages 9 months to 6 years, received prednisone at varying doses and duration (0.3 to 3 mg/kg/day for a duration of 7 days to 24 months).

Two patients had 100% reduction in seizure frequency, 1 patient had a 50% to 75% reduction, and 5 patients had no change in seizure frequency as reported by parents and confirmed with EEG. All 3 patients who responded had complex partial seizures. Of those 3 patients, 2 relapsed in less than 1 month after prednisone discontinuation.

A non-randomized, non-blinded study compared IM ACTH 150 International Units/m2 for 1 week followed by an 11-week taper to prednisone 3 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks followed by 3 mg/kg every other day for 8 weeks, and then a 4-week taper. Infants and children with infantile spasms and children with other types of non-specified intractable seizures were included in the analysis.

The mean age of patients in the non-specified intractable seizures group was 42.5 months. The investigators found that prednisone was effective in 59% (n = 13) of patients with infantile spasms who had a hypsarrhythmic EEG abnormality. Prednisone was reported to be ineffective in all 30 patients with other seizure types.

For the treatment of heart transplant rejection†. Oral dosage Adults Guidelines recommend 1 mg/kg/day to 3 mg/kg/day PO for 3 to 5 days for asymptomatic mild or moderate acute cellular rejection (ISHLT 1R or 2R). A corticosteroid taper may be considered.

  1. Not first-line for symptomatic rejection (ISHLT 1R, 2R, or 3R) or for asymptomatic severe rejection (ISHLT 3R).
  2. For the management of heart transplant rejection prophylaxis†.
  3. Oral dosage Adults One study used prednisone 0.5 mg/kg/day to 1 mg/kg/day PO initially, then 0.3 mg/kg/day to 0.5 mg/kg/day by day 21 after transplantation and at least 0.1 mg/kg/day by month 6 with cyclosporine (up to 12 mg/kg/day divided twice daily) and either azathioprine (1 mg/kg/day to 3 mg/kg/day PO/IV with a maximum of 300 mg/day) or everolimus (0.75 mg or 1.5 mg PO twice daily).

Cyclosporine target trough concentrations were 250 to 400 ng/mL for weeks 1 through 4, 200 to 350 ng/mL for weeks 5 through 24, and 100 to 300 ng/mL for weeks 25 through 96. Guidelines state corticosteroid avoidance, early corticosteroid weaning, or very low dose maintenance corticosteroid therapy are all acceptable therapeutic approaches.

When corticosteroids are used, if no rejection episodes in the past 6 months have occurred and significant corticosteroid side effects are present, attempt corticosteroid weaning. Corticosteroid withdrawal can be successfully achieved 3 to 6 months after transplantation in many patients such as older patients, non-multiparous women, and those without circulating anti-HLA antibodies or rejection history.

For adjunct therapy in patients with chorioretinitis associated with congenital toxoplasmosis†. Oral dosage Infants and Children 0.5 mg/kg/dose PO twice daily (Max: 20 mg/dose) with rapid taper in combination with pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, and leucovorin is recommended for patients with severe chorioretinitis by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines.

Neonates 0.5 mg/kg/dose PO twice daily in combination with pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, and leucovorin is recommended for patients with CSF protein 1 g/dL or more or severe chorioretinitis in vision-threatening macular area. Initiate prednisone after 72 hours of anti-Toxoplasma therapy and continue until CSF protein is less than 1 g/dL or resolution of severe chorioretinitis.

For adjunct therapy in patients with Mycobacterium avium complex infection† (MAC) experiencing moderate to severe immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Oral dosage Adults 20 to 40 mg PO once daily for 4 to 8 weeks can be considered for patients with moderate to severe immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS).

  • For the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL)†.
  • For the first-line treatment of PTCL in combination with gemcitabine, cisplatin, and thalidomide†.
  • Oral dosage Adults and Adolescents 14 years and older 60 mg/m2 orally on days 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 in combination with gemcitabine (800 mg/m2 IV over 30 minutes on days 1 and 8), cisplatin (25 mg/m2 IV on days 1, 2, and 3), and thalidomide (200 mg orally daily) repeated every 21 days until disease progression or for up to 6 cycles was evaluated in patients with previously untreated PTCL in a randomized trial.

Patients received aspirin 100 mg orally daily during thalidomide therapy. The use of granulocyte colony-stimulation factor was permitted as indicated. For the treatment of previously untreated CD30-expressing PTCL, in combination with brentuximab vedotin, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin†.

  1. NOTE: Brentuximab vedotin is FDA approved in combination with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisone for this indication.
  2. Oral dosage Adults 100 mg orally daily on days 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 in combination with brentuximab vedotin 1.8 mg/kg (not to exceed 180 mg/dose) IV on day 1, cyclophosphamide 750 mg/m2 IV on day 1, and doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 IV on day 1 given every 21 days for 6 to 8 cycles of therapy.

The progression-free survival time (evaluated via an independent review facility) was significantly improved in patients with CD30-expressing systemic anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (sALCL) or PTCL who received brentuximab vedotin plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisone (CHP) compared with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) (48.2 months vs.20.8 months; hazard ratio (HR) = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.93) in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial (the ECHELON-2 trial; n = 452).

  1. Overall survival was also significantly improved in the brentuximab vedotin-containing arm (HR = 0.66; 95% CI, 0.46 to 0.95).
  2. In this trial, 70% of patients had sALCL and 30% of patients had PTCL (e.g., including PTCL not otherwise specified (16%), angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (12%), adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (2%), and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (less than 1%)).

For the treatment of Kawasaki disease†. Oral dosage Infants, Children, and Adolescents 2 mg/kg/day PO in 3 divided doses until CRP is normalized, then taper over 2 to 3 weeks. This regimen, administered after an initial course of IV steroids that is continued until the patient is afebrile and concurrently with IVIG (2 grams/kg IV once) and aspirin, may be considered for primary treatment of high-risk patients with acute disease or in the retreatment of patients who have recurrent or recrudescent fever after initial IVIG treatment.

  • For the treatment of systemic anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (sALCL)†.
  • For the treatment of previously untreated sALCL, in combination with brentuximab vedotin, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin†.
  • NOTE: Brentuximab vedotin is FDA approved in combination with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisone for this indication.

Oral dosage Adults 100 mg orally daily on days 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 in combination with brentuximab vedotin 1.8 mg/kg (not to exceed 180 mg/dose) IV on day 1, cyclophosphamide 750 mg/m2 IV on day 1, and doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 IV on day 1 given every 21 days for 6 to 8 cycles of therapy.

The progression-free survival (PFS) time (evaluated via an independent review facility) was significantly improved in patients with CD30-expressing sALCL or peripheral T-cell lymphoma who received brentuximab vedotin plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisone (CHP) compared with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) (48.2 months vs.20.8 months; hazard ratio (HR) = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.93) in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial (the ECHELON-2 trial; n = 452).

Overall survival was also significantly improved in the brentuximab vedotin-containing arm (HR = 0.66; 95% CI, 0.46 to 0.95). In patients with sALCL (n = 314; anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-negative sALCL, 48%; ALK-positive sALCL, 22%), the PFS times were 55.7 months and 54.2 months in patients who received brentuximab vedotin plus CHP and CHOP, respectively (HR = 0.59; 95% CI, 0.42 to 0.84).

  1. For the treatment of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP)†.
  2. Oral dosage Adults 40 to 60 mg PO 2 to 3 times daily; taper dose after 5 to 7 days over 1 to 2 weeks.
  3. A suggested taper is 40 mg PO twice daily on days 1 to 5; then 40 mg PO once daily on days 6 to 10; then 20 mg PO once daily on days 11 to 21.
  4. Start therapy as early as possible and within 72 hours after starting specific PCP therapy.

Recommended for patients with moderate to severe infection, defined by a PaO2 less than 70 mmHg at room air or an alveolar-arterial DO2 gradient of 35 mmHg or more. The benefits of starting corticosteroids after 72 hours are unclear. Adolescents 40 to 60 mg PO 2 to 3 times daily; taper dose after 5 to 7 days over 1 to 2 weeks.

  • A suggested taper is 40 mg PO twice daily on days 1 to 5; then 40 mg PO once daily on days 6 to 10; then 20 mg PO once daily on days 11 to 21.
  • Start therapy as early as possible and within 72 hours after starting specific PCP therapy.
  • Recommended for patients with moderate to severe infection, defined by a PaO2 less than 70 mmHg at room air or an alveolar-arterial DO2 gradient of 35 mmHg or more.

The benefits of starting corticosteroids after 72 hours are unclear. Infants and Children 1 mg/kg/dose PO twice daily on days 1 to 5; then 0.5 to 1 mg/kg/dose PO twice daily on days 6 to 10; then 0.5 mg/kg/dose PO once daily on days 11 to 21. Start therapy as early as possible and within 72 hours after starting specific PCP therapy.

Recommended for patients with moderate to severe infection, defined by a PaO2 less than 70 mmHg at room air or an alveolar-arterial DO2 gradient more than 35 mmHg. For the treatment of pharyngitis†. Oral dosage Adults 60 mg PO once daily for 1 to 2 days. Children and Adolescents 5 to 17 years 2 mg/kg/dose (Max: 60 mg/dose) PO once daily for 1 to 2 days.

For the treatment of cellulitis† in nondiabetic persons. Oral dosage Adults 40 mg PO once daily for 7 days. For the treatment of e-cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury†. Oral dosage Adults 40 to 60 mg PO once daily, initially, followed by a taper such as 20 mg PO once daily for 1 week, then 10 mg PO once daily for 1 week; base length of steroid taper on patient’s clinical course of recovery and close follow-up.

Adolescents 40 to 60 mg PO once daily, initially, followed by a taper such as 20 mg PO once daily for 1 week, then 10 mg PO once daily for 1 week; base length of steroid taper on patient’s clinical course of recovery and close follow-up. For the treatment of encephalitis†. For the treatment of viral encephalitis† as adjunctive therapy.

Oral dosage Adults 1 mg/kg/dose (Max: 60 to 80 mg/dose) PO once daily for 3 to 5 days. Infants, Children, and Adolescents 1 mg/kg/dose (Max: 60 to 80 mg/dose) PO once daily for 3 to 5 days. For the treatment of immune-mediated encephalitis† as step-down therapy.

  1. Oral dosage Adults 0.5 to 2 mg/kg/dose (Max: 60 mg/dose) PO once daily, followed by an extended taper over up to 12 months.
  2. Infants, Children, and Adolescents 0.5 to 2 mg/kg/dose (Max: 60 mg/dose) PO once daily, followed by an extended taper over up to 12 months.
  3. For the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome†.

Oral dosage Adults 10 mg PO 3 times daily for up to 12 weeks, followed by a taper. For the treatment of complications associated with infectious mononucleosis† secondary to Epstein-Barr virus infection†. Oral dosage Adults 60 to 80 mg/day PO administered in two divided doses and tapered over 1 to 2 weeks has been used to treat complications including airway obstruction due to tonsillar enlargement; autoimmune hemolytic anemia, severe thrombocytopenia, and aplastic anemia; CNS involvement; myocarditis; and pericarditis.

For the treatment of alcohol-associated hepatitis†. Oral dosage Adults 40 mg PO once daily in persons with severe alcohol-associated hepatitis (Maddrey discriminant function of 32 or more; model for end-stage liver disease score more than 20) to improve 28-day mortality. For the treatment of pain associated with postherpetic neuralgia†.

Oral dosage Adults 60 mg PO once daily for days 1 to 7; 30 mg PO once daily for days 8 to 14; 15 mg PO once daily for days 15 to 21. For the treatment of neurocysticercosis† as adjunctive therapy in combination with antiparasitics. Oral dosage Adults 1 to 2 mg/kg/day PO starting 3 days before antiparasitics and continuing for the duration of therapy.

Titrate based on clinical response. Taper over 6 to 8 weeks after antiparasitic therapy is complete to avoid rebound symptoms. Children and Adolescents 1 to 2 mg/kg/day PO starting 3 days before antiparasitics and continuing for the duration of therapy. Titrate based on clinical response. Taper over 6 to 8 weeks after antiparasitic therapy is complete to avoid rebound symptoms,

For the treatment of celiac disease†. Oral dosage Adults 0.5 to 1 mg/kg/dose PO once daily. †Indicates off-label use

Can I take prednisone for only 5 days?

The good news is that if you’re taking this medication for a short time — say, less than 5 days — you’ll likely have few, if any, side effects, says Soliman. There’s no limit on how long you can take prednisone.

How long does it take for 10 mg of prednisone to start working?

How to Take It – Dosing of prednisone varies depending on the state of the disease being treated. Doses used in rheumatoid arthritis are commonly 5–10 mg daily, while doses needed in lupus and vasculitis are often 60-80 mg daily, or sometimes higher. The dose is usually decided based on your weight and disease manifestations.

  1. Prednisone usually achieves its effect within 1–2 hours.
  2. The delayed release tablets take effect about 6 hours after taking the dose.
  3. Prednisone stops working soon after stopping the medication.
  4. If you have been taking prednisone regularly for longer than 2 weeks, do not stop it suddenly because you could develop adrenal insufficiency.

Instead, you should discuss a tapering schedule with your rheumatology provider.

How long does 10mg prednisone last?

How long does prednisone stay in your system? Medically reviewed by, Last updated on Nov 2, 2022. You could expect a dose of to stay in your system for 16.5 to 22 hours. The elimination half life of prednisone is around 3 to 4 hours. This is the time it takes for your body to reduce the plasma levels by half.

  1. How much and how often you have taken the drug.
  2. Your metabolic rate – a slower metabolism will increase the time a drug remains in your system.
  3. Your age and health – older age and poor health will generally increase the time the drug stays in your system.
  4. Body mass – generally the bigger you are the longer a drug will remain in your system.

For more information see:

Does prednisone 10 mg make you sleepy?

Does prednisone make you sleepy? Prednisone does not usually cause sleepiness but may make you feel dizzy, irritable with mood swings, or cause you to have trouble sleeping (insomnia). If your dose is stopped too quickly or if you take prednisone for a long period of time you may feel severely fatigued.

Do not stop taking prednisone unless directed to do so by your doctor. Don’t drive or operate machinery if you feel tired. is often given to treat inflammatory flare-ups of medical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, asthma or severe skin rashes.

You may feel sleepy or tired while you recover. If your tiredness does not improve, contact your healthcare provider. What are the most common central nervous system side effects with prednisone?

Anxiety Confusion Dizziness Depression Headache Feeling happy or energized “Jittery” or shaky feeling Seizures Trouble sleeping Mood or personality changes Vertigo or a feeling of “spinning”

Call your healthcare provider right away if you have: shortness of breath, severe stomach pain, blood in your stools; black or tar-colored stools, severe depression, severe changes in your personality, mood or behavior; or trouble with your eyes, vision or eye pain.

This is not all the information you need to know about for safe and effective use and does not take the place of your doctor’s directions. Review the full prednisone product and patient information and discuss this information and any questions you have with your doctor or other health care provider.

: Does prednisone make you sleepy?

How does prednisone 10 mg make you feel?

Taking prednisone for a short period of time can cause side effects like changes in appetite and mood, sweating, and trouble sleeping. People taking it long term can experience weight gain, high blood pressure, cataracts, and osteoporosis. Thinner skin and getting sick more often are also common complaints.

Can I stop taking prednisone after 1 day?

How and when do you stop taking prednisone, a steroid to treat inflammation ? Even if you have side effects from the medication, don’t stop cold turkey or cut back the dose on your own if you’ve been on it more than a few weeks. You could go into steroid withdrawal, which can have severe symptoms.

  1. It’s safer to taper off prednisone.
  2. Your doctor will gradually lower your dose.
  3. Tapering helps prevent withdrawal and stop your inflammation from coming back.
  4. As you taper, you may notice subtle symptoms.
  5. Let your doctor know if you do.
  6. They’ll watch you carefully and adjust your prednisone taper dose if needed.

Prednisone withdrawal may cause symptoms like:

Severe fatigue Joint pain Fever Stiff or tender musclesBody achesLightheaded feelingNo appetiteLabored breathing Vomiting Weight loss Headaches Adrenal crisis, a rare, possibly fatal reaction to a lack of steroid hormone in your body

Withdrawal could also lead to serious psychological symptoms like depression, anxiety, mood swings, mania, or delirium. Your adrenal glands make a steroid called cortisol that’s similar to prednisone. Your body needs cortisol to function. When you take prednisone for more than a few weeks, your adrenal glands make way less cortisol.

If you stop prednisone or taper too quickly, your body won’t have enough of the steroid it needs. Your withdrawal symptoms are due to that sudden steroid shortage. When you taper off prednisone, your adrenal glands have time to catch up and make normal levels of cortisol. This could take weeks or even months, depending on how long you took the medication or how high your dose was.

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Even a tapered dose of prednisone helps prevent inflammation, which is why you took the steroid in the first place. The doctor will give you a schedule to gradually lower your dose. Follow it carefully. They’ll let you know when it’s safe to stop prednisone altogether.

It’s normal to feel some mild symptoms for about a week or two as you taper off prednisone. Don’t take any OTC pain medicine or prescription drugs without asking your doctor first. Psychological withdrawal symptoms could last for 2 to 8 weeks. The doctor may give you blood tests to check your cortisol levels as you taper off prednisone.

You may need to taper off more slowly or go back to your regular dose if you have severe symptoms. Take these steps to help control withdrawal symptoms:

Exercise, If you feel up to it, a slow walk or some stretches may help your aches and pain. Muscles and joints stiffen up if you don’t move them for too long. Gentle yoga or warm-water pool exercise may help, too. Physical therapy, The doctor can prescribe physical therapy to treat pain and teach you safe ways to move your body. Meditation and counseling, Meditation may help calm anxiety and center your mind. Talk to a therapist, family member, or friend about your feelings to help you feel that you’re not alone.

Wondering if you can get off steroids faster? Maybe. If you’ve only taken prednisone for 3 weeks or less, you might not have to taper. The doctor will let you know. If you’ve been on steroids for more than a year, it may take 2 months to taper off. Don’t try to speed up the taper on your own.

What to avoid while taking prednisone?

Increased Calorie Intake – Prednisone increases appetite, resulting in increased calorie intake. This increased appetite can be difficult to control. Below are a few tips for controlling the amount of calories and the quality of nutrients you eat: Eat small, frequent meals of high nutritional value.

Eat a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. There is evidence that a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet is at least as effective for losing weight as a traditional low-calorie diet that’s low in fat and portion-controlled. A high-protein diet may also help suppress appetite. Eat carbohydrates in the form of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Prednisone has a tendency to raise the level of glucose, or sugar, in the blood, which can cause increased body fat or diabetes in some people. It is important to avoid “simple” carbohydrates and concentrated sweets, such as cakes, pies, cookies, jams, honey, chips, breads, candy and other highly processed foods.

  1. This helps keep blood sugar low.
  2. Limit saturated fat and cholesterol.
  3. Choose lean meats, poultry and fish.
  4. Avoid fried foods and foods with extra oil, butter, margarine, mayonnaise and the like.
  5. Eat foods rich in calcium.
  6. Prednisone may alter your body’s ability to use calcium.
  7. Try to get four servings of calcium-rich foods per day to help prevent osteoporosis.

Check with your doctor to see if you would benefit from calcium supplements. Foods rich in calcium include:

Calcium-fortified orange juice Cheese (American, Swiss, Colby, Cheddar and Jack) Cottage cheese Milk Non-fat dry milk powder Oranges Sardines (canned, with bones) Shrimp Yoghurt

Does your body go back to normal after prednisone?

Prednisone Withdrawal Timeline – When stopping any medication, it’s important to listen to your doctor’s instructions on how to do it most safely. When it comes to stopping prednisone, the recommendation is that you slowly taper off to avoid withdrawals.

The best way to do this is under the supervision of a medical professional, whether your physician or you go through a treatment center designed to help people detox from drugs. One of the important things our bodies are supposed to make is cortisol, but unfortunately, not everyone makes enough of it on their own.

Luckily prednisone is a steroid that is very similar to cortisol and can help with what cortisol is supposed to do, like reduce swelling and inflammation. Prednisone also works extremely quickly, making it perfect for acute and chronic conditions. Unfortunately, if you take prednisone for an extended time, your body will start making less cortisol after a few weeks.

If you take things slowly and taper off the prednisone, your adrenal glands can catch up and start making normal cortisol levels. This could be just a few weeks before you’re at a safe level, or it could be months. Tapering the steroids under the supervision of your doctor is the safest way to go. They can give you a schedule that helps you lower your dose over time.

They’ll be able to monitor you and make sure you are truly ready to be off of it before you stop, as well. As you begin the tapering process, it is normal to feel mild withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms generally last one to two weeks as you are tapering.

Are small doses of prednisone safe?

What are the side effects of low dose prednisone? , — Sep 21, 2020 Ask the Expert: What are the side effects of taking a low dose prednisone every day? It’s the only thing that helps with my pain, but I hear it’s not a long-term solution? Prednisone belongs to the class of medications known as corticosteroids (or anti-inflammatory agents). These medications provide relief of inflammation and are used to treat a variety of medical conditions including pain, asthma, Sjögren’s and rheumatoid arthritis. As with all medications, corticosteroids have some adverse side effects related to the dose and the duration in which the medication is taken. Side effects associated with low dose (7.5 mg/day or less) daily prednisone are less severe than those seen with higher doses (greater than 30mg/day) and can usually be managed with precautions. Common side effects of daily low dose prednisone include elevated blood pressure, swelling, changes in blood sugar, increased appetite, weight gain, insomnia, osteoporosis (thinning of bones), irregular menstrual periods, and mood changes. Serious side effects associated with higher doses and long-term use (greater than 1 month) are impaired wound healing, decreased growth (in children), decreased muscle production, fat deposits, stomach ulcers or bleeding, vision problems, higher risk for infection, and in rare cases life-threatening allergic reactions. Although the list of side effects may make you wonder whether you should take this medication or not, please be reassured that many people take daily low dose prednisone with minor or no side effects. The following self-care tips may help minimize some of the side effects associated with prednisone. For those experiencing swelling and/or elevated blood pressure, a healthy low sodium diet, regular exercise, and stress management can help to keep your blood pressure under control while taking daily low dose prednisone. If you have diabetes, it is important to monitor your blood sugar and report any severe fluctuations in blood sugar to your provider. It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food or milk to minimize stomach upset and reduce the chance of stomach ulceration. Schedule yearly eye exams and report any new changes in vision to your eye doctor. Long term corticosteroid therapy may cause thinning of bones (osteoporosis) which increases the risk of bone fracture. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about and calcium supplementation to help protect your bones. Since long term prednisone use can increase your risk for infection, ask your doctor or pharmacist to review your vaccination history and be sure to stay up to date on all of your recommended vaccines. Alert your family members and friends about the possibility of mood changes associated with this medication, so they can help detect any unusual changes in your behavior. Report any changes in mood or behavior to your doctor. Although experiencing side effects is unpleasant, it is crucial to avoid sudden discontinuation of this medication. Never stop or decrease your dose unless instructed by your doctor. Your doctor can instruct you on how to slowly decrease your dose if you need to stop taking this medication for any reason. By Ajay John, Pharmacy Intern and Kayli Smith, Pharm.D This article was first printed in the Foundation’s patient newsletter for members. Help support the Sjögren’s Foundation by donating today! Not only will your donation help fund critical research, educational opportunities and support the Foundation’s mission to create ‘a community where patients, healthcare professionals, and researchers come together to conquer the complexities of Sjögren’s’ but it is also 100% tax deductible.

What does prednisone 10 mg do for your body?

What is this medication? – PREDNISONE (PRED ni sone) treats many conditions such as asthma, allergic reactions, arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, adrenal, and blood or bone marrow disorders. It works by decreasing inflammation, slowing down an overactive immune system, or replacing cortisol normally made in the body.

How many mg of prednisone is safe per day?

Dosing – The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

For oral dosage form (solution, suspension, syrup, tablets):

Dose depends on medical condition:

Adults—At first, 5 to 60 milligrams (mg) per day. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed. Children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The dose is usually 0.14 to 2 mg per kilogram (kg) of body weight per day, divided and taken 3 or 4 times a day. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed.

Can I take prednisone for only 5 days?

The good news is that if you’re taking this medication for a short time — say, less than 5 days — you’ll likely have few, if any, side effects, says Soliman. There’s no limit on how long you can take prednisone.

Can I stop prednisone after 5 days?

Key Points –

The best prednisone taper will depend upon how long you have been taking the medicine, your dose, and why you are being treated. If you’ve been treated with a high dose of prednisone, or taken it for more than a few weeks, you will need to slowly stop your medicine, usually over a period of days, weeks or months to help prevent withdrawal side effects. Abruptly stopping prednisone or tapering too quickly can lead to withdrawal side effects like fatigue, joint pain, mood swings or may worsen your medical condition. In some cases, adrenal crisis can occur, which is a life-threatening emergency. Your healthcare provider will determine your prednisone tapering schedule.

Do not stop or taper prednisone without speaking to your doctor first. Prednisone, a glucocorticoid, is typically prescribed to treat inflammatory medical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, asthma, eye problems, immune system disorders or severe allergies and skin rashes.

What will 10mg of prednisone do?

9383 Medication name Generic name: Prednisone – oral Pronunciation (PRED-ni-sone) Brand name(s) Deltasone Uses Prednisone is used to treat conditions such as arthritis, blood disorders, breathing problems, severe allergies, skin diseases, cancer, eye problems, and immune system disorders.

Prednisone belongs to a class of drugs known as corticosteroids. It decreases your immune system’s response to various diseases to reduce symptoms such as swelling and allergic-type reactions. Other uses This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional.

Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional. Prednisone may also be used for COVID-19, but is only effective in hospitalized patients who need supplemental oxygen or a mechanical ventilator to breathe.

How to use Take this medication by mouth, with food or milk to prevent stomach upset, as directed by your doctor. Take the tablet form of this medication with a full glass of water (8 ounces/240 milliliters) unless your doctor directs you otherwise. If you are using the liquid form of this medication, carefully measure the dose using a special measuring device/spoon.

Do not use a household spoon because you may not get the correct dose. If you are prescribed only one dose per day, take it in the morning before 9 A.M. Take this medication exactly as directed by your doctor. Follow the dosing schedule carefully. The dosage and length of treatment are based on your medical condition and response to treatment.

If you are taking this medication on a different schedule than a daily one (such as every other day), it may help to mark your calendar with a reminder. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Some conditions may become worse when this drug is suddenly stopped. Also, you may experience symptoms such as weakness, weight loss, nausea, muscle pain, headache, tiredness, dizziness.

To prevent these symptoms while you are stopping treatment with this drug, your doctor may reduce your dose gradually. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details. Report any new or worsening symptoms right away. Tell your doctor if your condition lasts or gets worse.

Side effects Nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, heartburn, trouble sleeping, increased sweating, or acne may occur. If any of these effects last or get worse, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly. Remember that this medication has been prescribed because your doctor has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects.

Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects. Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including:

muscle pain/cramps irregular heartbeat weakness swelling hands/ankles/feet unusual weight gain signs of infection (such as sore throat that doesn’t go away, fever) vision problems (such as blurred vision) symptoms of stomach/intestinal bleeding (such as stomach/abdominal pain, black/tarry stools, vomit that looks like coffee grounds) mental/mood changes (such as depression, mood swings, agitation) slow wound healing thinning skin bone pain menstrual period changes puffy face seizures easy bruising/bleeding

This medication may rarely make your blood sugar rise, which can cause or worsen diabetes. Tell your doctor right away if you have symptoms of high blood sugar such as increased thirst/urination. If you already have diabetes, check your blood sugar regularly as directed and share the results with your doctor.

rash itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat) severe dizziness trouble breathing

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. In the US – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345. Precautions Before taking prednisone, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems.

Talk to your pharmacist for more details. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of:

current/past infections (such as fungal infections, tuberculosis, herpes) heart problems (such as heart failure, recent heart attack) high blood pressure thyroid problems kidney disease liver disease stomach/intestinal problems (such as ulcer, diverticulitis) bone loss (osteoporosis) mental/mood disorders (such as psychosis, anxiety, depression) eye diseases (such as cataracts, glaucoma) diabetes mineral imbalance (such as low level of potassium/calcium in the blood) seizures blood clots bleeding problems

Using corticosteroid medications for a long time can make it more difficult for your body to respond to physical stress. Before having surgery or emergency treatment, or if you get a serious illness/injury, tell your doctor or dentist that you are using this medication or have used this medication within the past 12 months.

Tell your doctor right away if you develop unusual/extreme tiredness or weight loss. If you will be using this medication for a long time, carry a warning card or medical ID bracelet that identifies your use of this medication. Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

This medication may mask signs of infection. It can make you more likely to get infections or may make current infections worse. Stay away from anyone who has an infection that may easily spread (such as chickenpox, COVID-19, measles, flu). Talk to your doctor if you have been exposed to an infection or for more details.

  1. The liquid form of this medication may contain sugar and/or alcohol.
  2. Caution is advised if you have diabetes, liver disease, or any other condition that requires you to limit/avoid these substances in your diet.
  3. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about using this product safely.
  4. Tell your health care professional that you are using prednisone before having any immunizations/vaccinations.

Avoid contact with people who have recently received live vaccines (such as flu vaccine inhaled through the nose). This medicine may cause stomach bleeding. Daily use of alcohol while using this medicine may increase your risk for stomach bleeding. Limit alcoholic beverages.

Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially bone loss/pain, stomach/intestinal bleeding, and mental/mood changes (such as confusion). This medication may slow down a child’s growth if used for a long time. Consult the doctor or pharmacist for more details.

See the doctor regularly so your child’s height and growth can be checked. During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. It may rarely harm an unborn baby. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Infants born to mothers who have been using this medication for an extended period of time may have hormone problems.

  • Tell your doctor right away if you notice symptoms such as nausea/vomiting that doesn’t stop, severe diarrhea, or weakness in your newborn.
  • This medication passes into breast milk but is unlikely to harm a nursing infant.
  • Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.
  • Drug interactions Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects.

This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.

aldesleukin mifepristone drugs that can cause bleeding/bruising (including antiplatelet drugs such as clopidogrel, “blood thinners” such as dabigatran/warfarin, NSAIDs such as aspirin/celecoxib/ibuprofen)

If your doctor has directed you to take low-dose aspirin for heart attack or stroke prevention (usually 81-162 milligrams a day), you should continue taking it unless your doctor instructs you otherwise. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

This medication may interfere with certain lab tests (such as skin tests), possibly causing false test results. Make sure lab personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug. Overdose If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away.

US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Notes Do not share this medication with others. If this medication is used for an extended time, lab and/or medical tests (such as blood mineral levels, blood glucose, complete blood count, height/weight measurements, bone density tests, blood pressure, eye exams) should be done while you are taking this medication.

  1. Eep all medical and lab appointments.
  2. Consult your doctor for more details This medication may cause bone problems (osteoporosis) when taken for an extended time.
  3. Lifestyle changes that may help reduce the risk of bone problems include doing weight-bearing exercise, getting enough calcium and vitamin D, stopping smoking, and limiting alcohol.

Discuss with your doctor lifestyle changes that might benefit you. Missed dose If you are taking this medication daily and miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose. Take your next dose at the regular time.

  • Do not double the dose to catch up.
  • If you are taking this medication on a different schedule than a daily one (such as every other day), ask your doctor ahead of time about what you should do if you miss a dose.
  • Storage Store at room temperature away from light and moisture.
  • Do not store in the bathroom.

Keep all medications away from children and pets. Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.

  1. Medical alert Your condition can cause complications in a medical emergency.
  2. For information about enrolling in MedicAlert, call 1-888-633-4298 (US) or 1-800-668-1507 (Canada).
  3. Important note HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product.
  4. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you.

This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs. Information last revised June 2023.

Can you take prednisone for 5 days and stop?

Proper Use – Drug information provided by: Merative, Micromedex ® Take this medicine exactly as directed by your doctor. Do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered. To do so may increase the chance for unwanted effects.

Take this medicine with food or milk to avoid stomach irritation. Swallow the delayed-release tablet whole. Do not crush, break, or chew it. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Prednisone Intensol™ solution is a concentrated liquid.

Measure the concentrated liquid with the special oral dropper that comes with the package. If you use this medicine for a long time, do not suddenly stop using it without checking first with your doctor. You may need to slowly decrease your dose before stopping it completely.