How To Know If Toenail Fungus Is Dying
Toenail Fungus Treatment & How to Tell if Toenail Fungus is Dying – Unfortunately, there are no home remedies for toenail fungus and fungal infections require either over-the-counter or prescribed medications to clear. Thankfully, your local podiatrist can recommend an antifungal cream from your local drug store or prescribe a medication that will clear the infection quickly.

  1. You’ll know that the medication is working and the toenail fungus is dying when your toenail changes back to its natural color, decreases in thickness, shows healthy new growth, and you see a clear delineation between the infected part of the toenail and your new nail growth.
  2. If you think you may have a toenail infection, don’t wait to see a local podiatrist for treatment.

Early diagnosis and treatment are the easiest and fastest way to clear up a fungal infection.

How do you know when your toenail fungus is healing?

2. Nail Thickness Decreases – Toenails infected by fungus typically become thick and brittle. This can make them difficult to cut and painful to walk around with. If the medication you’re using is working, though, that will start to change. The second noticeable sign that your toenail fungus is healing is that your nails will start to return to their normal thickness.

How I killed my toenail fungus?

Natural Treatment for Toenail Fungus: Hydrogen Peroxide – Hydrogen can kill the fungus that grows on toenails, causing the unsightly disfigurement that comes with this condition. There are two common ways to use hydrogen peroxide to treat your toenail fungus.

Wipe hydrogen peroxide directly on the infected area with a clean cloth or cotton swab. Add 1/8 of a cup of hydrogen peroxide to four cups of cool water. Soak the infected feet for 10-20 minutes, and then pat dry with a clean cloth.

Is it OK to live with toenail fungus?

Dear Doctor: I had toenail fungus two years ago, and my doctor prescribed Lamisil. It took a long time, but it worked. Now the fungus, which is so ugly, is back again. Why is it so hard to get rid of, and are there any new treatments available? Dear Reader: Toenail fungus is fairly common, but that’s not much consolation to the 6 million or so people in the United States who have to put up with it.

It’s an often-unsightly infection caused by a microscopic organism called a dermatophyte that lives beneath the toenail. More precisely, it colonizes the portion of the nail known as the matrix, which is underneath the cuticle. Initial symptoms are a yellowish or brownish discoloration of the toenail.

As the infection progresses, nails will often become thickened, crumbly and malformed. Although the fungus affects the appearance of the nails, it actually lives on the layer directly beneath the toenail. That’s why it’s so difficult to treat. Your nails are made up of keratin, a tough, fibrous protein.

The same hard shell that protects your toes is giving shelter to the fungus. For topical medications to be successful in killing the fungus, they have to be able to reach it. Anti-fungal creams and liquids are available, both in over-the-counter preparations and by prescription. But because nails are not porous, it’s difficult for the medication to reach the infection in concentrations great enough to kill the fungus.

As a result, success rates for topical treatments are low. Systemic medications, like the Lamisil your physician prescribed, take a more direct approach. You swallow the pill, it gets digested, and the medication enters your bloodstream. Your circulatory system delivers the medication directly to the fungus living beneath your toenail and, in the best-case scenario, kills it.

However, there are drawbacks. Side effects can include headache, nausea and diarrhea. In rare cases, the drug can cause liver damage, so blood tests to monitor potential toxicity are needed. These infections are quite persistent, and your experience with recurrence is fairly typical. Although oral medications are the most effective, reported failure rates are as high as 20 to 30 percent.

Nail growth is slow, which means treatment is a lengthy process. A big toenail can take anywhere from a year to 18 months for new growth to completely replace the old, infected nail. Oral treatment for toenail fungus generally lasts 12 weeks. Topical preparations must be applied for at least a year.

  • Nail fungus is not a health risk to most people.
  • But anyone with a compromised immune system, such as a diabetic who contracts nail fungus, is at risk of developing serious complications like foot ulcers.
  • Therefore, it’s vital that diabetics seek medical treatment.
  • As for your question about new treatments, some physicians and podiatrists offer laser treatment of toenail fungus.

Although some patients report good results, reliable data about the long-term efficacy of laser treatment is scarce. Our recommendation is that you meet with your primary care physician, who will want to do a physical exam of the affected area. Then you can discuss the specifics of the recurrence and evaluate which of the existing treatments are best for you at this time.

Should I cut off toenail fungus?

Your Options for Treating Toenail Fungus – If you think you may have toenail fungus, you should see a podiatrist or dermatologist, who will send a specimen or a piece of your nail to a lab. Different types of fungus are treated slightly differently, so it’s important to know which type you have, says Sundling.

Trimming the Toenail Trimming the toenail is usually combined with medication, but having a podiatrist periodically trim the nail down is helpful and allows the medication to work better, says Sundling. (Most of the time, the nail gets so thick that you can’t trim it yourself, she adds.) Prescription Topical Medications These are used the same way you would use nail polish. One such medication, efinaconazole, has about a 50 percent success rate, says Sundling, and you must use it every day for 48 weeks. Another similar medication, ciclopirox, has a 20 percent success rate, and you must use it for 11 to 12 months, she adds. One caveat: If you like painting your toenails with regular nail polish, you won’t be able to do so for the whole time you’re using these medicines. Oral Medications Terbinafine is an oral medication that you take every day for three months, and it’s up to 70 percent effective, says Sundling. But it can have severe liver side effects, so if you’ve ever had liver disease, risk factors for liver disease, or are taking other medication that is processed through liver, like cholesterol medication, you can’t take it, she warns. Itraconazole is another oral medication for toenail fungus. It’s 50 percent effective, and you take it for three months, says Sundling. Nail Removal Sometimes completely removing the toenail is seen as a treatment option for toenail fungus, says Sundling. There are two ways to do it: Permanently, so it never grows back (and then you won’t have a toenail anymore), or you can let it grow back in. Sometimes it grows back in as a healthy nail, and sometimes it grows back with the fungus. Home Remedies There are people who swear by applying Vicks VapoRub, oregano oil, or tea tree oil to the toenail daily, says Sunding. However, these home remedies have never been proven by research to be successful at removing a fungal infection, she adds. Lasers There are laser treatments for toenail fungus, but they can be very expensive and insurance doesn’t cover them, says Sundling. More research is needed to know whether lasers can provide safe and effective treatment for most people, according to the American Academy of Dermatology, but the FDA has approved several laser devices for the treatment of toenail fungus. Ignoring It You don’t have to treat toenail fungus, as it’s mostly a cosmetic issue, says Sundling (though in some cases it can be painful). Some people put toenail polish on the affected nail and forget about it, she notes.

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How many days does it take to get rid of toenail fungus?

Usually three months of treatment cures a toenail fungal infection. Antifungal pills, however, can cause side effects.

What does really bad toenail fungus look like?

1. Nail color changes – If your nail turns white and chalky or yellow, it’s not a good sign. If it turns brown or green, it’s a very bad sign. It means the fungus has really gotten out of control, and your toe is infected.

Does sunlight help toenail fungus?

posted: Mar.09, 2017. Don’t let your unsightly toe nail fungus keep you from wearing your favorite sandals! Many people don’t even notice they have a fungal infection in their toenail and subsequently do not seek treatment. A group of fungi can easily attack the nail and live off the nail’s protein. · Sun Tan Toes ~ Soak up the sun not the fungus. Fungus thrives in moist and dark places so give it some light. Keep them naturally dry by exposing them to the sun whenever you can. · Soak without Soap ~ Cider vinegar isn’t just for salad anymore. Add the cider to warm water and soak for at least 10 minutes.

  • You can mix it up (and I’m not talking about salad) by using a blow dryer to get every nook and cranny dry when you’re done.
  • · Garlic Toes? ~ Yes, garlic is a great topical treatment.
  • Crush fresh garlic and apply it to the fungal infected area.
  • It has antimicrobial properties that will kill the infection.

Not recommended on date night. · Dry Little Piggies ~ Keeping your feet dry all the time is important so the bacteria can’t grow. Dry your toes thoroughly with a towel after a shower or a swim, change socks if you have been sweating in your sneakers or even if you had a little fun in the rain.

· Barefoot is Beautiful ~ Naked feet means light and airy instead of dark and gloomy. Take them for a good walk on the beach and let your toes enjoy the sand. But keep your shoes close by in case you need to walk in public areas. · Safe Socks ~ Let your feet breathe in cotton socks. Suffocation will not snuff fungus out but instead force it to grow and live longer.

Use cotton and remember to change them when they get wet from sweat and do not reuse them, ever. Prevention is always better than having to find a cure after the fact but if you missed the boat call Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC and make an appointment with Dr.

What kills toenail fungus permanently?

You may be able to treat toenail fungus at home with certain essential oils and other products with antimicrobial and antifungal properties, like Vicks VapoRub. Toenail fungus, also called onychomycosis, is a common fungal infection of the toenail. The most noticeable symptom is a white, brown, or yellow discoloration of one or more of the toenails.

It may spread and cause the nails to thicken or crack. Sandal season or not, toenail fungus typically isn’t what you want to see when you look at your feet. There are many treatments you can try, and some of them can be natural. Prescription oral antifungals, such as terbinafine (Lamisil) or fluconazole (Diflucan), are traditionally used to treat toenail fungus.

These treatments are often effective but may cause serious side effects such as upset stomach, dizziness, severe skin problems, and jaundice. This may be why many people try home remedies instead. Here are 10 of these at-home treatments.

Can I wear nail polish while treating nail fungus?

Which Nail Polish Can You Use If You Have Fungal Toenails? – Medications-Free Nail Polish Regular nail paint may look beautiful when used to hide diseased toenails, but doing so might exacerbate infections. It is wet and dark where fungus thrives. Fungus can flourish in environments created by nail polish.

Antifungal nail polish can be covered with non-medicated nail polish. But, it’s recommended to completely avoid non-medicated nail paint if you want your fungal infection to go away. Antifungal treatment will permeate the nails more slowly if non-medicated nail polish is used. If you want to use non-medicated nail polish, give your toenails a chance to breathe and take the polish off as soon as you can.

Application of Antifungal Nail Polish To be successful, medicated nail paint can be used everyday or a few times each week. Before reapplying, remove the previous coat of antifungal nail lacquer with an alcohol swab. Wash your feet with warm water or take a warm shower.

Does filing down a fungal nail help?

Living with a nail fungal infection – If you have a nail fungal infection, some things can help:

Keep your nails cut short and file down any thick areas. Don’t use the same nail trimmer and file on healthy nails and infected nails. If you have your nails professionally manicured, bring your own nail file and trimmer from home. Wear waterproof gloves for wet work (such as washing dishes or floors). Wear 100% cotton gloves for dry work. Wear socks made of wicking material (high-tech polyester). This pulls moisture away from the skin. Change your socks when they are damp from sweat or if your feet get wet. Put on clean, dry socks every day. Put over-the-counter antifungal foot powder inside your socks to keep your feet dry. Wear shoes with good support and a wide toe area. Don’t wear pointed shoes that press your toes together. Avoid walking barefoot in public areas, such as locker rooms.

Why is nail fungus so hard to cure?

Dear Doctor: I’ve tried all the toenail fungus cures in our drug store, and so far nothing works. Why not? What can I do? I really miss wearing sandals. Dear Reader: You are one of the estimated 6 million people in the United States struggling with toenail fungus.

It’s not only common, but, as you’ve learned, it’s a challenge as well. That’s because, although the symptoms affect the visible part of the toenail, the fungi causing the infection actually live underneath the toenail. Toenail fungus is usually caused by one of a group of microscopic organisms called dermatophytes.

Like the yeasts and molds they’re related to, these fungi absorb nutrients from organic substances. In the case of toenail fungus, the food source is the portion of the toenail known as the matrix. It’s found at the base of the nail, beneath the cuticle.

  1. The matrix is served by a network of nerves and blood vessels, and it generates the cells that become the new growth of the toenail.
  2. Although this type of fungal infection can affect the fingernails as well, it’s more common in the toenails due to the warm, moist and dark environment provided by socks and shoes.

A fungal infection in the toenails typically begins with discoloration, often in a brown or yellowish hue. As the nail grows, it may become thick, malformed and crumbly. The infection is hard to treat due to the makeup of the nail, which is a tough, close-knit protein known as keratin.

Some of the topical creams and liquids available at your local drug store can make the nail look better. However, keratin isn’t porous, so even medications that advertise themselves as antifungal can’t reach the infection. Even as your nails protect your tender toes, they shield the infection. The success rate of these types of medications is quite low.

Many people have good results with systemic medications, which are available by prescription. You take a pill, your digestive system releases the medication and your circulatory system delivers it to that network of blood vessels in the nail matrix that we discussed earlier.

  • These types of meds can have side effects, which range from headache and stomachache to liver damage.
  • When taking a systemic antifungal, it’s important to monitor liver function via regular blood tests.
  • Nail growth is slow, which means treatment is a lengthy process.
  • Oral treatment for toenail fungus typically takes three or four months, but it can take a year or more for toenails to look normal again.
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Newer treatments for toenail fungus include a prescription topical liquid and laser treatment. Each of these approaches have had mixed results. We’ve discussed toenail fungus here before, and we have heard from many readers about their own preferred home remedies.

  • These include daubing the affected nails with Vicks VapoRub and with tea tree oil.
  • Clinical trials have shown that these novel treatments, while not a complete cure, may have a positive effect.
  • We recommend that you check with your family doctor about which treatment would be best for you.
  • Send your questions to, or write: Ask the Doctors, c/o UCLA Health Sciences Media Relations, 10880 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1450, Los Angeles, CA, 90024.

Owing to the volume of mail, personal replies cannot be provided.)

What happens if you have toenail fungus for years?

Infection & Other Conditions – If toenail fungus is left untreated, it can spread to the surrounding skin on the foot, causing another condition known as athlete’s foot. An athlete’s foot is a condition resulting in itchy, red, and cracked skin, which can become very uncomfortable.

In some cases, toenail fungus can even spread to the genitals to cause jock itch. In severe cases, the spread of bacteria from untreated toenail fungus can cause cellulitis. Cellulitis is a condition in which your skin becomes swollen, red, and painful to the touch due to a bacterial infection. If cellulitis is left untreated, the infection can spread to the bloodstream and become a life-threatening condition for many individuals.

This is the most serious result of an untreated toenail fungus, which can be avoided with treatment from a medical professional.

What not to do with toe fungus?

Don’t go barefoot in public places. Use a spray or powder that fights fungus on your feet and in your shoes. Don’t pick at the skin around your nails. Don’t use nail polish or fake nails on your nails.

Will my fungus toenail grow back if I pull it off?

What To Expect – Fingernails may take 6 months to grow back. Toenails may take 12 to 18 months to grow back. The area exposed by the nail removal should be kept clean. You may cover the area with a thin layer of petroleum jelly, such as Vaseline, and a nonstick bandage.

Should I wear socks if I have toenail fungus?

Diagnosing toenail fungus – A number of conditions can masquerade as fungal infections. Age alone thickens and yellows the nail. can cause the nail and the surrounding skin to flake. Injuries can create bruising under the nail. Even the chemicals in nail polish can discolor the nail.

Whether you’re trying to clear up a fungal infection or hoping to avoid getting one, the following can help.

Wear socks that wick away perspiration. Although it seems counterintuitive, acrylic is much better at carrying off moisture than cotton. Use antifungal foot powder daily. Avoid shoes that keep your from breathing or that press on your nail. Wear sandals or flip-flops in shower rooms at gyms or pools to avoid infection.

What kills foot fungus naturally?

5. Baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) – Share on Pinterest Baking soda may have antifungal properties and could be used in a foot soak. Baking soda is an item most people have readily available. It may also be an effective way to cure athlete’s foot. A study in Mycopathologia found that sodium bicarbonate, also known as baking soda, does have antifungal abilities when used on the skin.

  • To make a foot soak, mix about a half cup of baking soda in a large bucket or basin of warm water.
  • Soak feet for 15 to 20 minutes, twice a day.
  • When done, dry the feet thoroughly but do not rinse.
  • If home remedies do not work or the problem has been going on for more than 2 weeks, a doctor or podiatrist may need to help.

A doctor may prescribe antifungal creams or medicines if the infection does not respond to at-home treatments. It is important for people to treat a persistent case of athlete’s foot because the fungus can spread to the nails, other body parts, and other people.

shoes and socks create a warm, moist environment that fungi need to thrivefeet are exposed to fungus and germs on the ground when walking around, especially if walking barefootthe area between the toes tends to be especially damp and warm

The term “athlete’s foot” comes from the belief that many athletic locker rooms and athletic equipment are hot, moist environments where the fungi can spread. Anyone can get athlete’s foot, however, regardless of their activity level. There are ways to protect the feet from fungi and avoid getting athlete’s foot.

Keep nails clipped short. Nails can more readily pick up bacteria and fungi if they are long.Never walk barefoot in public places. Wear sandals or waterproof shoes in public pools, showers, locker rooms, bathrooms, and other areas that get wet.Wash feet at least once a day and dry thoroughly.If a family member has athlete’s foot, disinfect the bathtub or shower after each use until it is gone.Do not share towels, shoes, socks, or other items that touch the feet.Alternate shoes daily to give each pair time to dry completely.Wear lightweight shoes and change socks frequently to keep feet dry. Avoid warm, heavy footwear if possible.

Those with certain health conditions, such as diabetes, should skip the home remedies and call a doctor right away if they notice problems with their feet. Even minor cracks and wounds on the feet can quickly become infected in some people with diabetes.

Athlete’s foot can certainly put a damper on plans to go barefoot at the beach. Fortunately, this common problem can usually be cured without complications. If home remedies do not work, drugstore antifungal creams may be an option. If the problem spreads, get worse, or does not respond to these home remedies, people should seek the advice of a doctor or podiatrist.

Prescription products are usually very effective when used as prescribed. If you want to buy any of the home remedies listed in this article, then they are available online.

Shop for tea tree oil Shop for hydrogen peroxide Shop for iodine solution Shop for talcum powder Shop for baking soda

Read this article in Spanish.

Can you cure toenail fungus in 2 weeks?

Medications – Your health care provider may prescribe antifungal drugs that you take by mouth (orally) or apply to the nail.

Oral antifungal drugs. These drugs are often the first choice. One option is itraconazole (Sporanox). These drugs help a new nail grow free of infection, slowly replacing the infected part. You typically take this type of drug daily for 6 to 12 weeks. But you won’t see the end result of treatment until the nail grows back completely. It may take four months or longer to eliminate an infection. Treatment success rates with these drugs appear to be lower in adults over age 65. Oral antifungal drugs may cause side effects such as rash and liver damage. Or they may interfere with other prescription drugs. You may need occasional blood tests to check on how you’re doing with these types of drugs. Health care providers may not recommend oral antifungal drugs for people with liver disease or congestive heart failure or those taking certain medications. Medicated nail polish. Your health care provider may prescribe an antifungal nail polish called ciclopirox (Penlac). You paint it on your infected nails and surrounding skin once a day. After seven days, you wipe the piled-on layers clean with alcohol and begin fresh applications. You may need to use this type of nail polish daily for almost a year. Medicated nail cream. Your health care provider may prescribe an antifungal cream, such as efinaconazole (Jublia) and tavaborole (Kerydin). You rub this product into your infected nails after soaking. These creams may work better if you first thin the nails. This helps the medication get through the hard nail surface to the underlying fungus. To thin nails, you apply a nonprescription lotion containing urea. Or your health care provider may thin the surface of the nail (debride) with a file or other tool. Antifungal nail creams may cause side effects such as rash.

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What are the stages of toenail fungus?

Overview – Nail fungus is a common infection of the nail. It begins as a white or yellow-brown spot under the tip of your fingernail or toenail. As the fungal infection goes deeper, the nail may discolor, thicken and crumble at the edge. Nail fungus can affect several nails.

If your condition is mild and not bothering you, you may not need treatment. If your nail fungus is painful and has caused thickened nails, self-care steps and medications may help. But even if treatment is successful, nail fungus often comes back. Nail fungus is also called onychomycosis (on-ih-koh-my-KOH-sis).

When fungus infects the areas between your toes and the skin of your feet, it’s called athlete’s foot (tinea pedis).

What color is toenail fungus when it dies?

Simply put, nobody wants to develop a case of toenail fungus. This is because toenail fungus can negatively impact the color, texture, and odor of the toenails. When a patient has a case of toenail fungus, they often want to know what signs they should be looking for that might indicate that the toenail fungus is dying.

It is important to remember that just because these signs might be present, this does not mean that a patient should immediately discontinue using any medication that their medical professional provided them. Some of these signs include a decline in the discoloration of the toenail. The toenail might slowly start getting less and less yellow, white, black, or brown.

Additionally, another important sign to look for is the diminishing thickness of the toenail. Lastly, a sign that a case of toenail fungus is dying is that a new nail is growing in a healthy state. Contact a podiatrist today if you want to treat your toenail fungus.

  • For more information about treatment, contact one of the podiatrists of JE Foot & Ankle Associates,
  • Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.
  • Toenail Fungus Treatment Toenail fungus is a condition that affects many people and can be especially hard to get rid of.

Fortunately, there are several methods to go about treating and avoiding it. Antifungals & Deterrence Oral antifungal medicine has been shown to be effective in many cases. It is important to consult with a podiatrist to determine the proper regiment for you, or potentially explore other options.

Applying foot powder on the feet and shoes helps keep the feet free of moisture and sweat. Sandals or open toed shoes – Wearing these will allow air movement and help keep feet dry. They also expose your feet to light, which fungus cannot tolerate. Socks with moisture wicking material also help as well.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fleming Island and Palm Coast, FL, We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Is toenail fungus a big deal?

Symptoms – Most fungal nail infections are not serious. However, some people may experience pain or be bothered by the appearance of their nails. Fungal nail infections may cause nails to become discolored, thick, fragile, or cracked. The nail may also become separated from the nail bed.

What makes toenail fungus worse?

Can I wear nail polish if I have toenail fungus? – You may feel tempted to cover up a discolored toenail with nail polish, But if you’re using a topical antifungal, you probably shouldn’t use polish. Your healthcare provider may tell you not to wear it in any case.

Does sunlight help toenail fungus?

posted: Mar.09, 2017. Don’t let your unsightly toe nail fungus keep you from wearing your favorite sandals! Many people don’t even notice they have a fungal infection in their toenail and subsequently do not seek treatment. A group of fungi can easily attack the nail and live off the nail’s protein. · Sun Tan Toes ~ Soak up the sun not the fungus. Fungus thrives in moist and dark places so give it some light. Keep them naturally dry by exposing them to the sun whenever you can. · Soak without Soap ~ Cider vinegar isn’t just for salad anymore. Add the cider to warm water and soak for at least 10 minutes.

  1. You can mix it up (and I’m not talking about salad) by using a blow dryer to get every nook and cranny dry when you’re done.
  2. · Garlic Toes? ~ Yes, garlic is a great topical treatment.
  3. Crush fresh garlic and apply it to the fungal infected area.
  4. It has antimicrobial properties that will kill the infection.

Not recommended on date night. · Dry Little Piggies ~ Keeping your feet dry all the time is important so the bacteria can’t grow. Dry your toes thoroughly with a towel after a shower or a swim, change socks if you have been sweating in your sneakers or even if you had a little fun in the rain.

· Barefoot is Beautiful ~ Naked feet means light and airy instead of dark and gloomy. Take them for a good walk on the beach and let your toes enjoy the sand. But keep your shoes close by in case you need to walk in public areas. · Safe Socks ~ Let your feet breathe in cotton socks. Suffocation will not snuff fungus out but instead force it to grow and live longer.

Use cotton and remember to change them when they get wet from sweat and do not reuse them, ever. Prevention is always better than having to find a cure after the fact but if you missed the boat call Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC and make an appointment with Dr.

What to do after toenail falls off from fungus?

If all or part of your toenail falls off, following certain safety procedures may help prevent additional injury or infection. Depending on the cause and severity, a doctor may recommend other treatments. A detached toenail is a common condition, but it can be painful.

  1. It’s usually caused by an injury, fungal infection, or psoriasis.
  2. However, chemicals, certain medications, and serious illness can also make your toenail fall off.
  3. Once your toenail falls off, it can’t reattach itself and keep growing.
  4. You’ll need to wait for the new nail to grow back in its place.
  5. Depending on the cause and how much, if any, of your toenail remains, you might need additional treatment to make sure your toenail grows back properly.

Regardless of what caused your toenail to fall off, there’s a few things you can do right after it happens to avoid any other problems. Here are some quick tips:

If only part of your toenail has fallen off, don’t try to remove the rest of it. If the detached part of your toenail is still attached to your toe, use nail clippers to carefully trim it off to prevent it from catching on your sock or clothing. Your doctor can help you do this if you’re not comfortable doing it on your own.Use a nail file to smooth any jagged or sharp edges. Clean your toe, making sure you remove any debris, and apply an antibiotic ointment,Cover the area where your toenail fell off with a bandage.Seek immediate treatment if your entire toenail falls off or the area around your toenail won’t stop bleeding.

Can toenail reattach after fungus?

Can onycholysis be cured? – There isn’t a cure for the section of your nail that’s detached from the nail bed — you can’t reattach it. But treatment can keep new nail growth attached to your nail bed.

How does toenail fungus progress?

Diagnosing toenail fungus – A number of conditions can masquerade as fungal infections. Age alone thickens and yellows the nail. can cause the nail and the surrounding skin to flake. Injuries can create bruising under the nail. Even the chemicals in nail polish can discolor the nail.

Whether you’re trying to clear up a fungal infection or hoping to avoid getting one, the following can help.

Wear socks that wick away perspiration. Although it seems counterintuitive, acrylic is much better at carrying off moisture than cotton. Use antifungal foot powder daily. Avoid shoes that keep your from breathing or that press on your nail. Wear sandals or flip-flops in shower rooms at gyms or pools to avoid infection.