How Much Ethanol Is In 87 Octane Gas
June 28, 2022 / 12:13 PM / CBS Pittsburgh CBS News Live CBS News Pittsburgh Live PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – If you haven’t heard, a local gas station, Sheetz, is running a holiday sale on gas through the Fourth of July, Prices for their 88 octane gas, known as UNL88, will be set at $3.99 a gallon through July 4th and their e85 gas will also be at a lowered price. Yet, not every car will be able to run on the new gas. Here are a couple of things you should know before making the change. Not every car can run either e85 and what Sheetz calls their 88-octane blend. More than likely your vehicle can run on at least one, the 88-octane blend. Far fewer cars can run on e85. Officially, the federal government has required car makers to come equipped with engine parts that can automatically adjust a vehicle to run 88-octane without a single action by the driver. Only a select group of cars can use e85. While the federal government says it is acceptable to use the 88-octane blend, using the fuel in your vehicle could void the manufacturer’s warranty. The 88-octane is just a fancy way of saying e15 gas. This is a blend of gasoline that blends gas with 15 percent ethanol.87-octane can have no more than 10 percent ethanol. The difference between 87 and 88 is an additional 5% ethanol. This is important because if you have an owner’s manual from a vehicle made in 2002-2015, it probably lists the maximum amount of ethanol at up to 10 percent. Most manuals from cars made in 2016 or later probably list the maximum amount of ethanol as up to 15 percent. e85 vehicles have ethanol amounts of up to 85 percent. Vehicles should mention being able to run e85 gas around the gas cap.88-octane gas is better for the environment and costs less than 87-octane. While there is some debate out there on the positives with ’88’ it technically burns cooler than 87 when cars are equipped with the latest technology. It also can provide more power as the higher the octane the more pressure the gas causes when ignited. Pressure can be transformed into horsepower by engines but for most cars, there is little to no change in power. NASCAR runs exclusively on e15 gas and INDY cars use e85. There are a couple of potential negatives to running 88-octane. There should be a loss in MPG when it comes to 88-octane of less than 5 percent. When you factor in the normal cost of 88-octane, you normally come out ahead when it comes to cents per mile driven. Vehicles that are not listed as being able to run 88-octane could see long-term engine damage including a higher likelihood of seeing fluids leaking. Engines not equipped with newer equipment to handle 88-octane could potentially overheat. With the big sale this weekend, that difference may be hard to ignore for some. Mechanics say that any issues with using 88-octane will come from long-term usage and this weekend looks to be the perfect time to try out a new grade of gas that could help your pocketbook.88-octane is not recommended for engines that remain full for long periods of time with generally a month as the cut-off. This means things like lawnmowers and other power tools that have combustible engines should probably stick to 87.

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Is there ethanol in 87 octane?

Fuel Properties – Ethanol (CH 3 CH 2 OH) is a clear, colorless liquid. It is also known as ethyl alcohol, grain alcohol, and EtOH (see Fuel Properties search,) Ethanol has the same chemical formula regardless of whether it is produced from starch- or sugar-based feedstocks, such as corn grain (as it primarily is in the United States), sugar cane (as it primarily is in Brazil), or from cellulosic feedstocks (such as wood chips or crop residues).

Ethanol has a higher octane number than gasoline, providing premium blending properties. Minimum octane number requirements for gasoline prevent engine knocking and ensure drivability. Lower-octane gasoline is blended with 10% ethanol to attain the standard 87 octane. Ethanol contains less energy per gallon than gasoline, to varying degrees, depending on the volume percentage of ethanol in the blend.

Denatured ethanol (98% ethanol) contains about 30% less energy than gasoline per gallon. Ethanol’s impact on fuel economy is dependent on the ethanol content in the fuel and whether an engine is optimized to run on gasoline or ethanol.

Does 93 octane have more ethanol than 87?

Does higher octane gas have less ethanol? – Don’t be misled into thinking higher octane gas contains less ethanol. In fact, it has more! The octane rating of pure ethanol is 100, but when it’s blended with gasoline, it performs as if it’s 112. In other words, higher-octane blends — Petro Canada’s 94 and Esso’s 93 — use more ethanol, not less.

How much ethanol is in 89 octane gas?

Regular gasoline – 87 octane; contains 10% ethanol, known as E10. Mid-grade gasoline – 89 octane; contains 5% ethanol, known as E5. Premium gasoline – 91 octane; will not contain ethanol.

How much alcohol is in 87?

What is Unleaded 88? – Unleaded 88 is a blend of 84 octane gasoline and ethanol. The difference is Unleaded 87 has 10% ethanol and Unleaded 88 has 15% ethanol. The 5% increase in ethanol increases the octane rating to 88.

Does 87 octane have 10 ethanol?

June 28, 2022 / 12:13 PM / CBS Pittsburgh CBS News Live CBS News Pittsburgh Live PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – If you haven’t heard, a local gas station, Sheetz, is running a holiday sale on gas through the Fourth of July, Prices for their 88 octane gas, known as UNL88, will be set at $3.99 a gallon through July 4th and their e85 gas will also be at a lowered price. Yet, not every car will be able to run on the new gas. Here are a couple of things you should know before making the change. Not every car can run either e85 and what Sheetz calls their 88-octane blend. More than likely your vehicle can run on at least one, the 88-octane blend. Far fewer cars can run on e85. Officially, the federal government has required car makers to come equipped with engine parts that can automatically adjust a vehicle to run 88-octane without a single action by the driver. Only a select group of cars can use e85. While the federal government says it is acceptable to use the 88-octane blend, using the fuel in your vehicle could void the manufacturer’s warranty. The 88-octane is just a fancy way of saying e15 gas. This is a blend of gasoline that blends gas with 15 percent ethanol.87-octane can have no more than 10 percent ethanol. The difference between 87 and 88 is an additional 5% ethanol. This is important because if you have an owner’s manual from a vehicle made in 2002-2015, it probably lists the maximum amount of ethanol at up to 10 percent. Most manuals from cars made in 2016 or later probably list the maximum amount of ethanol as up to 15 percent. e85 vehicles have ethanol amounts of up to 85 percent. Vehicles should mention being able to run e85 gas around the gas cap.88-octane gas is better for the environment and costs less than 87-octane. While there is some debate out there on the positives with ’88’ it technically burns cooler than 87 when cars are equipped with the latest technology. It also can provide more power as the higher the octane the more pressure the gas causes when ignited. Pressure can be transformed into horsepower by engines but for most cars, there is little to no change in power. NASCAR runs exclusively on e15 gas and INDY cars use e85. There are a couple of potential negatives to running 88-octane. There should be a loss in MPG when it comes to 88-octane of less than 5 percent. When you factor in the normal cost of 88-octane, you normally come out ahead when it comes to cents per mile driven. Vehicles that are not listed as being able to run 88-octane could see long-term engine damage including a higher likelihood of seeing fluids leaking. Engines not equipped with newer equipment to handle 88-octane could potentially overheat. With the big sale this weekend, that difference may be hard to ignore for some. Mechanics say that any issues with using 88-octane will come from long-term usage and this weekend looks to be the perfect time to try out a new grade of gas that could help your pocketbook.88-octane is not recommended for engines that remain full for long periods of time with generally a month as the cut-off. This means things like lawnmowers and other power tools that have combustible engines should probably stick to 87.

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In: Links & Numbers Gas Prices

Ron Smiley Arriving to KDKA in June 2015, Ron Smiley has been giving a local and hopefully bright outlook on the day in Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania. Thanks for reading CBS NEWS. Create your free account or log in for more features. Please enter email address to continue Please enter valid email address to continue

What octane is 50 ethanol?

Ask Away! with Jeff Smith: Some Calculations & Guidelines for Blending Fuel Octanes, Posted 02/16/22 by Last updated on 02/03/2023 I came across your article on blending E85 with pump gasoline and I have a question. I have a C7 ZR1 that is un-tuned that needs 96 octane to prevent timing from being pulled.

  • *** Mix #1 E10 93 ***
  • 2 gal E85 + 16 gal E10 932 x 105= 21016 x 93= 1488
  • 1698/18= 94.3 Octane
  1. 2 x 85= 17016 x10= 160
  2. 330/18= 18.3% E
  3. *** Mix #2 No E 93 ***

3.75 gal E85 + 14.25 gal no E 933.75 x 105= 393.7514.25 x 93= 1325.25 1719/18= 95.5 Octane 3.75 x 85= 318.7514.25 x 0=0 318.75/18= 17.7% E B.H. The story that B.H. refers to is an article I wrote for the EngineLabs website on mixing E85 with regular pump gas.

  • The car that this reader is using is a with a ZR1 package, which is a supercharged 6.2L LT direct injection engine that Chevrolet rates at 755 hp.
  • It’s also helpful to know that GM rated this engine using 93 octane fuel, a pump gasoline that is not prevalent across the country.
  • Before we get into the details, let’s cover some basics.

Gasoline in the U.S. is rated by combining the Research octane number (which is almost always higher) with the Motor octane number (which is lower) and averaging them—which is what you see on the gas pump as (R+M) / 2 = Anti-Knock Index (AKI). Interestingly, European fuels are rated by their Research octane numbers only, which is a critical distinction that our friends who drive Porches should keep in mind.

The important thing to know is that when blending gasoline of different octane numbers, the curve is linear. This means if you blend 10 percent 100 octane race gas with 90 percent 91 pump gas, it will increase the octane of the 91 to 91.9—it’s a simple proportion problem. Or, if you mix it 50/50, then you’ll get 95.5 octane.

Blending ethanol with pump gasoline operates much differently. Rather than a straight linear curve, the benefit of ethanol is that the first 10 to 30 percent blend of ethanol with a pump gasoline like 91 will radically increase the octane rating of the fuel.

So creating an E30 fuel by blending 91 octane pump gas with E85 would generate a fuel with an octane rating of 94 AKI. Once you get to blend ratios over 60 percent, the octane benefit from ethanol is still there but the rate of benefit slows down—almost like a plateau. Think of this effect as like the Law of Diminishing Returns.

To illustrate this point, standard 87 octane pump gasoline with 10 percent ethanol actually starts as 84 octane without the ethanol. The additional three octane numbers are gained by the relatively minor 10 percent added ethanol. This is why all the gasoline companies like ethanol—it’s an inexpensive way to increase octane.

  1. They just don’t want you to know how easy it is to mix ethanol with gasoline which will increase the octane rating of the fuel and also reduce the cost of the fuel at the same time, because E85 is generally less expensive than pump gasoline.
  2. It’s also important to note that one of the major advantages of ethanol is its cooling effect.

When alcohol blended fuels are introduced into the engine, the alcohol evaporates much more quickly at lower temperatures. And when this occurs, the alcohol pulls heat out of the air. An analogy would be when you go the doctor’s office and the nurse swabs your arm with alcohol.

  1. That spot feels cold because the alcohol evaporates and pulls heat off your arm.
  2. The same thing happens when running an alcohol blend fuel.
  3. The alcohol evaporates and reduces the inlet air temperature.
  4. This is important because for every 25 degrees reduction in inlet air temperature, the engine requires one less octane to be detonation resistant.

In other words, heating the inlet air also increases octane requirements. We all know that superchargers heat the inlet air when as it is compressed. So using a fuel with 30 to 50 percent ethanol will radically reduce the inlet air temperature. As an example, in a test we did years ago a supercharged small block running 9 psi of boost would generally generate around 150 degree F inlet air temperature after the supercharger on gasoline.

With E85 fuel, our experience is that the discharge temperature was closer to 90 degrees F—or a reduction of more than 60 degrees F. That will reduce the engine’s octane requirement by roughly 2 points. Now you begin to see why so many folks are converting to run on ethanol-blended fuel. To address your math as far as blending mixtures go, your numbers are close but our numbers indicate that a blend of pump gas and E85 to produce a splash blend mixture of E30 would be worth 3 octane points.

A blend ratio of E50 or 50 percent ethanol will deliver roughly 4.5 to perhaps 5 numbers. In other words, an E50 blend of E85 and pump 91 premium gasoline (that already has 10 percent ethanol in it) would produce a fuel with an AKI number of around 95 AKI.

  • Whether that overall AKI number is sufficient to allow your engine to not pull timing back is beyond our ability to predict—but in our humble opinion it would be very close to ideal.
  • One final caveat is that this blend ratio assumes the engine’s current are large enough to supply the additional fuel volume.

This is a real requirement because ethanol only produces about 75 percent of the heat of gasoline, so you have to run more fuel to make the same amount of heat. If the injectors are too small, the duty cycle on the injector approaches or hits 100 percent.

What percent ethanol is 95 octane?

We offer two gasoline grades differing mainly by their octane rating and ethanol concentration. – The first gasoline grade number (95 or 98) describes the product’s octane rating and the following number the maximum ethanol content (5 or 10%). The octane rating describes the compression resistance of the gasoline and affects its ignition timing in the engine.

  • Choice of the right gasoline product chiefly depends on the octane rating specified for the engine.
  • If the instruction manual requires use of fuel with higher octane rating than 95, the 98E5 grade petrol must be preferred.
  • Gasoline grades are produced separately for summer and winter conditions.
  • The volatility of winter grade, i.e.

the steam pressure is higher than the summer grade. Gasoline grades are mixed with renewable components of which the most widely used is ethanol.

How much ethanol is in 98 octane gas?

Premium Unleaded 98 | Budget Petrol A 98 octane rating premium fuel. Some vehicles pre-1986 may require an additive (check with your manufacturer). Our Premium 98 contains no Ethanol and is sourced for use in many imported and high performance vehicles which are designed to run exclusively on premium fuels with a minimum octane rating of 98.Premium 98 is designed to take you further, improve fuel economy by helping to prevent the buildup of engine deposits.

Although higher in price, Premium fuels are designed to increase your mileage. The fuel economy any particular motorist achieves is also highly dependent upon driving style, weather conditions and the type and condition of the vehicle. Our Premium Unleaded 98 is sourced from quality suppliers to conform to Australian automotive industry requirements and the Australian Fuel Quality Standards.

: Premium Unleaded 98 | Budget Petrol

What octane rating is 100 ethanol?

Ethanol’s Octane Advantage – One of ethanol’s most important benefits is also one of its best kept secrets: Octane. A fuel’s octane rating is the measure of its ability to resist “knocking.” 100% Ethanol has an octane rating of 113. That compares to an octane rating for regular unleaded gasoline of 87.

What octane is 15% ethanol?

Unleaded 88/E15 Frequently Asked Questions – What is Unleaded 88/E15? E15 is a blend of 15% ethanol and 85% gasoline. It contains 5% more ethanol than E10, which is the most common fuel used in the U.S. E15 is higher in octane – typically 88 octane while E10 has an octane rating of 87.

Retailers are offering E15 as Unleaded 88 to highlight its high octane value. Can I use Unleaded 88 in my vehicle? Unleaded 88 can be used in all 2001 & newer cars, trucks and SUVs. These model years represent more than 90% of vehicles on the road today. It’s the most tested fuel in history and has no effect on vehicle drivability.

To date, more than 20 BILLION miles have been driven using Unleaded 88, and that number continues to grow. What type of mileage will I get when using Unleaded 88? There is no noticeable difference between the mileage achieved when using Unleaded 88 and the mileage when operating on E10.

What is the price of Unleaded 88? Unleaded 88 is the lowest-cost fuel available for 2001 & newer vehicles, typically selling for 5 – 10 cents a gallon less than E10. The price difference between Unleaded 88 and conventional gasoline without ethanol is around 40 cents. Can I use Unleaded 88/E15 in my lawnmower or other small engine equipment? Unleaded 88 has not been approved by EPA for use in non-automotive engines like boats, motorcycles, lawn mowers and other small or off-road engines because it wasn’t tested.

E10, however, is approved for every on-road and off-road engine.

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What gas is max 10% ethanol?

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that in 2021, the 134.55 billion gallons of finished motor gasoline consumed in the United States contained about 13.92 billion gallons of fuel ethanol, equal to about 10% of the total volume of finished motor gasoline consumption.

  • Fuel ethanol contains a denaturant that is added to ethanol to make fuel ethanol unfit for human consumption.
  • Federal law requires that fuel ethanol contain at least 2% denaturant by volume, but the actual amount in fuel ethanol may be higher.
  • Most of the gasoline now sold in the United States contains some ethanol.

Most of ethanol blending into U.S. motor gasoline occurs to meet the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act (RFG Fuel) and the Renewable Fuel Standard set forth in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers the requirements with the Renewable Fuel Standard Program,

There are three general categories of ethanol-gasoline blends: E10, E15, and E85. E10 is gasoline with 10% ethanol content. E15 is gasoline with 15% ethanol content, and E85 is a fuel that may contain up to 85% fuel ethanol. The ethanol content of most of the motor gasoline sold in the United States does not exceed 10% by volume.

Most motor gasoline with more than 10% fuel ethanol content is sold in the Midwest where most ethanol production capacity is located. Gasoline dispensing pumps generally indicate the fuel ethanol content of the gasoline. All gasoline engine vehicles can use E10.

  1. Currently, only flex-fuel and light-duty vehicles with a model year of 2001 or newer are approved by the EPA to use E15,
  2. Flex-fuel vehicles can use any ethanol-gasoline blends up to E85.
  3. The energy content of ethanol is about 33% less than pure gasoline.
  4. The impact of fuel ethanol on vehicle fuel economy varies depending on the amount of denaturant that is added to the ethanol.

The energy content of denaturant is about equal to the energy content of pure gasoline. In general, vehicle fuel economy may decrease by about 3% when using E10 relative to gasoline that does not contain fuel ethanol. Learn more: Biofuels Explained: Ethanol Fuel ethanol overview (Table 10.3),

How much octane does 10% ethanol add?

What is the octane level of ethanol? – Pure ethanol carries an octane rating of 113, so adding 10 percent ethanol to unleaded gasoline will raise the fuel’s octane rating between 2 and 3 points.

Can you drink 95% ethanol?

What is ethanol and the different grades available What is ethanol and the different grades available Besides our favorite drinks stocked in our bar, alcohol is also a main component in a lot of everyday products we are using : window cleaner, hand sanitizer to perfumes.

Ethanol for non beverage beverage and industrial uses is a very large subject. it is hard to organise in distinct categories, which can be hard when you are looking to buy ethanol. In order to help you, we will explore the different grades of ethanol and what they are used for. Ethanol, also known as ethyl alcohol, pure alcohol, grain alcohol, or drinking alcohol, is often abbreviated as EtOH.

EtOH is a light alcohol and is a volatile, colourless, flammable liquid with a characteristic odour. EtOH burns with an almost invisible flame and is biodegradable. Without proper conditions, EtOH attracts water while stored. Another important feature of EtOH is the formation of an azeotropic mixture with water.

PRODUCTION PROCESS EtOH is a naturally widespread chemical, produced by ripe fruits and by wild yeasts or bacteria through fermentation. Ethanol from biomass can be produced from any feedstock containing appreciable amounts of sugar or materials that can be converted into sugar. Fermentation (biotechnology) is the predominate pathway for EtOH production.

Biomass can also be converted to EtOH via biotechnological and thermochemical pathways. BIOCHEMICAL PATHWAYS The most common raw materials are sugar cane and corn, and in temperate climates also sugar beet, wheat or potatoes. The overall fermentation process starting from glucose is: Naturally, the underlying biochemical processes are much more complicated. Adapted yeasts, for example Saccharomyces cerevisiae are used and fermentation can be carried out with or without the presence of oxygen. With oxygen some yeasts are prone to respiration, the conversion of sugars to carbon dioxide and water.

  • As EtOH is a toxin, there is a limit to the maximum concentration in the brew produced by the yeasts.
  • This results in a high energy demand for EtOH purification by distillation.
  • In industrial processes an efficiency of about 90 to 95 % of theoretical yields can be reached.
  • But, unmodified yeast will only convert sugars with 6 carbon atoms.

As sugars with 6 carbon atoms are only a part of the biomass the overall conversion efficiency is much lower. To enable the use of a wider range of biomass components, processes that also convert sugars with 5 carbon atoms are under development. Larger compounds in biomass (cellulose and hemicellulose) must first be broken down into fermentable sugars and lignin, which is currently not a candidate feedstock for EtOH. Ethylene is obtained from petrochemical feedstocks. Phosphoric acid is mostly used as a catalyst. EtOH can also be produced from synthesis gas through chemical synthesis. In addition, certain microorganisms are able to digest synthesis gas to produce ethanol. Ethanol is a valuable ingredient in the production of :

Alcoholic beverages: Spirits and alcohols (e.g. vodka & gin). Neutral alcohol is mixed with water, aromas and flavourings to produce the final product. Food and non-alcoholic beverages: Flavours and aromas. Ethanol is used as a natural product to extract and concentrate flavours and aromas, which are then used by the food & drink industry. No alcohol is contained in the final products. Chemicals: Paints and thermometers. Ethanol is widely used as a solvent, and you can find it in many household products, such as the de-icer or anti-freeze you use to clear your car windscreen. Increasingly ethanol is used as a renewable alternative to fossil-based chemicals for creating a large range of products, such as bioplastics. Cosmetics: Ethanol is contained in perfumes, deodorants, and other cosmetics. Pharmaceutical: Ethanol also has many medical uses, and can be found in products such as medicines, medical wipes and as an antiseptic in most antibacterial hand sanitiser gels.

Ethanol grades 1) 95% (95.6%) ethanol This is the highest concentration of ethanol you can get by distillation, because 95.6% ethanol is an azeotrope, which means the vapor state has the same ethanol:water ratio as the liquid state.2) Absolute (99-100%) ethanol Some procedures that are sensitive to the presence of water require absolute ethanol.

  • A common method to produce ethanol with a higher concentration than 95% is to use additives that disrupt the azeotrope composition and allow further distillation.
  • For this reason, absolute ethanol sometimes contains trace amounts of these additives (such as benzene).
  • Absolute ethanol is hygroscopic (it attracts water), so don’t expect it to remain ‘100%’ ethanol for long if it’s left uncapped.3) Denatured ethanol Denatured ethanol (either 95% or absolute) contains additives (such as methanol and isopropanol) that render it unsafe to drink, and therefore exempt from certain beverage taxes.

This makes it cheaper than pure ethanol. If you like further clarification or advice on which ethanol type is best suited for your purpose – contact us today : What is ethanol and the different grades available

Does all gas have 10% ethanol?

E10 – E10 is a low-level blend composed of 10% ethanol and 90% gasoline. It is approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in any conventional, gasoline-powered vehicle. The use of E10 was spurred by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (and subsequent laws), which mandated the sale of oxygenated fuels in areas with unhealthy levels of carbon monoxide.

What alcohol is 95% ethanol?

30 ml bottle of 95% ethyl alcohol, also known as denatured ethanol or grain alcohol. This nearly pure ethanol solution is a denaturant and has many uses, some of which are listed below.

How much ethanol is in E85 gas?

E85 (or flex fuel) is a term that refers to high-level ethanol-gasoline blends containing 51% to 83% ethanol, depending on geography and season (see Fuel Properties and E85 Flex Fuel Specification ). Visit Fueleconomy.gov to learn how to identify a flex-fuel vehicle (FFV) or use the Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Search to find current FFV models,

Does premium gas have less ethanol?

Is Premium or Mid-Grade Fuel Worth the Extra Money? – Premium gas doesn’t provide any more power or contain better additives than regular gas, and it contains the same amount of ethanol as other grades. It just resists detonation (knock) better than lower-octane gas—nothing more, nothing less.

  • Some brands place slightly more detergent additive in their premium than in their other grades, but all grades meet the minimum required by the EPA.
  • Bottom line? The carmaker knows best, so use the octane-rated fuel that’s called for in your owner’s manual.
  • If your engine requires or ‘recommends’ 89- or 93-octane fuel, that’s what you should use to get peak performance and fuel efficiency.

But there is an exception to the rule. If you have an older car that’s designed for 87-octane gas and it knocks when you punch the pedal, try filling it with 89-octane fuel to see if the knock goes away. If so, keep using 89-octane to regain some power and save your engine.2 / 10 Family Handyman

Which is better E85 or 87?

E85 has higher octane than regular gasoline. This means that E85 is a lot better for your car’s engine than regular gasoline. It is also a cleaner fuel with lesser harmful emissions. On the downside, E85 burns faster and produces lesser energy than gasoline.

What octane is jet fuel?

What is the octane rating of aviation fuel? – The octane ratings of AVGAS, a gasoline-based fuel, are usually either 91 or 100 (lean mixture) and 96 or 130 (rich mixture). The octane rating of jet fuel is much lower, around 15 – this is much more like automotive diesel and thus much more resistant to detonating due to sparks or compression.

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Is E10 gas the same as 87?

Description. E10 gasoline (87 octane) is a regular gasoline formulated at an octane rating of 87. It’s a preferred variety of gasoline for many automobiles.

How much ethanol is in 98?

Availability – E10 Logo required on Delaware fuel dispensers

  • E10 became the standard fuel at petrol stations in the United Kingdom as of September 2021. E5 is still an option for drivers who wish to fuel incompatible cars but is decreasing in availability.
  • E10 was introduced nationwide in Thailand in 2007, and replaced 91 octane pure gasoline in that country in 2013.
  • E10 is commonly available in the Midwestern United States, It was also mandated for use in all standard automobile fuel in the state of Florida by the end of 2010. Due to the phasing out of MTBE as a gasoline additive and mainly due to the mandates established in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, ethanol blends have increased throughout the United States, and by 2009, the ethanol market share in the U.S. gasoline supply reached almost 8% by volume.
  • Many petrol stations throughout Australia sell E10, typically at a few cents cheaper per litre than regular unleaded. It is more commonly found throughout the state of Queensland due to its large sugarcane farming regions. The use of E10 is also subsidised by the Queensland government. Many petrol stations are either slowly phasing out or already do not offer a “Regular 91” petrol option, instead only offering Regular E10 (91 or 94 depending on brand), Premium (95) and Premium (98), although regular unleaded still remains commonly available in Victoria and New South Wales.
  • In Sweden, all 95-octane gasoline is E10 (6 to 10 percent of ethanol) since 1 August 2021, when the proportion of ethanol was increased from E5. In the early-mid-1990s, some fuel chains also sold E10. All newer and many older petrol cars bought in Sweden should handle this, since from January 2011, the Fuel Quality Directive (Directive 2009/30/EC) applied through its transposition into the law of Sweden as a member of the 27 member states of the EU. Older petrol cars should be compatible with 98-octane fuel, which includes maximum 5 percent of ethanol, often much less. The product data sheets of the major fuel chains has not clearly stated ethanol content of their 98-octane gasoline, but it varies between places.
Reduction mandate of greenhouse emissions from fossil fuels in Sweden by means of biofuel mixtures

*) Reduced reduction to the EU minimum level is suggested by the Kristersson Cabinet, **)Further reduction was paused during 2023 based on a bill by the Andersson Cabinet,

Year Gasoline Diesel Jet kerosene
2020 4,2 % 21 %
2021 6,0 % (1 Aug) 26 % (1 Aug) 0,8 % (1 July)
2022 7,8 % 30,5 % 1,7 %
2023 10,1 % 7,8 %** 35 % 30,5 %** 2,6 %
2024 12,5 %* 40 %* 3,5 %
2025 15,5 %* 45 %* 4,5 %
2026 19 %* 50 %* 7,2 %
2027 22 %* 54 %* 10,8 %
2028 24 %* 58 %* 15,3 %
2029 26 %* 62 %* 20,7 %
2030 28 %* 66 %* 27,0 %

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  • From January 2011, all 95-octane fuel in Finland is E10, and 98E5 octane fuel is also available.
  • Mandatory blending of ethanol was approved in Mozambique, but the percentage in the blend has not been specified.
  • South Africa approved a biofuel strategy in 2007, and mandated an 8% blend of ethanol by 2013.
  • A 2007 Uruguayan law mandates a minimum of 5% of ethanol blended with gasoline starting in January 2015. The monopolic, state-owned fuel producer ANCAP started blending premium gasoline with 10% of bioethanol in December 2009, which will be available in all the country by early January 2010. The other two gasolines will follow later in 2010.
  • The Dominican Republic has a mandate for blending 15% of ethanol by 2015.
  • Chile is considering the introduction of E5, and Panama, Bolivia and Venezuela of E10.
  • India achieved the target of 10 percent ethanol blending, 5 months ahead of schedule, in June 2022.
  • From January 2018, all 92-octane fuel in Vietnam is mandated to contain 5 percent ethanol (E5). No ethanol blending is required for 95-octane fuel.
  • From June 2021, Argentina approved an E12 minimum (Law 27640), and after October 2022 a waiver for a maximum of E15.
  • Low ethanol blends used around the world (E5 to E25)
    Country Ethanol blend Legal use Country Ethanol blend Legal use Country Ethanol blend Legal use State Ethanol blend State Ethanol blend
    Countries with mandatory blends or available for optional use European Union United States (states where mandatory only)
    Argentina E12 Mandated Malawi E10 Mandated Austria E10 Optional Florida E10 Minnesota E10
    Australia E10 Optional Mexico E6 Mandated Denmark E5 Optional Hawaii E10 Missouri E10
    Brazil E18-E27.5 Mandated New Zealand E10 Optional Finland E5/E10 Mandated Iowa E10 Montana E10
    Canada E5 Mandated Pakistan E10 Optional France E5/E10 Optional Kansas E10 Oregon E10
    China E10 Nine provinces Paraguay E18/24 Mandated Germany E5/E10 Optional Louisiana E10 Washington E10
    Colombia E10 Mandated Peru E8 Mandated Ireland E4 Mandated California E10
    Costa Rica E7 Mandated Philippines E10 Mandated Netherlands E5/E10/hE15 Optional
    India E20 Mandated Thailand E10/E20 Mandated Romania E4 Mandated
    Jamaica E10 Mandated Vietnam E5 Optional Sweden E5/E10 Mandated
    See the country notes at the end of the article

    A 2011 study conducted by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland found practically no difference in fuel consumption in normal driving conditions between commercial gasoline grades 95E10 and 98E5 sold in Finland, despite the public perception that fuel consumption is significantly higher with 95E10.

    • VTT performed the comparison test under controlled laboratory conditions and their measurements showed the cars tested used an average of 10.30 liters (2.27 imp gal; 2.72 U.S.
    • Gal) of 95E10 per 100 km (62 mi), as opposed to 10.23 liters (2.25 imp gal; 2.70 U.S.
    • Gal) of 98E5 per 100 km (62 mi).
    • The difference was 0.07 in favor of 98E5 on average, meaning that using 95E10 gasoline, which has a higher ethanol content, increases consumption by 0.7%.

    When the measurements are normalized, the difference becomes 1.0%, a result that is highly consistent with an estimation of calorific values based on approximate fuel composition, which came out at 1.1% in favour of E5.

    What octane is ethanol?

    Ethanol as an Octane Booster – In addition to having lower lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions than conventional gasoline, ethanol is an excellent octane provider, with neat (pure) ethanol having an octane rating of over 100. Currently, refiners create ‘sub-octane gas,’ which has a lower octane rating than required.

    • _
    • The Search for Additional Octane
    • Currently, there are two ways of increasing the octane content of gasoline: increasing the volume of gasoline aromatics or increasing the volume of ethanol,
    • _

    Which octane has less ethanol?

    How Much Ethanol Is In 87, 89, 91 And 93 Octane Gasoline? – It is standard practice to include 10% and 5% ethanol in gasoline with an octane fuel value of 87 and 89, respectively. Ideally, 91-93 octane gas doesn’t include ethanol, but there is still 5-10% ethanol in reality.

    The amount of ethanol in E85 petrol, also known as flex fuel, can reach 85%. The amount of ethanol may, however, change according to the state in which you reside. For instance, various states have accepted the LCFS (shorts for Low Carbon Fuel Standard). This mandates that fuel manufacturers steadily reduce their regular diesel and gasoline carbon content.

    Thus, ethanol content in gas may rise to achieve these requirements.

    What grade of gasoline has ethanol?

    The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that in 2021, the 134.55 billion gallons of finished motor gasoline consumed in the United States contained about 13.92 billion gallons of fuel ethanol, equal to about 10% of the total volume of finished motor gasoline consumption.

    Fuel ethanol contains a denaturant that is added to ethanol to make fuel ethanol unfit for human consumption. Federal law requires that fuel ethanol contain at least 2% denaturant by volume, but the actual amount in fuel ethanol may be higher. Most of the gasoline now sold in the United States contains some ethanol.

    Most of ethanol blending into U.S. motor gasoline occurs to meet the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act (RFG Fuel) and the Renewable Fuel Standard set forth in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers the requirements with the Renewable Fuel Standard Program,

    There are three general categories of ethanol-gasoline blends: E10, E15, and E85. E10 is gasoline with 10% ethanol content. E15 is gasoline with 15% ethanol content, and E85 is a fuel that may contain up to 85% fuel ethanol. The ethanol content of most of the motor gasoline sold in the United States does not exceed 10% by volume.

    Most motor gasoline with more than 10% fuel ethanol content is sold in the Midwest where most ethanol production capacity is located. Gasoline dispensing pumps generally indicate the fuel ethanol content of the gasoline. All gasoline engine vehicles can use E10.

    • Currently, only flex-fuel and light-duty vehicles with a model year of 2001 or newer are approved by the EPA to use E15,
    • Flex-fuel vehicles can use any ethanol-gasoline blends up to E85.
    • The energy content of ethanol is about 33% less than pure gasoline.
    • The impact of fuel ethanol on vehicle fuel economy varies depending on the amount of denaturant that is added to the ethanol.

    The energy content of denaturant is about equal to the energy content of pure gasoline. In general, vehicle fuel economy may decrease by about 3% when using E10 relative to gasoline that does not contain fuel ethanol. Learn more: Biofuels Explained: Ethanol Fuel ethanol overview (Table 10.3),

    Is E10 gas the same as 87?

    Description. E10 gasoline (87 octane) is a regular gasoline formulated at an octane rating of 87. It’s a preferred variety of gasoline for many automobiles.