How Long Does Valium Stay In Your System

When does Valium peak?

After oral administration >90% of diazepam is absorbed and the average time to achieve peak plasma concentrations is 1 – 1.5 hours with a range of 0.25 to 2.5 hours. Absorption is delayed and decreased when administered with a moderate fat meal.

How long after taking 10mg of diazepam can you drive?

Abstract – Psychomotor skills and visual functions related to driving were measured double-blind cross-over in ten healthy volunteers before, and 1,3,5 and 7 h after a single oral administration of diazepam (10mg), medazepam (15 mg) or lorazepam (2.5 mg).

The late effects of lorazepam were tested in seven other subjects 12 and 24 h after the administration. Lorazepam impaired almost all the measured skills more (P less than 0.05 to 0.001) than diazepam, medizepam or the placebo. The lorazepam impairment of reactive skills and flicker fusion discrimination remained statistically significant (P less than 0.05) for as long as 12 h.

Medazepam impaired only reactive skills and flicker fusion, the latter remaining impaired (P less than 0.05) for as long a 5 h after the administration. The magnitude and duration of the effects of diazepam were intermediate between those of lorazepam and medazepam.

Diazepam impaired perceptual speed and reactive and co-ordinative skills as well as flicker fusion discrimination and visual parameters related to driving. Slight impairments in performance were measurable for up to 5 h after administration but at 7 h the results resembled those measured after the placebo.

The lack of alterations in adaptation to darkness, sensitivity to brightness or visual discrimination ability in bright counterlight at a time when flicker fusion discrimination was severely depressed suggests that an impaired ability to discriminate flickering light is of no or little clinical significance to driving ability.

How long after 5mg diazepam can I drink alcohol?

Can I Have a Beer After Diazepam? – You should avoid drinking any alcohol, including beer, while you are taking diazepam. They are both sedatives and combining them can result in unpleasant symptoms including drowsiness, and confusion and it can even prove fatal.

Can I drive after taking 5mg diazepam?

Important – Tell your doctor that you take diazepam if you’re going to be put to sleep (using a general anaesthetic) or having any kind of major operation. Can I take diazepam with me if I’m travelling abroad? It depends on which country you’re travelling to.

Different countries have different rules and regulations for diazepam. It’s important to plan ahead and find out whether you can take your medicine abroad, It’s best to only take the amount that you need while abroad. You can check the rules by contacting the embassy for the country you’re visiting. You can find a full list of foreign embassies in the UK on the GOV.UK website,

Will it affect my contraception? Diazepam will not affect any type of contraception, including the combined pill and emergency contraception, But some contraceptive pills can keep diazepam in your body for longer and increase its effect. You can also get bleeding in between your periods if you take diazepam and contraceptive pills together.

  1. But your contraception will still work.
  2. Can I drive or ride a bike? Do not drive a car or ride a bike if diazepam makes you sleepy, gives you blurred vision, or makes you feel dizzy, clumsy or unable to concentrate or make decisions.
  3. This may be more likely when you first start taking diazepam, but it could happen at any time, for example when starting another medicine.

It’s an offence to drive a car if your ability to drive safely is affected. It’s your responsibility to decide if it’s safe to drive. If you’re in any doubt, do not drive. Even if your ability to drive is not affected, the police have the right to request a saliva sample to check how much diazepam is in your body.

Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you’re unsure whether it’s safe for you to drive while taking diazepam. GOV.UK has more information on the law on drugs and driving, Can I operate machinery or tools while I’m taking it? Do not operate machinery or tools if you get any side effects, such as feeling sleepy, being forgetful, or poor co-ordination.

Can I drink alcohol while taking diazepam? Do not drink alcohol while you’re taking diazepam. Alcohol can increase the effects of diazepam. It can make you go into a very deep sleep. There’s a risk you will not be able to breathe properly, and you may have difficulty waking up.

Is there any food or drink I need to avoid? Grapefruit juice may increase the amount of diazepam in your blood. It’s a good idea to avoid grapefruit or grapefruit juice while taking diazepam. Caffeine is a stimulant and may reduce the calming effects of diazepam. It’s best not to have drinks like coffee, tea, cola and energy drinks because they contain caffeine.

Do not drink alcohol while you’re taking diazepam. Will recreational drugs affect it? Using cannabis, heroin or methadone with diazepam will increase the drowsy effects of diazepam. It can make you go into a very deep sleep. There’s a risk you will not be able to breathe properly, and you may have difficulty waking up.

try a book or online course on anxiety exercise regularlylearn to relaxavoid caffeine quit smoking if you cantry not to drink alcoholcontact support groups run by charities like Anxiety UK, Mind and Rethink Mental Illness

If you’re having trouble sleeping, there are some things you can do to help with insomnia and getting to sleep:

set regular times for going to bed and waking uprelax before bedtime – try taking a warm bath or listening to calming musicuse thick curtains or blinds, an eye mask and earplugs to stop you being woken up by light and noiseavoid caffeine, cigarettes, vaping, alcohol, heavy meals and exercise for a few hours before going to beddo not watch TV or use phones, tablets or computers just before going to beddo not nap during the daywrite a list of your worries, and any ideas about how to solve them, before you go to bed to help you forget about them until the morning

Is diazepam a sleeping pill?

Diazepam is a benzodiazepine sleeping pill. It is also known by the trade names Dialar, Diazemuls, Diazepam Desitin, Diazepam Rectubes, Stesolid and Tensium. It is a class C controlled medicine. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has information about controlled medicines.

Is 1 mg of diazepam a lot?

Dosage for tablets and liquid – The usual dose is:

anxiety – 2mg, taken 3 times a day, this can be increased to 5mg to 10mg, taken 3 times a daysleep problems (related to anxiety) – 5mg to 15mg, taken once a day at bedtimemuscle spasms in adults – 2mg to 15 mg a day. This can be taken as 1mg twice a day and can go up to 5mg taken 3 times a day. The dose can be increased to up to 20mg, taken 3 times a day if neededmuscle spasms in children (aged 1 month to 17 years) – the dose varies depending on age. It’s usually taken twice a day, with 10 to 12 hours between each dose

Your dose might be lower if you’re over 65 or have kidney or liver problems or severe breathing problems.

Can I have a glass of wine with diazepam?

Interactions Between Alcohol And Diazepam – Diazepam and alcohol are both central nervous system depressants. Therefore, the effects of mixing diazepam and alcohol can not only be be unpleasant but, in some cases, life-threatening. Mixing diazepham with alcohol can lead to:

Confusion. Disorientation. Accidents. Sedation. Stumbling. Dizziness. Nausea. Loss of consciousness. Addiction. Brain damage. Coma. Death.

If you or a loved one is addicted to diazepam and alcohol, it’s important that you get help now. Our admissions navigators are available to speak with you about treatment at any time of day. Please call our 24-hour hotline at if you need information about treatment for addiction for yourself or for a loved one.

Does diazepam make you feel spaced out?

– Diazepam can make you feel sleepy, dizzy and forgetful when you first start taking it. You might also find it difficult to concentrate during the first few days of treatment and may experience blurred vision and muscle weakness. For these reasons, you should not ride a bike or drive a car until you know how you will be affected.

You should also be very careful when doing anything else that requires concentration, such as operating machinery or exercising. The effects of diazepam can last a while after taking it, so even if you only take one dose, you may feel them the next day. It’s important not to drive, ride a bike or operate machinery if you feel that your ability to concentrate has been compromised by taking diazepam.

Diazepam is in a group of medicines listed in new laws in the Road Traffic Act 1988. It is an offence to drive while under the influence of this medicine but you are NOT committing a crime if the medicine has been prescribed to you by a doctor, you are sticking to the prescribed dose and it is not affecting your ability to drive safely.

Can I take 2 diazepam 5mg at once?

Standard Valium Dosage – Understanding what constitutes a standard Valium dose regimen can better illustrate this point. Doctors generally recommend the drug should be used at dosages of 2-10 mg. This amount can be taken up to four times in a 24-hour time frame.

How many days in a row can you take diazepam?

Diazepam dosage – The diazepam dose prescribed and how often to take it will be individualised for you or your child depending on your personal circumstances. It’s important that you take diazepam exactly as directed by your doctor. Never take diazepam at a higher dose or for longer than prescribed by your doctor.

The usual dose for anxiety is 2mg taken 3 times a day (this can be increased to 5mg to 10mg 3 times a day.), for anxiety-related insomnia is 5mg to 15mg taken once a day at bedtime, and for muscle spasms in adults is 2mg to 15 mg a day although in some cases this can be increased under medical supervision to 20mg 3 times a day if needed.

(In children aged 17 years and under with muscle spasm the dose varies depending on age but is usually given twice a day, with 10 to 12 hours between each dose.

  • Diazepam is usually taken as tablets or syrup and these start to work half an hour to an hour after taking a dose. Diazepam is given by injection or rectal solution (enema) when a faster response is needed.
  • Diazepam tablets and syrup can be taken either with or without food.
  • You might be asked to take a dose once, twice or three times a day, or just one single dose if you’re having it as a pre-med.

If you forget to take a dose at your usual time take it as soon as you remember, unless it’s nearly time for your next dose. In this case just leave out the missed dose. Don’t take a double dose to make up for a missed dose. Diazepam is generally only suitable for short-term use, because over time your body can become tolerant to its effects, so higher doses are needed to get the same effect.

It’s also possible to develop a physical or psychological dependence on diazepam. It’s generally only prescribed for two to four weeks at most, including a period where the dose is gradually reduced. Don’t stop taking diazepam suddenly unless your doctor tells you to. Your dose will usually be reduced over a few days or weeks to avoid your problem coming back.

This will also help avoid possible withdrawal effects such as headaches, muscle pain and feeling anxious, restless or irritable. Always follow the instructions given by your doctor. JGI/Jamie Grill Getty Images

How long before a flight should I take diazepam?

Quick question re diazepam to calm nerves when flying.); $dispatch(‘mobile-search-menu-opened’) }, closeMobileSearch() } x-show=open x-on:open-mobile-search.window=openMobileSearch() x-cloak=> Please or to access all these features Top Bottom bookworm1982 · 18/06/2022 14:08 Hi all, I’m have a four hour flight to Greece tomorrow, and I absolutely loathe flying. My doctor has prescribed me with six diazepam 2mg tablets – three for way there and three for way back. She says I should take two, third is for backup. Anyway, one thing I forgot to ask the doctor is how soon before I fly should I take the first one for it to take full effect?? As soon as I board? Do they work immediately? They need to be working their magic for when we take off 🤪 I can’t get back in touch with doc to ask. Any help much appreciated!! And any tips on how to handle my fear of flying also much appreciated xxx OP posts: Whatifthisisit · 18/06/2022 14:12 I find 40 minutes before takeoff optimum time. Whatifthisisit · 18/06/2022 14:14 And don’t worry about the flight. You will be relaxed at takeoff and by the time you land pretty much back to normal. user1477249785 · 18/06/2022 14:15 When I used to take them, I did it as they called boarding. Whataplanker · 18/06/2022 14:27 About 30 mins does the job for me. shinynewapple22 · 18/06/2022 14:31 I normally take just before we walk down to the Gate. I used to take a higher dose and also take a couple before we traveled to the airport- but one good thing of being able to manage my anxiety on flights by taking the diazepam is that I am no longer so nervous and recently have got by on just the one tablet before take off, Isaidnoalready · 18/06/2022 14:33 I couldn’t walk straight after two of them three would coma me 🤣 About 30/40 minutes prior is ideal and you might get a dry cotton mouth so ask for water FlibbertyGibbitt · 18/06/2022 14:34 Half an hour, I used to take them just as I sat on the plane, Still felt nervous but took the edge off, you might be able to snooze as well. Saying this I can’t snooze as I’m helping the pilot fly the plane ! JaneJeffer · 18/06/2022 14:42 FlibbertyGibbitt · 18/06/2022 14:34 Half an hour, I used to take them just as I sat on the plane, Still felt nervous but took the edge off, you might be able to snooze as well. Saying this I can’t snooze as I’m helping the pilot fly the plane ! bookworm1982 · 18/06/2022 20:29 FlibbertyGibbitt · 18/06/2022 14:34 Half an hour, I used to take them just as I sat on the plane, Still felt nervous but took the edge off, you might be able to snooze as well. Saying this I can’t snooze as I’m helping the pilot fly the plane ! OP posts: bookworm1982 · 18/06/2022 20:29 Thanks everyone. Half an hour before it is then!! Xxx OP posts: BackToTheTop · 18/06/2022 20:38 Yes another one for half an hour before take off, I’d take on 2mg tablet, have a vodka and tonic on the plane and I’d usually fall asleep or be chilled out user1477249785 · 18/06/2022 21:39 FlibbertyGibbitt · 18/06/2022 14:34 Half an hour, I used to take them just as I sat on the plane, Still felt nervous but took the edge off, you might be able to snooze as well. Saying this I can’t snooze as I’m helping the pilot fly the plane ! Ha ha. You’ve frightened people but I know exactly what you mean! Sitting in your seat in row 32, analysing every noise and wondering why the pilot has started the descent already and if he’s realised there’s a flappy thing on the window. I do this too. FlibbertyGibbitt · 18/06/2022 21:41 user1477249785 · 18/06/2022 21:39 Ha ha. You’ve frightened people but I know exactly what you mean! Sitting in your seat in row 32, analysing every noise and wondering why the pilot has started the descent already and if he’s realised there’s a flappy thing on the window. I do this too. FlibbertyGibbitt · 18/06/2022 14:34 Half an hour, I used to take them just as I sat on the plane, Still felt nervous but took the edge off, you might be able to snooze as well. Saying this I can’t snooze as I’m helping the pilot fly the plane ! This I don’t actually fly the plane as I’m not a pilot however I’m there in spirit in the cockpit 🤪 BattenburgDonkey · 18/06/2022 21:42 Sorry to jump on, but can you take these if you have kids with you? Terrified of flying but want to take the kids on holiday, DH would be there too but I don’t want to scare the kids if they make me act daft 😅 Moonshine86 · 18/06/2022 21:43 Half hour before under your tongue. BuffaloCauliflower · 18/06/2022 21:47 If you’re not used to them you may need only one, definitely see how you feel before taking the other. They’ll last a good couple of hours. Don’t take it before you get on the plane. Be very wary about having any alcohol on top. SiobhanSharpe · 18/06/2022 21:51 I usually take one about 15 minutes before I even get to the airport as the whole experience – check-in, security and passport control are in the ninth circle of hell. i hate crowds and queuing as well as the actual flight. I pay extra to go through fast track security as I’m afraid of having a panic attack if I’m in a snaking queue and can’t see any way out. I pay extra to use an airport lounge as thrykre an oasis of peace and calm compared with the departure ‘lounge’ area. Last time I flew, pre-covid now, there were no seats available at all in the departure lounge, It was incredibly crowded. SiobhanSharpe · 18/06/2022 21:57 posted too soon. So by the time I get on the plane I’m already calm. I find one tablet will last 3-4 hours (5mg). Two would knock me out but i’d take another after that if i was flying long haul. They also helped me cope with the Channel tunnel, I don’t need to take them for that any more. SiobhanSharpe · 18/06/2022 22:03 BattenburgDonkey · 18/06/2022 21:42 Sorry to jump on, but can you take these if you have kids with you? Terrified of flying but want to take the kids on holiday, DH would be there too but I don’t want to scare the kids if they make me act daft 😅 I can’t speak for anyone else but they definitely don’t make me act daft, I’m just a bit zoned out – sort of one step removed from reality and a bit cocooned from the chaos of the airport, the nerves and the fear on the plane. I don’t drink alcohol with it. BackToTheTop · 18/06/2022 22:04 BattenburgDonkey · 18/06/2022 21:42 Sorry to jump on, but can you take these if you have kids with you? Terrified of flying but want to take the kids on holiday, DH would be there too but I don’t want to scare the kids if they make me act daft 😅 I take them when giving presentations at work for stage fright. I take 2mg, and can then do a full on, presentation in front of loads of people, I can answer questions and I’m sharp and not knocked out or slow at all, so You’ll be fine looking after kids. They just take the edge off my anxiety and bring it to a normal level. mnnewbie111 · 18/06/2022 22:05 FlibbertyGibbitt · 18/06/2022 14:34 Half an hour, I used to take them just as I sat on the plane, Still felt nervous but took the edge off, you might be able to snooze as well. Saying this I can’t snooze as I’m helping the pilot fly the plane ! Squiff70 · 18/06/2022 22:50 2mg is a very low dose, as is 4mg (if you take two of the 2mg). Take them half an hour before departure, so as they are about to start loading you onto the plane. It’s extremely unlikely you’ll be actually drowsy but it’s possible if it’s your first time taking them. They will just take the edge off your anxiety. bookworm1982 · 07/07/2022 15:57 Thanks for all the help everyone. flight went well, but I think it helped that there was very little turbulence 👍🏻 I even relaxed enough to have a cup of tea and a Kit Kat! Please create an account To comment on this thread you need to create a Mumsnet account. Math.max( 25, Math.floor( 0.15 * (type === ‘x’ ? window.innerWidth || document.body.clientWidth : window.innerHeight || document.body.clientHeight) ) ), // Minimum velocity the gesture must be moving when the gesture ends to be // considered a swipe. velocityThreshold: 5, // Used to calculate the distance threshold to ignore the gestures velocity // and always consider it a swipe. disregardVelocityThreshold: (type, self) => Math.floor(0.5 * (type === ‘x’ ? self.element.clientWidth : self.element.clientHeight)), // Point at which the pointer moved too much to consider it a tap or longpress // gesture. pressThreshold: 8, // If true, swiping in a diagonal direction will fire both a horizontal and a // vertical swipe. // If false, whichever direction the pointer moved more will be the only swipe // fired. diagonalSwipes: false, // The degree limit to consider a swipe when diagonalSwipes is true. diagonalLimit: Math.tan(((45 * 1.5) / 180) * Math.PI), // Listen to mouse events in addition to touch events. (For desktop support.) mouseSupport: true, } const gesture = new TinyGesture($refs.modal, options); gesture.on(‘swipeleft’, () => ); gesture.on(‘swiperight’, () => ); } } x-on:keydown.left=$dispatch(‘modal-navigate-left’) x-on:keydown.right=$dispatch(‘modal-navigate-right’) x-on:keydown.esc=$dispatch(‘modal-esc’) x-init=handleSwipe() x-ref=modal> ) ; > : Quick question re diazepam to calm nerves when flying.

You might be interested:  How Many Home Alone Movies Are There?

How long is diazepam 5mg effective?

6. Response and effectiveness –

The peak effects of diazepam are seen within 1 to 1.5 hours in most people. Diazepam is metabolized to active metabolites and its effects may last for more than 24 hours and extend with repeated dosing as the drug accumulates in the body.

When does 5mg diazepam peak?

Mechanism of Action – Benzodiazepines exert their effects by facilitating the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid(GABA) at various sites. Specifically, benzodiazepines bind at an allosteric site at the interface between the alpha and gamma subunits on GABA-A receptor chloride ion channels. The allosteric binding of diazepam at the GABA-A receptor increases the frequency at which the chloride channel opens, leading to an increased conductance of chloride ions. This shift in charge leads to a hyperpolarization of the neuronal membrane and reduced neuronal excitability. Specifically, the allosteric binding within the limbic system leads to the anxiolytic effects seen with diazepam. Allosteric binding within the spinal cord and motor neurons is the primary mediator of the myorelaxant effects seen with diazepam. Mediation of the sedative, amnestic, and anticonvulsant effects of diazepam is through receptor binding within the cortex, thalamus, and cerebellum. Pharmacokinetics Absorption: After oral administration of diazepam >90% is absorbed, the average time to achieve peak plasma concentrations is 1 to 1.5 hours. Absorption is delayed and decreased when administered with a meal. There is an increase in the mean time to achieve peak concentrations to approximately 2.5 hours in the presence of food. Distribution: Diazepam is highly lipophilic. While there is a moderately quick onset of action, the drug quickly redistributes. Diazepam and its metabolites have high plasma protein binding.(diazepam 98%). Diazepam and metabolites penetrate the blood-brain and placental barriers and are found in breast milk. The volume of distribution is 0.8 to 1.0 L/kg. Metabolism: Diazepam is mostly broken down by the microsomal enzymes CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 enzymes to several active metabolites, mainly desmethyldiazepam. Other minor active metabolites include oxazepam and temazepam. The average half-lives of oral diazepam and desmethyldiazepam are about 46 and 100 hours, respectively. Excretion: The initial distribution is followed by a prolonged terminal elimination(half-life ~ 48 hours). Additionally, the terminal elimination half-life of the active metabolite N-desmethyldiazepam is up to 100 hours. Diazepam and its metabolites are excreted predominantly in the urine. Diazepam accumulates upon multiple dosing; consequently, the terminal elimination half-life of diazepam is slightly prolonged.

What happens if I take 2 5mg diazepam?

Symptoms – The most common symptom of a diazepam overdose is falling into a deep sleep or “coma” while still being able to breathe well enough. Other symptoms may include:

Bluish-colored lips and fingernails Blurred vision, double vision Breathing is slow, labored, or stoppedConfusion Depression Dizziness Drowsiness, lack of alertnessExcitabilityHiccupsRapid side-to-side movement of the eyes Rash Stomach upset Tiredness Tremor Weakness, uncoordinated movement

How much diazepam should I take to sleep?

Diazepam, 10 mg tablets – Drug form Tablets ATC category Neurology. Psychiatry ATC subcategory Anxiolytics Brand name Diazepam Generic name Diazepam Leaflet in Georgian: Diazepam 10 mg tablets Composition Each tablet of Diazepam 10 mg contains: active ingredient: diazepam – 10 mg; excipients: microcrystalline cellulose, lactose monohydrate, ethylcellulose, sodium starch glycolate, magnesium stearate.

Chemical name and CAS number 7-Chloro-1,3-dihydro-1-methyl-5-phenyl-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one; 439-14-5. Pharmacological group and ATC code Benzodiazepine tranquilliser; N05BA01. Pharmacology Diazepam is a long-acting benzodiazepine with anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, sedative, muscle relaxant, and amnestic properties.

The exact sites and mode of action of the benzodiazepines have not been fully elucidated, but the effects of the drugs appear to be mediated through the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The drugs appear to act at the limbic, thalamic, and hypothalamic levels of the CNS, producing anxiolytic, sedative, hypnotic, skeletal muscle relaxant, and anticonvulsant effects.

Benzodiazepines are capable of producing all levels of CNS depression—from mild sedation to hypnosis to coma. Specific binding sites with high affinity for benzodiazepines have been detected in the CNS, and the affinity of these sites for the drugs is enhanced by both GABA and chloride. The sites and actions of benzodiazepines within the CNS appear to involve a macromolecular (oligomer or possibly a tetramer) complex (GABAA-receptor-chloride ionophore complex) that includes GABAA receptors (GABA recognition sites), high-affinity benzodiazepine receptors, and chloride channels, although precise relationships between the sites of action of benzodiazepines and GABA-regulated (-gated) chloride channels remain to be more fully elucidated.

Allosteric interactions of central benzodiazepine receptors with GABAA receptors and subsequent opening of chloride channels appear to be involved in eliciting the CNS effects of the drugs; the benzodiazpine receptors act as modulatory sites on the complex.

Anxiolytic and possibly paradoxical CNS stimulatory effects of benzodiazepines are postulated to result from release of previously suppressed responses (disinhibition). After usual doses of benzodiazepines for several days, the drugs cause a moderate decrease in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. REM rebound does not occur when the drugs are withdrawn.

Stage 3 and 4 sleep are markedly reduced by usual doses of the drugs; the clinical importance of these sleep stage alterations has not been established. Benzodiazepines appear to produce skeletal muscle relaxation predominantly by inhibiting spinal polysynaptic afferent pathways, but the drugs may also inhibit monosynaptic afferent pathways.

The drugs may inhibit monosynaptic and polysynaptic reflexes by acting as inhibitory neuronal transmitters or by blocking excitatory synaptic transmission. The drugs may also directly depress motor nerve and muscle function. Pharmacokinetics Diazepam is readily and completely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, peak plasma concentrations occurring within about 30 to 90 minutes of oral doses.

Diazepam is rapidly absorbed when given as a rectal solution; peak plasma concentrations are achieved after about 10 to 30 minutes. Absorption may be erratic after intramuscular injection and lower peak plasma concentrations may be obtained compared with those after oral doses.

  1. Diazepam is highly lipid soluble and crosses the blood-brain barrier; it acts promptly on the brain, and its initial effects decrease rapidly as it is redistributed into fat depots and tissues.
  2. Diazepam has a biphasic half-life with an initial rapid distribution phase and a prolonged terminal elimination phase of 1 or 2 days; its action is further prolonged by the even longer half-life of 2 to 5 days of its principal active metabolite, desmethyldiazepam (nordazepam).

Diazepam and desmethyldiazepam accumulate on repeated dosage and the relative proportion of desmethyldiazepam in the body increases with long-term use. No simple correlation has been found between plasma concentrations of diazepam or its metabolites and their therapeutic effect.

  • Diazepam is extensively metabolised in the liver, notably via the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP2C19; in addition to desmethyldiazepam, its active metabolites include oxazepam, and temazepam.
  • It is excreted in the urine, mainly in the form of free or conjugated metabolites.
  • Diazepam is 98 to 99% bound to plasma proteins.

The plasma elimination half-life of diazepam and/or its metabolites is prolonged in neonates, in the elderly, and in patients with liver disease. In addition to crossing the blood-brain barrier, diazepam and its metabolites also cross the placental barrier and are distributed into breast milk.

Uses and administration Diazepam is used in the short-term treatment of severe anxiety disorders, as a hypnotic in the short-term management of insomnia, as a sedative and premedicant, as an anticonvulsant (particularly in the management of status epilepticus and febrile convulsions), in the control of muscle spasm, and in the management of withdrawal symptoms.

Adminsitration Diazepam is administered orally with the risk of dependence very much influencing the doseand duration of treatment. Doses should be the lowest that can control symptoms and courses of treatment should be short, not normally exceeding 4 weeks, with diazepam being withdrawn gradually.

  • Elderly and debilitated patients should be given not more than one-half the usual adult dose.
  • Dosage reduction may also be required in patients with hepatic or renal impairment.
  • Diazepam may be given for severe anxiety in oral doses of 2 mg three times daily to a maximum of 30 mg daily.
  • A wider dose range of 4 to 40 mg daily in divided doses is used in the USA with children over 6 months of age receiving up to 10 mg daily.

The benzodiazepines have a limited role in insomnia and diazepam is used for the short-term management of insomnia associated with anxiety. The BNF recommends a dose of 5 to 15 mg by mouth at bedtime. Doses of 1 to 5 mg at bedtime have been used in children and adolescents aged from 12 to 18 years to control night terrors and sleepwalking.

Diazepam may be given for premedication before general anaesthesia or to provide sedative cover for minor surgical or investigative procedures. Doses by mouth are in the range of 5 to 15 mg. The BNFC has suggested giving oral doses to children based on age as follows: 1 month to 1 year, 250 micrograms/kg; 1 to 5 years, 2.5 mg; 5 to 12 years, 5 mg.

Some regard the perioperative use of diazepam in children undesirable since its effect and onset of action are unreliable and paradoxical effects may occur. Diazepam may also be given for sedation during minor surgical and medical procedures; the BNFCsuggests an oral dose may be given to children and adolescents, 45 to 60 minutes beforehand, as follows: 1 month to 12 years, 200 to 300 micrograms/kg (maximum of 5 mg); 12 to 18 years, 100 to 200 micrograms/kg (maximum of 20 mg).

  1. Diazepam may be given by mouth in daily divided doses of 2 to 15 mg to alleviate muscle spasm.
  2. The dose may be increased in severe spastic disorders, such as cerebral palsy, to up to 60 mg daily in adults.
  3. The BNFC suggests initial oral doses in children and adolescents, based on age and given twice daily, as follows: 1 to 12 months, 250 micrograms/kg; 1 to 5 years, 2.5 mg; 5 to 12 years, 5 mg; 12 to 18 years, 10 mg (maximum of 40 mg daily).

Symptoms of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome may be controlled by diazepam given by mouth in a dose of 5 to 20 mg, repeated if required after 2 to 4 hours; another approach is to give 10 mg three or four times on the first day reducing to 5 mg three or four times daily as required.

  1. Overdosage Symptoms The symptoms of diazepam overdose are mainly an intensification of the therapeutic effects (ataxia, drowsiness, dysarthria, sedation, muscle weakness, profound sleep, hypotension, nausea, vomiting,
  2. Impairment of consciousness is fairly rapid in poisoning by benzodiazepines.
  3. Deep coma or other manifestations of severe depression of brainstem vital functions are rare; more common is a sleep-like state from which the patient can be temporarily roused by appropriate stimuli.

There is usually little or no respiratory depression, and cardiac rate and rhythm remain normal in the absence of anoxia or severe hypotension. Since tolerance to benzodiazepines develops rapidly, consciousness is often regained while concentrations of drug in the blood are higher than those which induced coma.

Anxiety and insomnia can occur during recovery from acute overdosage, while a full-blown withdrawal syndrome, possibly with major convulsions, can occur in patients who have previously been chronic users. Treatment Drug should be withdrawed The treatment of benzodiazepine overdosage is generally symptomatic and supportive.

Activated charcoal may be given orally within one hour of ingestion of more than 100 mg of diazepam by adults, or 1 mg/kg by children, provided they are not too drowsy. Gastric lavage is generally not advocated in overdoses of benzodiazepines alone. The specific benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil, is rarely required and can be hazardous, particularly in mixed overdoses involving tricyclic antidepressants or in benzodiazepine-dependent patients; the UK Poisons Information Service, contra-indicates its use in mixed overdoses.

You might be interested:  How Much Do You Lose Selling A House As Is?

Myasthenia gravis, Sleep apnoea, Exacerbated chronic pulmonary insufficiency, Severe hepatic and renal impairment, Hypersensitivity to benzodiazepines or any of the ingredients, Angle-closure glaucoma, Acute alcohol intoxication, Acute intoxication by psychotropic drugs, Pregnancy ( first 3 months)

Adverse effects Drowsiness, sedation, muscle weakness, and ataxia are the most frequent adverse effects of diazepam use. They generally decrease on continued dosage and are a consequence of CNS depression. Less frequent effects include vertigo, headache, confusion, depression, slurred speech or dysarthria, changes in libido, tremor, visual disturbances, urinary retention or incontinence, gastrointestinal disturbances, changes in salivation, and amnesia, hallucinations, insomnia,increased muscle tone, bradicardia, disphagia, nausea, diarrhea, constipation,appetite disturbances,

  • Some patients may experience a paradoxical excitation which may lead to hostility, aggression, and disinhibition.
  • Jaundice, blood disorders, and hypersensitivity reactions have been reported rarely.
  • Respiratory depression and hypotension occasionally occur with high dosage and parenteral use.
  • Pain and thrombophlebitis may occur with some intravenous formulations of diazepam; raised liver enzyme values have occurred.

Overdosage can produce CNS depression and coma or paradoxical excitation. However, fatalities are rare when taken alone. Use of diazepam in the first trimester of pregnancy has occasionally been associated with congenital malformations in the infant but no clear relationship has been established.

  • Use of diazepam in late pregnancy has been associated with intoxication of the neonate.
  • Dependence and Withdrawal The development of dependence is common after regular use of benzodiazepines, even in therapeutic doses for short periods.
  • Dependence is particularly likely in patients with a history of alcohol or drug abuse and in those with marked personality disorders.

Benzodiazepines should therefore be withdrawn by gradual reduction of the dose after regular use for even a few weeks; the time needed for withdrawal can vary from about 4 weeks to a year or more. The extent to which tolerance occurs has been debated but appears to involve psychomotor performance more often than anxiolytic effects.

  1. Drug-seeking behaviour is uncommon with therapeutic doses of benzodiazepines.
  2. Benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome Development of dependence to benzodiazepines cannot be predicted but risk factors include high dosage, regular continuous use, the use of benzodiazepines with a short half-life, use in patients with dependent personality characteristics or a history of drug or alcohol dependence, and the development of tolerance.

The mechanism of dependence is unclear but may involve reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) activity resulting from down-regulation of GABA receptors. Symptoms of benzodiazepine withdrawal include anxiety, depression, impaired concentration, insomnia, headache, dizziness, tinnitus, loss of appetite, tremor, perspiration, irritability, perceptual disturbances such as hypersensitivity to physical, visual, and auditory stimuli and abnormal taste, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, palpitations, mild systolic hypertension, tachycardia, and orthostatic hypotension.

  • Rare and more serious symptoms include muscle twitching, confusional or paranoid psychosis, convulsions, hallucinations, and a state resembling delirium tremens.
  • Broken sleep with vivid dreams and increased REM sleep may persist for some weeks after withdrawal of benzodiazepines.
  • Symptoms typical of withdrawal have occurred despite continued use of benzodiazepines and have been attributed either to the development of tolerance.

Pseudowithdrawal has been reported in patients who believed incorrectly that their dose of benzodiazepine was being reduced. Benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome can theoretically be distinguished from these reactions and from rebound phenomena (return of original symptoms at greater than pretreatment severity) by the differing time course.

A withdrawal syndrome is characterised by its onset, by the development of new symptoms, and by a peak in intensity followed by resolution. Onset of withdrawal symptoms depends on the half-life of the drug and its active metabolites. Symptoms can begin within a few hours after withdrawal of a short-acting benzodiazepine, but may not develop for up to 3 weeks after stopping a longer-acting benzodiazepine.

Resolution of symptoms may take several days or months. With increased awareness of the problems of benzodiazepine dependence, emphasis has been placed on prevention by proper use and careful patient selection. For example, the UK CSM has recommended that benzodiazepines should be reserved for the short-term relief (2 to 4 weeks only) of anxiety that is severe, disabling, or subjecting the individual to unacceptable distress and is occurring alone or in association with insomnia or short-term psychosomatic, organic, or psychotic illness.

Withdrawal from long-term benzodiazepine use should generally be encouraged. Established dependence can be difficult to treat; the patient should have professional and family support and behavioural therapy may be helpful. Withdrawal in a specialist centre may be required for some patients. Since abrupt withdrawal of benzodiazepines may result in severe withdrawal symptoms dosage should be tapered.

The BNF considers that benzodiazepines can be withdrawn in steps of about one-eighth of the daily dose every fortnight (range one-tenth to one-quarter). There are no comparative studies of the efficacy of various withdrawal schedules and in practice the protocol should be titrated against the response of the patient.

  • The daily dosage of diazepam can then be reduced in steps of 0.5 to 2.5 mg at fortnightly intervals.
  • If troublesome abstinence effects occur the dose should be held level for a longer period before further reduction; increased dosage should be avoided if possible.
  • It is better to reduce too slowly than too quickly.

Time required for withdrawal can vary from about 4 weeks to a year or longer. In many cases the rate of withdrawal is best decided by the patient. Adjuvant therapy should generally be avoided. Although a beta blocker may be given for prominent sympathetic overactivity the BNF recommends that this be tried only if other measures fail; antidepressants should be used only for clinical depression or panic attacks.

Antipsychotic drugs should be avoided as they may aggravate symptoms. Symptoms gradually improve after withdrawal but postwithdrawal syndromes lasting for several weeks or months have been described. Continued support may be required for the first year after withdrawal to prevent relapse. Precautions Diazepam should be given with care to elderly or debilitated patients who may be more prone to adverse effects.

Caution is required in patients with muscle weakness, or those with hepatic or renal impairment, who may require reduced doses; The sedative effects of diazepam are most marked during the first few days of use; affected patients should not drive or operate machinery.

  1. Monitoring of cardiorespiratory function is generally recommended when benzodiazepines are used for deep sedation.
  2. Diazepam should be abolished in the development of paradoxical reactions (acute agitation, anxiety, sleep disturbances and hallucinations).
  3. Diazepam long term therapy requires periodic monitoring of peripheral blood.

Diazepam treatment is recommended to start at the end of the workweek. You can use Diazepam at open-angle glaucoma, if patients receive adequate disease therapy. A lower dose is also recommended for patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency due to the risk of respiratory depression.

Diazepam is not appropriate for the treatment of chronic psychosis or for phobic or obsessional states. Diazepam-induced disinhibition may precipitate suicide or aggressive behaviour and it should not, therefore, be used alone to treat depression or anxiety associated with depression; it should also be used with care in patients with personality disorders.

Caution is required in patients with organic brain changes particularly arteriosclerosis. In cases of bereavement, psychological adjustment may be inhibited by diazepam. Some loss of efficacy to the hypnotic effects of benzodiazepines may develop after repeated use for a few weeks.

Dependence characterised by a withdrawal syndrome may develop after regular use of diazepam, even in therapeutic doses for short periods; because of the risk of dependence, diazepam should be used with caution in patients with a history of alcohol or drug addiction. Withdrawal symptoms consist of headaches, muscle pain, extreme anxiety, tension, restlessness, confusion and irritability.

In severe cases the following symptoms may occur: derealisation, depersonalisation, hyperacusis, numbness and tingling of the extremities, hypersensitivity to light, noise and physical contact, hallucinations or epileptic seizures. To prevent it duration of treatment should be as short as possible.

During the period of Diazepam should abstain from alcohol (because of mutual reinforcement inhibitory action on the central nervous system and the possible appearance of pathological intoxication syndrome). Patients with rare hereditary problems of galactose intolerance, (the Lapp lactase deficiency or glucose-galactose malabsorption) should not take this medicine.

Elderly If use of a diazepam is considered necessary in elderly patients, a short-acting drug is to be preferred. It should also be remembered that the elderly are at increased risk of sleep-related breathing disorders, such as sleep apnoea and the use of hypnotics such as diazepam should be avoided in these patients.

  1. Fertility,pregnancy and lactation Breast feeding.
  2. Since benzodiazepines are found in the breast milk, benzodiazepines should not be given to breast feeding mothers.
  3. Animal studies with benzodiazepines have shown minor effects on the foetus while a few studies have reported late behavioural disturbances in offspring exposed in utero.

Do not use during pregnancy, especially during the first and last trimesters, unless there are compelling reasons. If the product is prescribed to a woman of childbearing potential, she should be warned to contact her physician regarding discontinuance of the product if she intends to become or suspects that she is pregnant.

If, for compelling medical reasons, the product is administered during the late phase of pregnancy, or during labour, effects on the neonate, such as hypothermia, hypotonia, irregularities in the foetal heart rate, poor sucking and moderate respiratory depression, can be expected, due to the pharmacological action of the compound.

With newborn infants it must be remembered that the enzyme system involved in the breakdown of the drug is not yet fully developed (especially in premature infants). Moreover, infants born to mothers who took benzodiazepines chronically during the latter stages of pregnancy may have developed physical dependence and may be at some risk for developing withdrawal symptoms in the postnatal period.

Drug interactions Enhanced sedation or respiratory and cardiovascular depression may occur if diazepam is given with other drugs that have CNS-depressant properties; these include alcohol, antidepressants, sedative antihistamines, antipsychotics, general anaesthetics, other hypnotics or sedatives, and opioid analgesics.

The sedative effect of diazepam may also be enhanced by cisapride. Adverse effects may also be produced by use with drugs that interfere with the metabolism of diazepam. Diazepam which is metabolised primarily by hepatic microsomal oxidation may be more susceptible to pharmacokinetic changes than those eliminated primarily by glucuronide conjugation.

Diazepam has the following interactions: Amprenavir – increased risk of prolonged sedation and respiratory depression when diazepam given with amprenavir Esomeprazole – metabolism of diazepam possibly inhibited by esomeprazole (increased plasma concentration) Isoniazid – metabolism of diazepam inhibited by isoniazid Omeprazole – metabolism of diazepam possibly inhibited by omeprazole (increased plasma concentration) Phenytoin – diazepam increases or decreases plasma concentration of phenytoin Rifampicin – metabolism of diazepam accelerated by rifampicin (reduced plasma concentration) Ritonavir – plasma concentration of diazepam possibly increased by ritonavir (risk of extreme sedation and respiratory depression —avoid concomitant use) Valproate – plasma concentration of diazepam possibly increased by valproate Zotepine – diazepam increases plasma concentration of zotepine.

Diazepam belongs to Benzodiazepines and will have the following interactions: Cimetidine – metabolism of benzodiazepines inhibited by cimetidine (increased plasma concentration) Disulfiram – metabolism of benzodiazepines inhibited by disulfiram (increased sedative effects) Fluvoxamine – plasma concentration of some benzodiazepines increased by fluvoxamine Levodopa – benzodiazepines possibly antagonise effects of levodopa Moxonidine – sedative effects possibly increased when benzodiazepines given with moxonidine Olanzapine – increased risk of hypotension, bradycardia and respiratory depression when parenteral benzodiazepines given with intramuscular olanzapine Phenytoin – benzodiazepines possibly increase or decrease plasma concentration of phenytoin Rifampicin – metabolism of benzodiazepines possibly accelerated by rifampicin (reduced plasma concentration) Sodium Oxybate – benzodiazepines enhance effects of sodium oxybate (avoid concomitant use) Theophylline – effects of benzodiazepines possibly reduced by theophylline.

Diazepam belongs to Anxiolytics and Hypnotics and will have the following interactions: ACE Inhibitors – enhanced hypotensive effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with ACE inhibitors Adrenergic Neurone Blockers – enhanced hypotensive effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with adrenergic neurone blockers Alcohol – increased sedative effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with alcohol Alpha-blockers – enhanced hypotensive and sedative effects when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with alpha-blockers Anaesthetics, General – increased sedative effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with general anaesthetics Angiotensin-II Receptor Antagonists – enhanced hypotensive effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with angiotensin-II receptor antagonists Antidepressants, Tricyclic – increased sedative effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with tricyclics Antidepressants, Tricyclic (related) – increased sedative effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with tricyclic-related antidepressants Antihistamines – increased sedative effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with antihistamines Antipsychotics – increased sedative effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with antipsychotics Baclofen – increased sedative effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with baclofen Beta-blockers – enhanced hypotensive effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with beta-blockers Calcium-channel Blockers – enhanced hypotensive effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with calcium-channel blockers Clonidine – enhanced hypotensive effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with clonidine Diazoxide – enhanced hypotensive effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with diazoxide Diuretics – enhanced hypotensive effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with diuretics Hydralazine – enhanced hypotensive effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with hydralazine Lofexidine – increased sedative effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with lofexidine Methyldopa – enhanced hypotensive effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with methyldopa Minoxidil – enhanced hypotensive effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with minoxidil Mirtazapine – increased sedative effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with mirtazapine Moxonidine – enhanced hypotensive effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with moxonidine Nabilone – increased sedative effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with nabilone Nitrates – enhanced hypotensive effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with nitrates Opioid Analgesics – increased sedative effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with opioid analgesics Ritonavir – plasma concentration of anxiolytics and hypnotics possibly increased by ritonavir Sodium Nitroprusside – enhanced hypotensive effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with sodium nitroprusside Tizanidine – increased sedative effect when anxiolytics and hypnotics given with tizanidine.

Identification White scored cylindrical tablets. Presentation 1 blister packets with 24 tablets in the cardboard box. Expiry date 3 years. Do not use after the expiration date. Storage conditions Store at a room temperature (15-25 0 C), in a dry place, out of the reach of children.

Is diazepam as good as Xanax?

The Problem With Benzodiazepine Conversion Tables – Another difference between benzodiazepines is that they work for different amounts of time in the body. Even though 1 mg of Xanax is equivalent to 20 mg of Valium, Xanax only lasts six hours while Valium lasts 12 hours.

Can diazepam cause depression?

Drug information provided by: Merative, Micromedex ® It is very important that your doctor check your or your child’s progress at regular visits to make sure this medicine is working properly. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant.

Using this medicine during the later part of a pregnancy may cause problems in your newborn baby (eg, sedation or withdrawal symptoms). Tell your doctor right away if your baby has an abnormal sleep pattern, diarrhea, feeding problems, a high-pitched cry, irritability, low muscle tone, restlessness, shakiness or tremors, sluggishness, trouble breathing, weight loss, vomiting, or fails to gain weight.

If you think you have become pregnant while using the medicine, tell your doctor right away. This medicine may cause respiratory depression, a serious breathing problem that can be life-threatening, when used together with narcotic pain medicines. Check with your doctor right away if you have pale or blue lips, fingernails, or skin, difficult or trouble breathing, or irregular, fast or slow, or shallow breathing.

This medicine may make you drowsy, confused, or less alert than you are normally. Do not drive or do anything else that could be dangerous until you know how this medicine affects you. This medicine may cause some people to be agitated, irritable, or display other abnormal behaviors. It may also cause some people to have suicidal thoughts and tendencies or to become more depressed.

Also tell your doctor if you have sudden or strong feelings, including feeling nervous, angry, restless, violent, or scared. If you or your caregiver notice any of these side effects, tell your doctor right away. Check with your doctor right away if blurred vision, difficulty with reading, or any other change in vision occurs during or after treatment.

  1. Your doctor may want your eyes be checked by an ophthalmologist (eye doctor).
  2. Check with your doctor before using this medicine with alcohol or medicines that can affect the central nervous system (CNS).
  3. The use of alcohol or other medicines that affect the CNS with diazepam may worsen the side effects of this medicine, such as dizziness, poor concentration, drowsiness, unusual dreams, and trouble with sleeping.

Some examples of medicines that affect the CNS are antihistamines or medicine for allergies or colds, sedatives, tranquilizers, or sleeping medicines, medicine for depression, medicine for anxiety, prescription pain medicine or narcotics, medicine for attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, medicine for seizures or barbiturates, muscle relaxants, or anesthetics, including some dental anesthetics.

This medicine may be habit-forming. If you feel that the medicine is not working as well, do not use more than your prescribed dose. Call your doctor for instructions. Symptoms of an overdose include: change or loss of consciousness, confusion, dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position, irregular, fast or slow, or shallow breathing, lack of coordination, loss of strength or energy, muscle pain or weakness, pale or blue lips, fingernails, or skin, shakiness and unsteady walk, unsteadiness, trembling, or other problems with muscle control or coordination, sweating, trouble breathing, unusual drowsiness, dullness, tiredness, weakness or feeling of sluggishness, or unusual weak feeling.

Call your doctor right away if you notice these symptoms. Do not change your dose or suddenly stop using this medicine without first checking with your doctor. Your doctor may want you to gradually reduce the amount you are using before stopping it completely.

You might be interested:  How Long Do Hermit Crabs Live?

This may help prevent a possible worsening of your seizures and reduce the possibility of withdrawal symptoms including burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, “pins and needles”, or tingling feelings, continuing ringing or buzzing or other unexplained noise in the ears, discouragement, false feeling of insects crawling on the skin, feeling sad or empty, hearing loss, irritability, lack of appetite, loss of interest or pleasure, trouble concentrating, or trouble sleeping.

This medicine contains benzyl alcohol which may cause serious reactions to newborn, premature, or low-birthweight infants. Discuss this with your doctor if you are concerned. Call your doctor right away:

If your seizures still continue after using this medicine. If your seizures are different from your previous episodes. If you are alarmed by the number or severity of your seizure episodes. If you are alarmed by the color or breathing of the patient.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter ) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements. Portions of this document last updated: July 01, 2023 Copyright: © Merative US L.P.1973, 2023.

Is diazepam a good drug?

Side Effects – See also Warning section. Drowsiness, dizziness, tiredness, blurred vision, or unsteadiness may occur. If any of these effects last or get worse, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly. Remember that this medication has been prescribed because your doctor has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects.

Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects. Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: mental/mood changes (such as memory problems, agitation, hallucinations, confusion, restlessness, depression ), trouble speaking, trouble walking, muscle weakness, shaking (tremors), trouble urinating, yellowing eyes / skin, signs of infection (such as sore throat that doesn’t go away, fever, chills).

Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: slow/shallow breathing. A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching /swelling (especially of the face/ tongue /throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing,

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. In the US – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch. In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

How long before a flight should I take diazepam?

Quick question re diazepam to calm nerves when flying.); $dispatch(‘mobile-search-menu-opened’) }, closeMobileSearch() } x-show=open x-on:open-mobile-search.window=openMobileSearch() x-cloak=> Please or to access all these features Top Bottom bookworm1982 · 18/06/2022 14:08 Hi all, I’m have a four hour flight to Greece tomorrow, and I absolutely loathe flying. My doctor has prescribed me with six diazepam 2mg tablets – three for way there and three for way back. She says I should take two, third is for backup. Anyway, one thing I forgot to ask the doctor is how soon before I fly should I take the first one for it to take full effect?? As soon as I board? Do they work immediately? They need to be working their magic for when we take off 🤪 I can’t get back in touch with doc to ask. Any help much appreciated!! And any tips on how to handle my fear of flying also much appreciated xxx OP posts: Whatifthisisit · 18/06/2022 14:12 I find 40 minutes before takeoff optimum time. Whatifthisisit · 18/06/2022 14:14 And don’t worry about the flight. You will be relaxed at takeoff and by the time you land pretty much back to normal. user1477249785 · 18/06/2022 14:15 When I used to take them, I did it as they called boarding. Whataplanker · 18/06/2022 14:27 About 30 mins does the job for me. shinynewapple22 · 18/06/2022 14:31 I normally take just before we walk down to the Gate. I used to take a higher dose and also take a couple before we traveled to the airport- but one good thing of being able to manage my anxiety on flights by taking the diazepam is that I am no longer so nervous and recently have got by on just the one tablet before take off, Isaidnoalready · 18/06/2022 14:33 I couldn’t walk straight after two of them three would coma me 🤣 About 30/40 minutes prior is ideal and you might get a dry cotton mouth so ask for water FlibbertyGibbitt · 18/06/2022 14:34 Half an hour, I used to take them just as I sat on the plane, Still felt nervous but took the edge off, you might be able to snooze as well. Saying this I can’t snooze as I’m helping the pilot fly the plane ! JaneJeffer · 18/06/2022 14:42 FlibbertyGibbitt · 18/06/2022 14:34 Half an hour, I used to take them just as I sat on the plane, Still felt nervous but took the edge off, you might be able to snooze as well. Saying this I can’t snooze as I’m helping the pilot fly the plane ! bookworm1982 · 18/06/2022 20:29 FlibbertyGibbitt · 18/06/2022 14:34 Half an hour, I used to take them just as I sat on the plane, Still felt nervous but took the edge off, you might be able to snooze as well. Saying this I can’t snooze as I’m helping the pilot fly the plane ! OP posts: bookworm1982 · 18/06/2022 20:29 Thanks everyone. Half an hour before it is then!! Xxx OP posts: BackToTheTop · 18/06/2022 20:38 Yes another one for half an hour before take off, I’d take on 2mg tablet, have a vodka and tonic on the plane and I’d usually fall asleep or be chilled out user1477249785 · 18/06/2022 21:39 FlibbertyGibbitt · 18/06/2022 14:34 Half an hour, I used to take them just as I sat on the plane, Still felt nervous but took the edge off, you might be able to snooze as well. Saying this I can’t snooze as I’m helping the pilot fly the plane ! Ha ha. You’ve frightened people but I know exactly what you mean! Sitting in your seat in row 32, analysing every noise and wondering why the pilot has started the descent already and if he’s realised there’s a flappy thing on the window. I do this too. FlibbertyGibbitt · 18/06/2022 21:41 user1477249785 · 18/06/2022 21:39 Ha ha. You’ve frightened people but I know exactly what you mean! Sitting in your seat in row 32, analysing every noise and wondering why the pilot has started the descent already and if he’s realised there’s a flappy thing on the window. I do this too. FlibbertyGibbitt · 18/06/2022 14:34 Half an hour, I used to take them just as I sat on the plane, Still felt nervous but took the edge off, you might be able to snooze as well. Saying this I can’t snooze as I’m helping the pilot fly the plane ! This I don’t actually fly the plane as I’m not a pilot however I’m there in spirit in the cockpit 🤪 BattenburgDonkey · 18/06/2022 21:42 Sorry to jump on, but can you take these if you have kids with you? Terrified of flying but want to take the kids on holiday, DH would be there too but I don’t want to scare the kids if they make me act daft 😅 Moonshine86 · 18/06/2022 21:43 Half hour before under your tongue. BuffaloCauliflower · 18/06/2022 21:47 If you’re not used to them you may need only one, definitely see how you feel before taking the other. They’ll last a good couple of hours. Don’t take it before you get on the plane. Be very wary about having any alcohol on top. SiobhanSharpe · 18/06/2022 21:51 I usually take one about 15 minutes before I even get to the airport as the whole experience – check-in, security and passport control are in the ninth circle of hell. i hate crowds and queuing as well as the actual flight. I pay extra to go through fast track security as I’m afraid of having a panic attack if I’m in a snaking queue and can’t see any way out. I pay extra to use an airport lounge as thrykre an oasis of peace and calm compared with the departure ‘lounge’ area. Last time I flew, pre-covid now, there were no seats available at all in the departure lounge, It was incredibly crowded. SiobhanSharpe · 18/06/2022 21:57 posted too soon. So by the time I get on the plane I’m already calm. I find one tablet will last 3-4 hours (5mg). Two would knock me out but i’d take another after that if i was flying long haul. They also helped me cope with the Channel tunnel, I don’t need to take them for that any more. SiobhanSharpe · 18/06/2022 22:03 BattenburgDonkey · 18/06/2022 21:42 Sorry to jump on, but can you take these if you have kids with you? Terrified of flying but want to take the kids on holiday, DH would be there too but I don’t want to scare the kids if they make me act daft 😅 I can’t speak for anyone else but they definitely don’t make me act daft, I’m just a bit zoned out – sort of one step removed from reality and a bit cocooned from the chaos of the airport, the nerves and the fear on the plane. I don’t drink alcohol with it. BackToTheTop · 18/06/2022 22:04 BattenburgDonkey · 18/06/2022 21:42 Sorry to jump on, but can you take these if you have kids with you? Terrified of flying but want to take the kids on holiday, DH would be there too but I don’t want to scare the kids if they make me act daft 😅 I take them when giving presentations at work for stage fright. I take 2mg, and can then do a full on, presentation in front of loads of people, I can answer questions and I’m sharp and not knocked out or slow at all, so You’ll be fine looking after kids. They just take the edge off my anxiety and bring it to a normal level. mnnewbie111 · 18/06/2022 22:05 FlibbertyGibbitt · 18/06/2022 14:34 Half an hour, I used to take them just as I sat on the plane, Still felt nervous but took the edge off, you might be able to snooze as well. Saying this I can’t snooze as I’m helping the pilot fly the plane ! Squiff70 · 18/06/2022 22:50 2mg is a very low dose, as is 4mg (if you take two of the 2mg). Take them half an hour before departure, so as they are about to start loading you onto the plane. It’s extremely unlikely you’ll be actually drowsy but it’s possible if it’s your first time taking them. They will just take the edge off your anxiety. bookworm1982 · 07/07/2022 15:57 Thanks for all the help everyone. flight went well, but I think it helped that there was very little turbulence 👍🏻 I even relaxed enough to have a cup of tea and a Kit Kat! Please create an account To comment on this thread you need to create a Mumsnet account. Math.max( 25, Math.floor( 0.15 * (type === ‘x’ ? window.innerWidth || document.body.clientWidth : window.innerHeight || document.body.clientHeight) ) ), // Minimum velocity the gesture must be moving when the gesture ends to be // considered a swipe. velocityThreshold: 5, // Used to calculate the distance threshold to ignore the gestures velocity // and always consider it a swipe. disregardVelocityThreshold: (type, self) => Math.floor(0.5 * (type === ‘x’ ? self.element.clientWidth : self.element.clientHeight)), // Point at which the pointer moved too much to consider it a tap or longpress // gesture. pressThreshold: 8, // If true, swiping in a diagonal direction will fire both a horizontal and a // vertical swipe. // If false, whichever direction the pointer moved more will be the only swipe // fired. diagonalSwipes: false, // The degree limit to consider a swipe when diagonalSwipes is true. diagonalLimit: Math.tan(((45 * 1.5) / 180) * Math.PI), // Listen to mouse events in addition to touch events. (For desktop support.) mouseSupport: true, } const gesture = new TinyGesture($refs.modal, options); gesture.on(‘swipeleft’, () => ); gesture.on(‘swiperight’, () => ); } } x-on:keydown.left=$dispatch(‘modal-navigate-left’) x-on:keydown.right=$dispatch(‘modal-navigate-right’) x-on:keydown.esc=$dispatch(‘modal-esc’) x-init=handleSwipe() x-ref=modal> ) ; > : Quick question re diazepam to calm nerves when flying.

What is the duration of action of benzodiazepines?

Pharmacology – Benzodiazepines are a group of CNS depressants which induce feelings of calm (anxiolysis), drowsiness and sleep. They act by facilitating the binding of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA at various GABA receptors throughout the CNS. Because they have a lower tendency to cause a potentially fatal CNS depression compared to earlier drugs such as barbiturates, benzodiazepines are widely used in medicine for the treatment of anxiety (anxiolytics) and insomnia (sedative/hypnotics), as well as other psychological conditions such as panic attacks and panic disorders.

  1. There is no clear division between anxiolytics and hypnotics, since most anxiolytics will induce sleep if taken at night and most hypnotics will sedate when taken during the day.
  2. Different benzodiazepines vary in the rate in which they are metabolised to pharmacologically active forms and particularly in their half-lives (see Table 1): short-acting drugs have a half-life of less than 24 hours e.g.

midazolam; intermediate-acting compounds such as nitrazepam have half-lives greater than 24 hours, whereas long-acting compounds such as diazepam have half-lives greater than 48 hours. Such half-lives vary between individuals, and the elderly tend to eliminate these drugs much more slowly.

They are thus more at risk from the side-effects which include drowsiness, ataxia (staggering gait), mental confusion, impaired judgement and anterograde amnesia, There is a significantly increased risk of adverse events in the elderly such as falls, diminished cognitive function and driving impairment, although the latter is not confined to the elderly.

The European prevalence studies show that, excluding alcohol, benzodiazepines are along with cannabis the psychoactive substances most prevalent in the driving population. Experimental studies show that these drugs impair driving ability and when alcohol is also used, the risk of being involved in or responsible for a road accident is significantly increased.

  • Benzodiazepine intoxication can be associated with behavioural disinhibition, potentially resulting in hostile or aggressive behaviour.
  • The effect is perhaps most common when benzodiazepines are taken in combination with alcohol.
  • The combined use of alcohol and benzodiazepines also increases the risk of a fatal overdose because both act as CNS depressants.

A similar fatal interaction can occur when opiates are taken with benzodiazepines as part of a pattern of polydrug use. A significant number of problem drug users swallow, ‘snort’ or inject high doses of benzodiazepines to enhance the euphoriant effects of opiates or to minimise unpleasant effects of psychostimulants.

  • The EMCDDA’s Annual report on the state of the drugs problem in Europe highlights the fact that concomitant use of benzodiazepines and opiates is a major risk factor in drug-related deaths.
  • Apart from the increased risk of fatal overdoses, the usual injection-specific diseases such as tissue damage, gangrene and transmission of HIV and hepatitis C also occur if the drugs are injected.

There is also the risk of cross-dependence developing to benzodiazepines. Medically, benzodiazepines should only be used for the short-term relief of anxiety or insomnia which is severe and disabling. This is because tolerance and dependence can occur just weeks after use has commenced.

Is diazepam a muscle relaxer?

Descriptions – Diazepam is used to relieve symptoms of anxiety and alcohol withdrawal. This medicine may also be used to treat certain seizure disorders and help relax muscles or relieve muscle spasm. Diazepam is a benzodiazepine. Benzodiazepines belong to the group of medicines called central nervous system (CNS) depressants, which are medicines that slow down the nervous system.

  • Tablet
  • Solution