How Many Jobs Are Available In Natural Gas Distribution

How many people are employed in the natural gas industry?

There are 118,584 people employed in the Natural Gas Distribution industry in the US as of 2023.

How many people work in the US oil and gas industry?

What Can We Take from These Oil and Gas Industry Employment Statistics? – From these statistics, we could learn that employment in the petroleum industry in 2021 is both a chance and a challenge. The downturn induced by the pandemic is responsible for jeopardizing many companies in this field.

  1. The pandemic has slowed down the industry considerably and sped up the move towards healthier energy alternatives,
  2. However, the real money (and demand) is still very much there for fossil fuels and natural gas, so these industries aren’t going anywhere in a hurry.
  3. Furthermore, working in the oil and gas industry can give enormous benefits in terms of compensation.

Yet, the workers in this sector are exposed to a higher risk of fatalities if petroleum companies fail to provide them with proper safety measures.

What is natural gas distribution?

Natural gas is delivered from the transmission system to end-use customers by the distribution system. Unlike the transmission system, which carries large volumes of natural gas at high pressures, the distribution system winds through cities and other areas of gas demand at much lower pressures and through much smaller line pipe — typically from two to 24 inches in diameter.

  • Pressures typically range from 60 psi (nearer the transmission line) to 1 psi as it reaches a home or small business.
  • This pressure is important because the appliances used in your home or business are not designed to accommodate high gas pressure.
  • Thus, as a rule, the closer the pipe gets to the end user, the smaller it is and the lower the pressure gets.

Most commonly distribution mains operate at pressures of 10 psi or more, and the last pressure reduction to 1/4 psi occurs just prior to the customer meter. A simplified view of a gas distribution system While most residential and small commercial customers accept gas service at 1/4 psi, larger industrial and commercial customers may operate machinery that requires a higher pressure. Regardless of the ultimate delivery pressure, regulators are used to drop the pressures on the system to acceptable levels for the various end-use customers who take service from the distribution system. A natural gas regulator (on left) next to a meter Gas distribution systems are joined to transmission pipelines at an interconnect. At the interconnect are meters, regulators to control the gas pressure, and scrubbers and filters to ensure the gas is clean and free of water vapor.

  • If it has not already been injected further upstream, the distribution company will inject mercaptan into the gas.
  • Mercaptan is a harmless odorant that has the familiar smell of rotten eggs we all associate with natural gas.
  • Because natural gas has no natural odor, this odorant is added before the gas enters the distribution system so that gas can be detected in the event of a leak.

Distribution systems consist of pipe (also called mains and lines – see below), small compressors that are used to boost pressure, regulators that are used to reduce pressure, valves that are used to control flow, metering used to measure flow at each customer location, and a SCADA system that provides the capability to monitor and sometimes remotely control components of the distribution system.

In some cases, distribution systems also include local gas storage, In many areas, plastic or PVC is now used for the construction of some distribution lines. Unlike the steel pipe, PVC is flexible, corrosion-resistant and costs less to install. But in some cases, steel is still used in areas with heavy external loading or high potential for third-party damage.

In early times cast iron pipe was used for distribution and these pipes still exist in some areas. PVC distribution pipe rolls ready for installation The distribution system comprises five types of piping:

Supply main — This is the pipe that runs between the interconnection with the transmission system and the feeder mains. Supply mains can also be used to provide direct connection to a large industrial customer or power plant. Typical pressures range from 150 to 400 psi. Feeder main — This is the pipe that connects the supply main to the distribution main. Feeder mains are connected to supply mains at a regulator station that reduces the relatively high pressure of supply mains. Typical pressures for feeder mains range from 26 to 60 psi. Distribution main — This is the pipe that snakes throughout the service territory bringing gas to areas of mass consumption. Typical pressures range from 1 to 25 psi. Service line — This is the much smaller line that connects a home or business with the distribution main that may be running underneath your street or sidewalk. Typical pressures are ¼ to 1 psi, but may be higher for larger customers. Fuel line — The final connection to a customer’s appliances, the fuel line is anything beyond the LDC meter that runs into a home or office. This is owned and maintained by the property owner and typically operates at a pressure of ¼ psi or less.

How is most natural gas distributed?

Moving natural gas from production fields to markets – Natural gas transmission pipelines are wide-diameter pipelines and are often the long-distance portion of natural gas pipeline systems that connect gathering systems in producing areas, natural gas processing plants, and other receipt points to the main consumer service areas.

Interstate natural gas pipelines operate and transport natural gas across state borders. Intrastate natural gas pipelines operate and transport natural gas within a state border. Hinshaw natural gas pipelines receive natural gas from interstate pipelines and deliver it to consumers for consumption within a state border.

When natural gas arrives at the locations where it will be used (usually through large pipelines), it flows into smaller diameter pipelines called mains and then into smaller service lines that go directly to homes or buildings.

How big is the natural gas industry?

Questions Clients Ask About This Industry The market size, measured by revenue, of the Natural Gas Distribution industry was $237.5bn in 2022. What was the growth rate of the Natural Gas Distribution industry in the US in 2022? The market size of the Natural Gas Distribution industry increased 25.4% in 2022.

Who is the world’s largest supplier of natural gas?

1. United States – Production: 934 billion cubic meters The US is by far the largest producer of natural gas in the world, and represents nearly a quarter of total global natural gas production. The country’s output has increased by more than 300 billion cubic meters in the past decade owing to the increasing cost of coal, and advancements in extraction technology such as horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking.

How many people work in the fossil fuels industry?

Executive Summary – World Energy Employment – Analysis – IEA Energy employment is set to shift rapidly as countries and companies accelerate efforts to decarbonise and meet net zero emissions pledges. To date, there is no global benchmark dataset for employment across the energy sector.

  1. This report aims to provide this baseline by sector, region, and value chain segment.
  2. These estimates were calibrated against more than 15 000 data points on employment and wages gathered from national labour accounts, company reports, in-country experts, international databases and academic literature.

The end product is a first-of-its-kind assessment of global energy employment, which can serve as a foundation for policy makers and companies to understand the labour-related opportunities and challenges of an evolving global energy sector. The energy sector employed over 65 million people in 2019, equivalent to around 2% of global employment.

  1. These jobs are roughly equally distributed across fuel supply (21 million), in the power sector (20 million), and in end uses (24 million) such as energy efficiency and vehicle manufacturing.
  2. At the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, layoffs were common across geographies, especially in oil and gas supply.
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Yet, energy employment exceeds pre-pandemic levels today thanks to resilient growth in clean energy. Fossil fuel employment, however, is only set to return to pre-pandemic levels this year. Hiring gaps and tight labour markets have contributed to supply chain disruptions and project delays in many parts of the energy sector, notably offshore wind, oil and gas, and energy efficiency retrofits.

  1. Today’s global energy crisis could prompt governments and industry to rethink their global supply chain exposures especially vis-à-vis dependence on Russia’s fossil fuels.
  2. This may portend another few years of larger-than-normal shifts in energy employment.
  3. Clean energy employs over 50% of total energy workers, owing to the substantial growth of new projects coming online.

Most regions have surpassed this threshold already, though the Middle East and Russia are notable exceptions. Many clean energy segments rival the workforce in conventional energy segments. Low-carbon power generation, mainly solar and wind, employs 7.8 million, on par with oil supply.

  1. Vehicle manufacturing employment, which stands at 13.6 million globally, already employs 10% of its workforce in the manufacture of EVs, their components and batteries.
  2. Over half of energy employment is in the Asia Pacific region.
  3. Rapid energy infrastructure expansion in Asia Pacific is outpacing other regions, and lower-cost labour is enabling the emergence of significant clean energy manufacturing hubs that supply projects worldwide, notably for solar, electric and hybrid vehicles, and batteries.

China alone accounts for almost 30% of the global energy workforce. However, established energy companies in North America and Europe maintain global market strength and anchor a sizeable employment base working on domestic and overseas projects, as is the case in oil and gas, wind, and vehicle engineering.

  • The construction of new projects, including the manufacture of their components, is the largest driver of energy employment across the value chain.
  • Over 60% of the workforce is employed to develop new projects, including building power plants, bringing oil wells online and laying pipelines, manufacturing cars, carrying out efficiency retrofits and installing high-efficiency electric heat pumps.

The energy sector requires higher-skilled workers than other industries. Around 45% of energy workers today are in high-skilled occupations, compared to only one-quarter across the economy. This share is even higher for jobs in research and development for new energy innovations, many of which are set to grow rapidly to 2030.

  1. Strategic planning can ensure that scaling is not hampered by a shortage of skilled workers.
  2. Establishing market strength in these segments relies on new training and certification, and can be a focus for industry along with ministries of energy, labour, and education.
  3. Workers in coal and other fossil fuels have many of the skills needed to fill positions in growing clean energy sectors.

Fossil fuels employ almost 32 million globally today. Some companies are transferring their workers to low-carbon segments internally to retain talent, and allow for flexibility to shift workers between different business segments as needs arise. However, this is not an option everywhere, and ensuring a just transition for affected workers is a growing focus for policy makers in many regions, especially for coal, which has already seen consistent declines since 2015.

  1. In all IEA scenarios, energy employment is set to grow, outweighing declines in fossil fuel jobs.
  2. In the IEA’s Net Zero Emissions by 2050 Scenario, we estimate that 14 million new clean energy jobs are created by 2030, while another 16 million workers shift to new roles related to clean energy.
  3. Around 60% of these new jobs require some degree of post-secondary training.

Making growth in employment people-centred is key to global energy transitions. Maximising job quality helps to attract workers, including those moving from other parts of the energy sector. Energy sector wages typically see a premium over economy-wide average wages, though this premium ranges substantially from 10% to 50% across advanced economies alone.

Established industries such as nuclear, oil and gas typically offer the highest wages. Newer segments, such as solar, do not have the same labour protections and union representation as established fossil fuel industries, especially in emerging market and developing economies. The percentage of women in the energy workforce is also consistently low when compared to economy-wide averages, with less than 15% in senior management positions.

Energy employment is central to the IEA’s work on accelerating clean energy transitions globally. We will continue to analyse and model global energy employment, including with an increased focus on skills, worker demographics, and best practices for ensuring a secure and just transition.

How many people are employed in the energy industry in US?

There were more than 7.5 million individuals employed in the energy, energy efficiency, and motor vehicles sectors in the United States in the last quarter of 2020—down nearly 840,000 jobs (10%) from the end of 2019. Critical investments in infrastructure can reignite job growth in the energy sector.

How many people rely on the oil and gas industry?

API study of oil industry’s impact – The American Petroleum Institute hired PwC to review U.S. Department of Commerce data and assess the oil and natural gas industry’s economic impact based on 2019 data. Here are some results. National

Supported more than 11.3 million total jobs — 2.5 million directly and 8.8 million indirectly — or 5.6% of total U.S. employment. Generated an additional 3.5 jobs elsewhere in the U.S. economy for each direct job in the U.S. natural gas and oil industry. Produced $892.7 billion in labor income. Contributed nearly $1.7 trillion to U.S. gross domestic product, accounting for 7.9% of the national total.

Ohio

Supported 375,000 jobs — 79,000 directly and 296,000 indirectly — or 5.3% of Ohio’s total employment. Generated an additional 3.8 jobs elsewhere for each direct job in the state’s natural gas and oil industry. Provided $24.7 billion in labor income. Contributed $58.7 billion to gross domestic product, or 8.5% of the state’s total

: Study: Oil and gas industry supports more than 11 million jobs nationwide

What is the distribution of gas?

A gas distribution system, also known as a natural gas distribution system, is a network of pipelines that transports natural gas, primarily methane, from a production facility such as a refinery or bulk distributor to customers. It is designed to ensure that the correct amount and pressure of gas reaches each customer and prevent any hazardous leaks in the process.

  1. Gas distribution systems are an integral part of our daily lives, delivering gas to businesses across the country.
  2. They form an important part of modern infrastructure, enabling the safe and efficient delivery of natural gas products with minimal environmental impact.
  3. In this blog, consumers can look at what a gas distribution system is and how it works.

It will also discuss why they are so important to our society, and the potential risks associated with their use. Finally, consumers can explore some of the current methods used for managing the safety and reliability of these systems.

What is the process of gas distribution?

Central gas supply systems (CGS) are based on high volume gas delivery and on-site gas stocking in cylinders, multi-cylinder packages (bundles), cryogenic vessels with vaporizers or in special containers. Gas distribution is provided by pipe line from the central point up to the final application place.

Gas goes from the source through high pressure manifold with pressure regulator where the inlet pressure from the bulk is reduced to the level acceptable for the pipes and other components of the gas distribution system. At the end of the pipeline outlet points would be fitted to set gas parameters e.g.

pressure and flow-rate according to request. When CGS systems are installed in industrial plants, working efficiency, economic savings and also safety aspects will grow in relation to increased gas consumption. Main benefits:

Reliable supply system with continuous gas delivery (no gas flow interruptions) More precise gas parameters adjustment Higher safety level because of high pressure gas storage and installation located in specified and safe place More space at the working place Usually lower gas costs due to high volume delivery

Main fields of use of industrial CGS:

Automotive and transportation Metal & glass & plastics & paper production and fabrication Flame, arc, plasma and laser welding and cutting processes Chemical & petrochemical industry Metallurgy Oil & gas rafinery Off-shore & shipyards Energy and power Ecology & environment Food & beverages production and packaging Craftsmen & workshops On-site constructions

Case Study

What are the 4 types of natural gas?

What Main Types of Gas Make Up Natural Gas? – Generally speaking, there are four naturally occurring gases, W hen mixed in the correct proportions, they create natural gas. They are known as the four natural gases and include the first four alkanes — methane, ethane, butane, and propane.

  • An alkane is a hydrocarbon where single bonds link together each atom.
  • Hydrocarbons are chemical compounds made up exclusively of carbon and hydrogen atoms.
  • Methane, ethane, butane, and propane — the grouping of alkanes used to compose natural gas — have a lot in common.
  • They are all colorless, odorless, and flammable gases.

However, they all have different molecular structures and individual uses.

Which industry uses the most natural gas?

Electricity generation and heating are the primary uses for natural gas in the United States – Most U.S. natural gas use is for generating electricity and for heating, but some consuming sectors have other uses for natural gas. The electric power sector uses natural gas to generate electricity and produce useful thermal output,

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In 2022, the electric power sector accounted for about 38% of total U.S. natural gas consumption, and natural gas was the source of about 33% of the U.S. electric power sector’s primary energy consumption. Most of U.S. electric power sector electricity generation is sold to (purchased by) the energy end-use consuming sectors—commercial, industrial, residential, and transportation.

The energy content of electricity sales is included in each sector’s end-use energy consumption.2 The industrial and commercial sectors also use natural gas to generate electricity, and they use nearly all of this electricity themselves as direct use,

Natural gas accounted for about 40% of total utility-scale U.S. electricity generation by all sectors in 2022. In 2022, the industrial sector accounted for about 32% of total U.S. natural gas consumption, and natural gas was the source of about 41% of the U.S. industrial sector’s end-use energy consumption,

Industry uses natural gas for many purposes, including as a feedstock (raw material) to make products and to generate electricity. In 2022, the residential sector accounted for about 15% of total U.S. natural gas consumption, and natural gas was the source of about 42% of U.S.

  • Residential sector end-use energy consumption,
  • About 60% of U.S.
  • Homes use natural gas for space and water heating, cooking, and drying clothes.
  • In 2022, the commercial sector accounted for about 11% of total U.S.
  • Natural gas consumption, and natural gas was the source of about 24% of the commercial sector end-use energy consumption,

Natural gas is one of the primary sources of energy in U.S. commercial buildings, Some consumers in the commercial sector also use natural gas as a fuel to generate electricity and in combined heat and power systems. In 2022, the transportation sector accounted for about 4% of total U.S.

Which country has the most natural gas resources?

Top 10 Countries with the Largest Natural Gas Reserves (2020): –

Rank Country 2020 Reserves (Cubic Meters) 2020 Reserves (Cubic Feet) % of Global Reserves
1 Russia 37.4 trillion 1320.5 trillion 19.9%
2 Iran 32.1 trillion 1133.6 trillion 17.1%
3 Qatar 24.7 trillion 871.1 trillion 13.1%
4 Turkmenistan 13.6 trillion 480.3 trillion 7.2%
5 United States 12.6 trillion 445.6 trillion 6.7%
6 China 8.4 trillion 296.6 trillion 4.5%
7 Venezuela 6.3 trillion 221.1 trillion 3.3%
8 Saudi Arabia 6.0 trillion 212.6 trillion 3.2%
9 United Arab Emirates 5.9 trillion 209.7 trillion 3.2%
10 Nigeria 5.5 trillion 193.3 trillion 2.9%

Russia has the largest natural gas reserves in the world and exports more natural gas than any other country, shipping an estimated 238 billion cubic meters of gas in 2020. Natural gas for automotive use is highly encouraged in Russia. Aftermarket kits are sold by companies and some vehicles are manufactured to be fueled by natural gas.

Gazprom, the state controlled natural company, was projected to have 500 filling stations by the end of 2020. Iran has the world’s second-largest natural gas reserves. Iran is one of the most hydrocarbon-rich areas in the world, with roughly 145 hydrocarbon fields and 297 oil and gas reservoirs discovered so far and the potential for more.

At present, Iran is utilizing only a small portion of its gas reserves, making it one of the few countries capable of supplying much larger amounts of natural gas in the future. Qatar holds just over 13% of total world natural gas reserves. The majority of the country’s reserves are located in the offshore North Field.

  1. In an effort to expand its natural gas export and reclaim its place as the world’s top liquefied natural gas exporter, Qatar began drilling expansion in North Field and plans on increasing output by 60%.
  2. The United States has an abundance of natural gas reserves, the largest of which are located in Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana,

It is estimated that the United States has enough natural gas to last at least another 60 years or more. In addition to its own natural gas production, the U.S. also imports natural gas from Canada and Mexico in pipelines. Saudi Arabia has the fifth-largest natural gas reserves in the world, mostly located in the Persian Gulf.

Is natural gas part of the oil industry?

Oil Field, Saratoga, Texas,1908. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. Oil and natural gas are major industries in the energy market and play an influential role in the global economy as the world’s primary fuel sources. The processes and systems involved in producing and distributing oil and gas are highly complex, capital-intensive, and require state-of-the-art technology.

  • Historically, natural gas has been linked to oil, mainly because of the production process or upstream side of the business.
  • For much of the history of the industry, natural gas was viewed as a nuisance and even today is flared in large quantities in some parts of the world, including the United States.

Natural gas has taken on a more prominent role in the world’s energy supply as a consequence of shale gas development in the United States, as mentioned above, and its lower greenhouse gas emissions when combusted when compared to oil and coal. This guide looks at the business of oil and gas and is intended to serve as a research aid to sources worldwide, with a specific emphasis on the United States.

upstream, the business of oil and gas exploration and production; midstream, transportation and storage; and downstream, which includes refining and marketing.

These three areas are reflected in the organization of the guide. Renewable and alternative energy companies are discussed in our Renewable Energy Industries: A Research Guide and Green Business: Sources of Information Guide, For an overview U.S. energy sources, there have been a number of Congressional Research Service reports on renewable energy topics, including:

Does natural gas have a future?

Policy makers and regulators – The role of policy makers and regulators will be critical in establishing the pace of decarbonization and the appropriate market incentives to shape the role of gas to support the penetration of renewables, such as the provision of flexible dispatch in power generation to compensate for intermittency in solar and wind power.

  1. If the power system relies on gas for flexibility, then capacity markets or other mechanisms will be required to ensure that necessary investments are made in the gas system.
  2. Under current decarbonization policies, natural gas will continue to play an important role in North America’s energy mix over the coming decades.

Stated simply, North America will continue to rely on gas for domestic use and exports, although domestic demand will start to decline after 2035. The use of gas in power generation will decline as renewables, new energy-storage solutions, and energy carriers such as hydrogen become more prominent in the mix.

Is the natural gas industry growing?

U.S. natural gas production and LNG exports will likely grow through 2050 in AEO2023 April 27, 2023 Data source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, (AEO2023) In our (AEO2023) Reference case, we project U.S. natural gas production to increase 15% and liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports to increase 152% between 2022 and 2050. We expect natural gas production to rise to 42.1 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) by 2050.

Production growth is largely driven by U.S. LNG exports, which we expect to rise to 10 Tcf by 2050. Natural gas production growth on the Gulf Coast and in the Southwest reflects increased activity in the Haynesville Formation and Permian Basin, which are close to infrastructure connecting natural gas supply to growing LNG export facilities.

In our AEO2023, we explore long-term energy trends in the United States and present an outlook for energy markets through 2050. We use different scenarios, called cases, to understand how varying assumptions affect energy trends. The AEO2023 Reference case, which serves as a baseline, or benchmark, reflects laws and regulations adopted through mid-November 2022, including the Inflation Reduction Act. Data source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, (AEO2023) In the Reference case, we project that annual natural gas production from 2022 through 2050 will grow by 52% on the Gulf Coast and by 50% in the Southwest. Because the Haynesville Formation and the Permian Basin are close to LNG export terminals in Texas and Louisiana, the amount of natural gas produced in these regions has grown as LNG demand has grown.

from oil formations, another notable contributor to natural gas production, contributes to production growth in the Southwest. We project continued rising global demand for natural gas, which makes it economical to build additional LNG export facilities in the United States. New became fully operational in 2022, ahead of schedule.

In addition, new LNG trains in Texas are scheduled to be, We project that across some side cases, production increases during the projection period. We project the most growth in U.S. natural gas production in the High Oil and Gas Supply case and High Oil Price case.

In the Low Oil and Gas Supply case, U.S. oil production declines, which reduces and shale production and shrinks natural gas production on the Gulf Coast and in the Southwest. In the Low Oil Price case, we project a lower Brent oil price, which reduces LNG exports below current levels in the near term through crude oil-linked international LNG pricing and results in underutilized capacity by 2050.

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However, in this case, increased Gulf Coast shale production enables natural gas production in this region to grow through 2050, despite declines in all other regions. Principal contributor: Matthew Corne : U.S. natural gas production and LNG exports will likely grow through 2050 in AEO2023

Is LNG the future?

LNG Outlook 2023 and Global LNG Demand Forecast – A newly released Global LNG Outlook by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA) projects that global liquefied natural gas (LNG) supplies will remain tight through 2025. Global LNG outlook for 2023 can remain strong but LNG demand growth will eventually decline, but not until 2030 – when Europe’s decarbonisation and energy security policies take effect.

Who produces natural gas in Europe?

Chemicals & Resources Fossil Fuels

Premium Premium statistics Industry-specific and extensively researched technical data (partially from exclusive partnerships). A paid subscription is required for full access. Russia and Norway are by far the largest producers of natural gas in Europe.

What 2 countries have the biggest natural gas reserves?

Natural Gas Reserves by Country

# Country Gas Reserves (MMcf)
1 Russia 1,688,228,000
2 Iran 1,201,382,000
3 Qatar 871,585,000
4 United States 368,704,000

Who are the gas producers in Europe?

The total natural gas production of Europe increased by 14.71% in 2022 when compared to 2021. The largest gas producing countries in Europe are Norway, United Kingdom, Netherlands. Through to 2030, annual gas production is forecasted to decrease by a CAGR of 7.9%.

  1. GlobalData uses proprietary data and analytics to provide a complete picture of the global oil & gas fields segment.
  2. Buy the latest oil & gas fields profiles here.
  3. In 2022, Norway had the highest natural gas production, followed by United Kingdom and Netherlands.
  4. Here are the 10 largest natural gas fields in Europe by production in 2022, according to GlobalData’s Oil & Gas, Upstream Fields Database.1.

Troll Troll is located in North Sea, Norway. This natural gas field is owned by ConocoPhillips, Equinor, Petoro, Shell, TotalEnergies and operated by Equinor Energy. The field produced 3,846.97mmcfd in 2022 and recovered 60.46% of its total recoverable natural gas reserves.

  1. Based on GlobalData estimates, production will continue until the field reaches its economic limit in 2060.
  2. Buy the profile here,2.
  3. Ormen Ormen Lange is located in Norwegian Sea, Norway.
  4. This natural gas field is owned by Eni, Equinor, HitecVision, Petoro, Polskie Gornictwo Naftowe i Gazownictwo, Shell and operated by Norske Shell.

The field produced 924.3mmcfd in 2022 and recovered 85.67% of its total recoverable natural gas reserves. Based on GlobalData estimates, production will continue until the field reaches its economic limit in 2034. Buy the profile here,3. Aasta Hansteen Aasta Hansteen is located in Norwegian Sea, Norway.

This natural gas field is owned by BASF, ConocoPhillips, Equinor, LetterOne Holdings, OMV and operated by Equinor Energy. The field produced 859.52mmcfd in 2022 and recovered 47.96% of its total recoverable natural gas reserves. Based on GlobalData estimates, production will continue until the field reaches its economic limit in 2040.

Buy the profile here,4. Snøhvit Snøhvit is located in Barents Sea, Norway. This natural gas field is owned by BASF, Equinor, LetterOne Holdings, Neptune Energy Group, Petoro, TotalEnergies and operated by Equinor Energy. The field produced 735.54mmcfd in 2022 and recovered 31.81% of its total recoverable natural gas reserves.

Based on GlobalData estimates, production will continue until the field reaches its economic limit in 2064. Buy the profile here,5. Skarv Skarv is located in Norwegian Sea, Norway. This natural gas field is owned by Aker BP, BASF, Equinor, LetterOne Holdings, Polskie Gornictwo Naftowe i Gazownictwo and operated by Aker BP,

The field produced 595.87mmcfd in 2022 and recovered 39.79% of its total recoverable natural gas reserves. Based on GlobalData estimates, production will continue until the field reaches its economic limit in 2042. Buy the profile here,6. Åsgard Åsgard is located in Norwegian Sea, Norway.

This natural gas field is owned by Eni, Equinor, HitecVision, Petoro, TotalEnergies and operated by Equinor Energy. The field produced 534.49mmcfd in 2022 and recovered 94.23% of its total recoverable natural gas reserves. Based on GlobalData estimates, production will continue until the field reaches its economic limit in 2034.

Buy the profile here,7. Culzean Culzean is located in North Sea, United Kingdom. This natural gas field is owned by BP, HitecVision, TotalEnergies and operated by TotalEnergies E&P North Sea UK. The field produced 531.88mmcfd in 2022 and recovered 40.3% of its total recoverable natural gas reserves.

  • Based on GlobalData estimates, production will continue until the field reaches its economic limit in 2051.
  • Buy the profile here,8.
  • Ærfugl Ærfugl is located in Norwegian Sea, Norway.
  • This natural gas field is owned by Aker BP, BASF, Equinor, LetterOne Holdings, Polskie Gornictwo Naftowe i Gazownictwo and operated by Aker BP.

The field produced 405.91mmcfd in 2022 and recovered 13.03% of its total recoverable natural gas reserves. Based on GlobalData estimates, production will continue until the field reaches its economic limit in 2061. Buy the profile here,9. Dvalin Dvalin is located in Norwegian Sea, Norway.

This natural gas field is owned by BASF, LetterOne Holdings, Petoro, Solveig Gas Norway and operated by Wintershall Dea Norge. The field produced 285mmcfd in 2022 and recovered 16.25% of its total recoverable natural gas reserves. Based on GlobalData estimates, production will continue until the field reaches its economic limit in 2063.

Buy the profile here,10. Kvitebjørn Kvitebjørn is located in North Sea, Norway. This natural gas field is owned by Equinor, Petoro, Polskie Gornictwo Naftowe i Gazownictwo, Sval Energi, TotalEnergies and operated by Equinor Energy. The field produced 275.06mmcfd in 2022 and recovered 88.24% of its total recoverable natural gas reserves.

How many people rely on the oil and gas industry?

API study of oil industry’s impact – The American Petroleum Institute hired PwC to review U.S. Department of Commerce data and assess the oil and natural gas industry’s economic impact based on 2019 data. Here are some results. National

Supported more than 11.3 million total jobs — 2.5 million directly and 8.8 million indirectly — or 5.6% of total U.S. employment. Generated an additional 3.5 jobs elsewhere in the U.S. economy for each direct job in the U.S. natural gas and oil industry. Produced $892.7 billion in labor income. Contributed nearly $1.7 trillion to U.S. gross domestic product, accounting for 7.9% of the national total.

Ohio

Supported 375,000 jobs — 79,000 directly and 296,000 indirectly — or 5.3% of Ohio’s total employment. Generated an additional 3.8 jobs elsewhere for each direct job in the state’s natural gas and oil industry. Provided $24.7 billion in labor income. Contributed $58.7 billion to gross domestic product, or 8.5% of the state’s total

: Study: Oil and gas industry supports more than 11 million jobs nationwide

What industry uses the most natural gas?

Electricity generation and heating are the primary uses for natural gas in the United States – Most U.S. natural gas use is for generating electricity and for heating, but some consuming sectors have other uses for natural gas. The electric power sector uses natural gas to generate electricity and produce useful thermal output,

In 2022, the electric power sector accounted for about 38% of total U.S. natural gas consumption, and natural gas was the source of about 33% of the U.S. electric power sector’s primary energy consumption. Most of U.S. electric power sector electricity generation is sold to (purchased by) the energy end-use consuming sectors—commercial, industrial, residential, and transportation.

The energy content of electricity sales is included in each sector’s end-use energy consumption.2 The industrial and commercial sectors also use natural gas to generate electricity, and they use nearly all of this electricity themselves as direct use,

  1. Natural gas accounted for about 40% of total utility-scale U.S.
  2. Electricity generation by all sectors in 2022.
  3. In 2022, the industrial sector accounted for about 32% of total U.S.
  4. Natural gas consumption, and natural gas was the source of about 41% of the U.S.
  5. Industrial sector’s end-use energy consumption,

Industry uses natural gas for many purposes, including as a feedstock (raw material) to make products and to generate electricity. In 2022, the residential sector accounted for about 15% of total U.S. natural gas consumption, and natural gas was the source of about 42% of U.S.

  1. Residential sector end-use energy consumption,
  2. About 60% of U.S.
  3. Homes use natural gas for space and water heating, cooking, and drying clothes.
  4. In 2022, the commercial sector accounted for about 11% of total U.S.
  5. Natural gas consumption, and natural gas was the source of about 24% of the commercial sector end-use energy consumption,

Natural gas is one of the primary sources of energy in U.S. commercial buildings, Some consumers in the commercial sector also use natural gas as a fuel to generate electricity and in combined heat and power systems. In 2022, the transportation sector accounted for about 4% of total U.S.