How long do night sweats last?

Menopause-related hot flashes and night sweats can last for years – Harvard Health How long do hot flashes last? It used to be said that menopause-related hot flashes fade away after six to 24 months. But for many women, hot flashes and night sweats often last a lot longer—by some estimates seven to 11 years. The hormonal roller coaster that comes as a woman’s childbearing years wind down can trigger a range of hot flash symptoms.

As many as 80% of women going through menopause experience hot flashes. Hot flashes, also known as vasomotor symptoms, are often described as a sudden sensation of heat in the chest, face, and head followed by flushing, perspiration, and sometimes chills. Hot flashes and sweats that occur during sleep can make it hard to get a good night’s rest.

The estimates of the duration of these symptoms come from the, a long-term study of women of different races and ethnicities who are in the menopausal transition. “The data from this study confirm what many women already know firsthand. Hot flashes can go on for years and take a toll on a woman’s health and well-being,” says Dr.

  • JoAnn Manson, professor of women’s health at Harvard Medical School and professor of epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health.
  • The SWAN researchers found that some women are more likely to deal with long-term hot flashes than others.
  • Women who had their first hot flashes before their menstrual periods ended had hot flashes for an average of nine to 10 years.

When hot flashes didn’t start until after the last menstrual period, the average duration was only about three and a half years. But even on the short end of the spectrum, that’s a long time to deal with hot flashes and night sweats. Women in the SWAN study who experienced hot flashes for a longer time tended to be current or former smokers, overweight, stressed, depressed, or anxious.

  1. Ethnicity also played a role.
  2. African American women reported the longest duration of hot flashes (averaging more than 11 years), while Japanese and Chinese women had hot flashes for about half that time.
  3. The “reality check” the SWAN study provides on hot flashes should encourage women to seek solutions.

If hot flashes and night sweats are really bothering you, don’t put up with them. Talk with your doctor about treatment options. The most effective hot flashes treatment is estrogen-based hormone therapy, though it comes with several downsides. While hormone therapy is very effective at relieving hot flashes, women at older ages have higher risks of stroke, blood clots, and other health problems.

“So, it’s important that women explore a full range of treatment options — especially women likely to have persistent hot flashes,” advises Dr. Manson. Several non-hormonal medications can also help relieve hot flashes and night sweats. These include some types of antidepressants, some drugs commonly prescribed for nerve pain, and some high blood pressure medications.

As with any medication, it’s best to opt for the lowest dose that effectively relieves your symptoms, and to take it for the shortest amount of time possible. For some women, non-medication measures can help. These include deep-breathing exercises when a hot flash starts; dressing in layers; lowering the thermostat; staying away from caffeine, alcohol, hot beverages, and spicy foods; stress reduction techniques like meditation and mindfulness; and doing your best to stay cool in general.

Why do viruses cause night sweats?

Causes of Night Sweats are episodes of excessive perspiration that begin while a person is sleeping. Sweating is an important bodily function, helping to regulate body temperature, balance electrolytes, and keep the skin hydrated. But night sweats can be bothersome and uncomfortable.

  • Not all is the same as having night sweats.
  • Heavier sweating may be caused by a hot room or too much bedding, while night sweats can be caused by medication or a health condition.
  • Learning about the potential causes of night sweats and tips for coping with nighttime perspiration may help bring relief and more comfortable sleep.

There are many potential causes of night sweats, including certain medications, changes in hormone production, and medical conditions. Most people with night sweats do not have National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information.

  1. A serious disease.
  2. When the body’s internal temperature increases, glands in the skin produce sweat National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information.
  3. In response.
  4. As sweat on the skin evaporates, it decreases the body’s temperature.

Sweat is released in hot environments and during physical activity. Sweat can also be released when the body’s temperature rises in response to stress, fear, or anxiety. Hyperhidrosis is the medical term used to describe sweating that exceeds what is needed to manage the body’s temperature.

When hyperhidrosis occurs during sleep, it is referred to as night sweats. Night sweats vary in severity from a light perspiration that may be unnoticable upon waking to a drenching sweat that soaks clothes and bedding. There are a wide range of conditions associated with night sweats. Night sweats don’t always have an underlying cause, but they can be triggered by fevers, changes in hormone levels, or other conditions.

Nearly any type of fever can lead to excessive sweating. Fever is when the body’s temperature is elevated by more than,5 degrees National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information.

  • Bacterial infections
  • Viral infections, including
  • Fungal infections
  • Parasitic infections, such as malaria and some tick-borne illnesses

Hyperthyroidism, also called an overactive thyroid, is a condition in which excessive thyroid hormone is made by the thyroid gland. Hyperthyroidism increases a person’s metabolism, which can cause the body’s temperature to go up and trigger excess sweating,

  1. Can cause night sweats.
  2. In people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, sweating can be triggered by low blood sugar National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) NIDDK research creates knowledge about and treatments for diseases that are among the most chronic, costly, and consequential for patients, their families, and the Nation.

, which activates the nervous system and causes symptoms like increased perspiration. A person with diabetes may also sweat after taking insulin or other drugs to manage blood sugar levels. Nerve damage as a result of diabetes is another potential cause of night sweats.

There are several types of nerve damage that can occur in people with diabetes, one of which is called autonomic neuropathy National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) NIDDK research creates knowledge about and treatments for diseases that are among the most chronic, costly, and consequential for patients, their families, and the Nation.

Autonomic neuropathy describes nerve damage affecting internal organs, including parts of the digestive system, eyes, and even the sweat glands. Damage to these nerves can cause increased perspiration at night. The endocrine system includes several glands in the body that release hormones.

Night sweats can be a symptom of many conditions that affect endocrine function. For instance, some tumors can cause changes in hormone levels. In addition, overproduction of growth hormone Medline Plus MedlinePlus is an online health information resource for patients and their families and friends. by the pituitary gland, known as acromegaly, can cause night sweats.

Some types of can trigger night sweats. Lymphoma, kidney cancer, and prostate cancer are examples of kinds of cancer that may cause a person to experience excess sweating. Night sweats can occur as a result of several conditions that affect the nervous system.

  1. The nervous system is composed of nerves originating in the brain and spinal cord that extend into the rest of the body.
  2. Neurological conditions like stroke,, and injuries of the spinal cord can cause night sweats.
  3. Excessive perspiration can also be a symptom of nerve damage or an overreaction of the nervous system Medline Plus MedlinePlus is an online health information resource for patients and their families and friends.

to normal stimulation. Night sweats are common in people with sleep disorders, though researchers are not sure if sleep disorders themselves cause night sweats. For instance, as many as a third of people with experience regular night sweats. OSA involves frequent interruptions in breathing during sleep, and the resulting drops in blood oxygen levels National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information.

  • Antidepressants: Antidepressants are often linked to night sweats. Nearly all types of antidepressants have been associated with increased sweating, which usually begins within a few weeks of starting a new antidepressant drug.
  • Methadone: Methadone, as well as several other prescription and illicit opioids, can cause a general increase in sweating.
  • Hormonal medications: Medications that affects certain sex hormones, like estrogen and testosterone, may cause hot flashes and an overall increase sweating.

Other drugs associated with increased sweating include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, beta blockers, antihistamines, and cough suppressants. If you are concerned that a prescribed medication may be causing your night sweats, please be sure to speak with a doctor before stopping the drug or changing your dose. and people assigned female at birth can be caused by hormonal changes during menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause. Nighttime sweating can be a result of hot flashes. Hot flashes are common in people with, a set of symptoms that occur in around 90% of women Office on Women’s Health (OWH) OWH coordinates women’s health efforts across HHS and addresses critical women’s health issues by informing and advancing policies, educating health care professionals and consumers, and supporting innovative programs.

  1. And people assigned female at birth.
  2. PMS happens in the days or weeks before a menstrual period.
  3. Although the exact cause of PMS is unknown, researchers suspect that symptoms are triggered by changes in hormone levels.
  4. Hot flashes and night sweats can also be a sign of a severe form of PMS Office on Women’s Health (OWH) OWH coordinates women’s health efforts across HHS and addresses critical women’s health issues by informing and advancing policies, educating health care professionals and consumers, and supporting innovative programs.

called premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Hot flashes and night sweats may develop during pregnancy or after giving birth. These hot flashes are believed to be linked to the hormonal fluctuations that occur during and after pregnancy. One study found that more than 30% of pregnant people National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information.

  1. Experience hot flashes, which often reach their height during the third trimester.
  2. Around 25% of people continued to experience postpartum hot flashes that generally began to resolve after about two weeks.
  3. Menopause describes the point one year after a person stops having menstrual periods National Institutes on Aging (NIA) NIA leads a broad scientific effort to understand the nature of aging and to extend the healthy, active years of life.

Symptoms such as changing periods, sleep difficulties, hot flashes, and night sweats commonly begin several years before a person’s final menstrual period, a time called perimenopause. Hot flashes occur in up to 80% of people going through menopause. Researchers believe that hot flashes are a symptom of withdrawal from premenopausal levels of estrogens in the body.

  1. As a result of this withdrawal, the body initiates sweating at a lower temperature than it did before.
  2. And people assigned male at birth may be caused by low levels of testosterone.
  3. Testosterone is a sex hormone that is mostly produced in the testicles in men and people assigned male at birth.
  4. Testosterone has many functions in the body, including fueling the development of muscles and bones National Institutes of Health (NIH) The NIH, a part of the U.S.

Department of Health and Human Services, is the nation’s medical research agency — making important discoveries that improve health and save lives. and maintaining the production of red blood cells and sperm cells. Without enough testosterone in the body, a person may experience symptoms like reduced sex drive and depression.

  • While there are a range of medicines and health conditions that can cause night sweats, most people who sweat excessively at night do not have a serious underlying health condition.
  • In many cases, sweating at night is caused by keeping a bedroom above, wearing too many layers of clothing to bed, being covered with excessive bedding, or regularly using tobacco,, or,
  • Anyone concerned about nighttime sweating should talk to their doctor. People should pay particular attention to symptoms that may signal an underlying health condition, including:
  • Drenching night sweats that require changing bedding
  • Night sweats occurring nightly or on a regular basis
  • Sweats that have a noticeable hue or color
  • Excess sweating that occurs along with other health issues, such as fever, unexpected weight loss, or exposure to COVID-19

While night sweats cannot always be prevented, several steps may be helpful to reduce their frequency and impact.

  • Talk to a doctor: The only way to learn the cause of night sweats is to talk to a doctor. A doctor can assess specific symptoms, suggest diagnostic testing, and provide treatment when appropriate.
  • Review medications: Because several medications are linked to night sweats, consulting with a doctor can help identify any medications that could be increasing sweating. The doctor may be able to change the dose or find a new medication without this side effect.
  • Wear baggy bedclothes: Many causes of night sweats are linked to an increase in body temperature. To reduce sweating, wear baggy, breathable clothing to bed.
  • Improve airflow in the bedroom: Airflow can help sweat evaporate and cool down the body during sleep. Try opening doors and windows or using fans to enhance airflow in the bedroom.
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a form of talk therapy that has been found to help decrease the symptoms of menopause National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information. and reduce hot flashes in people taking hormone therapy for prostate cancer.
  • Find support: While emotional support cannot cure night sweats, it can help those experiencing the challenges caused by this symptom. Excessive sweating can affect sleep and other elements of day-to-day life, so consider talking to a counselor or other mental health professional for support.

For people in perimenopause, there are several additional tips that may be helpful for coping with night sweats and other menopausal symptoms.

  • Ask about medicines: Although many people in perimenopause do not require treatment Office on Women’s Health (OWH) OWH coordinates women’s health efforts across HHS and addresses critical women’s health issues by informing and advancing policies, educating health care professionals and consumers, and supporting innovative programs., those hoping to reduce hot flashes, night sweats, and other symptoms may find it beneficial to discuss hormone replacement therapy Office on Women’s Health (OWH) OWH coordinates women’s health efforts across HHS and addresses critical women’s health issues by informing and advancing policies, educating health care professionals and consumers, and supporting innovative programs. and other medical treatments with their doctor.
  • Avoid triggers: Certain triggers can exacerbate menopausal symptoms National Institutes on Aging (NIA) NIA leads a broad scientific effort to understand the nature of aging and to extend the healthy, active years of life., Staying away from things like spicy food, alcohol, coffee, and other sources of caffeine may be helpful.
  • Try mind and body methods: Several mind-body practices have been found to help reduce the symptoms of menopause, including, tai chi, acupuncture, and,
  1. Smetana, G.W. (2021, September 22). Evaluation of the patient with night sweats or generalized hyperhidrosis. In M.D. Aronson (Ed.). UpToDate., Retrieved October 23, 2022, from
  2. Bryce, C. (2020). Persistent night sweats: Diagnostic evaluation. American Family Physician, 102(7), 427–433.
  3. Hodge, B.D., Sanvictores, T., & Brodell, R.T. (2022, October 10). Anatomy, skin sweat glands. In StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing., Retrieved October 23, from
  4. Balli, S., Shumway, K.R., & Sharan, S. (2022, September 11). Physiology, fever. In StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing., Retrieved October 23, from
  5. Ross, D.S. (2022, February 15). Overview of the clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism in adults. In D.S. Cooper (Ed.). UpToDate., Retrieved October 23, 2022, from
  6. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease. (2021, July). Low blood glucose (Hypoglycemia)., Retrieved October 23, 2022, from
  7. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease. (2018, February). Autonomic neuropathy., Retrieved October 23, 2022, from
  8. A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia. (2021, May 13). Acromegaly. MedlinePlus., Retrieved October 23, 2022, from
  9. A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia. (2020, June 23). Autonomic dysreflexia. MedlinePlus., Retrieved October 23, 2022, from
  10. Nigro, C.A., Bledel, I., & Borsini, E. (2022). Independent association between hypoxemia and night sweats in obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep & Breathing.
  11. Schwartz, R.A., Altman, R., & Kihiczak, G. (2021, Mach 23). Hyperhidrosis. Medscape., Retrieved October 23, 2022, from
  12. Office on Women’s Health. (2021, February 22). Premenstrual syndrome (PMS).U.S. Department of Health and Human Services., Retrieved October 23, 2002, from
  13. Office on Women’s Health. (2021, February 22). Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).U.S. Department of Health and Human Services., Retrieved October 23, 2002, from
  14. Thurston, R.C., Luther, J.F., Wisniewski, S.R., Eng, H., & Wisner, K.L. (2013). Prospective evaluation of nighttime hot flashes during pregnancy and postpartum. Fertility and Sterility, 100(6), 1667–1672.
  15. National Institute on Aging. (2021, September 30). What is menopause?, Retrieved October 23, 2022, from
  16. Santen, R.J., Loprinzi, C.L., & Casper, R.F. (2020, April 27). Menopausal hot flashes. In R.L. Barbieri & W.F. Crawley Jr. (Eds.). UpToDate., Retrieved October 23, 2022, from
  17. Wein, H. (2013, September 23). Understanding how testosterone affects men. National Institutes of Health: NIH Research Matters., Retrieved October 23, 2022, from
  18. Snyder, P.J. (2022, May 5). Clinical features and diagnosis of male hypogonadism. In A.M. Matsumoto (Ed.). UpToDate., Retrieved October 23, 2022, from
  19. Miller, J.L. (2022, February 11). Chromhidrosis. In C. Owen (Ed.). UpToDate., Retrieved October 23, 2022, from
  20. Hunter M.S. (2021). Cognitive behavioral therapy for menopausal symptoms. Climacteric, 24(1), 51–56.
  21. Office on Women’s Health. (2021, February 22). Menopause treatment.U.S. Department of Health and Human Services., Retrieved October 23, 2002, from
  22. Office on Women’s Health. (2021, February 22). Menopause symptoms and relief.U.S. Department of Health and Human Services., Retrieved October 23, 2002, from
  23. National Institute on Aging. (2021, September 30). Hot flashes: What can I do?, Retrieved October 23, 2022, from
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: Causes of Night Sweats

Is sweating an Omicron symptom?

Fatigue and Physical Exhaustion – Physical tiredness and fatigue are key symptoms of COVID-19. They are also symptoms of Omicron. To distinguish these symptoms, our experts identify if there is extreme fatigue that is accompanied by mental fog or brain fog,

  • Severe headaches are one of the first symptoms of Omicron, even more common than coughing, fever, and tiredness.
  • However, headaches can be a symptom of many other diseases.
  • Fortunately, experts have identified signs to differentiate an Omicron headache: It is a moderate to intense pain with a sensation of pressure or stabbing.

The location of the pain is on both sides of the head and usually lasts more than three days. Mucus and a runny nose are universal symptoms of the cold, flu, and COVID-19. They are also symptoms of Omicron. These symptoms last approximately two to five days after detection of the virus.

When should I be worried about night sweats?

When should I see my doctor? – You should see your doctor if you’re having night sweats when it’s not hot — especially if you notice other symptoms such as:

unexplained weight loss fever pain in a specific area cough diarrhoea

Your doctor may refer you for tests to rule out a serious cause of your symptoms. FIND A HEALTH SERVICE — The Service Finder can help you find doctors, pharmacies, hospitals and other health services.

Do night sweats mean your body is healing?

6. Infections – Occasionally, your body produces night sweats because it’s trying to heal itself. When you develop an infection, your temperature rises in an attempt to kill the bacteria or virus that’s making you sick. If the infection is serious, your body could continue to increase its temperature, resulting in fevers, hot flashes, and night sweats.

Tuberculosis HIV Influenza Other febrile illnesses (any illness that causes a fever)

The presence of any of these illnesses is a potential cause of night sweats. Consult your doctor, who might prescribe medications for addressing your frequent night sweats and other symptoms.

Why won’t my night sweats go away?

5. You’re going through menopause (or you’re about to) – You’ve heard of hot flashes, right? Well, also comes with night sweats. “About 75% of perimenopausal women report having night sweats,” says Dr. Ram. “The frequency typically peaks in the first few years following menopause and then declines over time.” Dr. Ram’s tips for reducing menopausal night sweats:

Avoid triggers. Things like alcohol, spicy foods, caffeine and smoking can be sweating triggers. Keep your bedroom cool and sleepwear light. Adjust the thermostat, use fans, open windows (if it’s cold outside), wear breathable pajamas and use lightweight bedding. Cool yourself down. If you wake up in a sweat, uncover your feet and neck, drink a glass of cold water, place a cool washcloth on your head or run cold water over your wrists. Consider lifestyle adjustments. Watching your weight and limiting stress can reduce the frequency or severity of night sweats.

“Talk to your doctor if the above home remedies don’t help limit the amount you’re sweating at night during or after menopause,” says Dr. Ram. “There are some medications that can be prescribed to reduce night sweats.”

Are night sweats normal after being sick?

Are Night Sweats a Cause for Medical Concern for Most People? September 24, 2010 Dear Mayo Clinic: I’m a man, and I have been experiencing night sweats several times a week. And they are more severe in the early morning. Can you offer a possible cause and treatment? Answer: Most people who have night sweats are worried that they indicate some serious underlying disease.

  1. But night sweats are quite common and, for the vast majority of people, don’t represent a medical concern.
  2. We often ask patients how much they are sweating.
  3. Light sweat on the brow or on the pillow is not uncommon during the night when our brain resets our body’s temperature, which normally varies from higher in the evening to lowest in the morning.

For many people, a solution to night sweats may be adjusting the room temperature or removing some extra coverings from the bed. If you are sweating enough that you have to get up and change your nightclothes or the sheets because they are wet, that is more significant.

  • It may indicate a side effect of a medication, such as antidepressants or hormone therapy, or the existence of an underlying illness.
  • Night sweats can be related to infection.
  • For example, if you’ve recently been ill with a minor respiratory infection, a slight fever can cause you to sweat more at night, as your body’s normal day/night temperature reset may be exaggerated.

More serious infections that can cause night sweats include tuberculosis or other bacterial infections, fungal diseases and conditions that are unusual and more chronic, such as disorders of the nervous system or in the body’s hormone-producing glands (endocrine system).

Occasionally, diseases such as cancer cause temperature elevations and night sweats. So if the night sweats are a new symptom, particularly if they are associated with red flags such as fever, change in appetite — particularly decrease in appetite — weight loss, lymph node swelling or rash, you should see a physician for evaluation.

Even without these red flag symptoms, if the night sweats are new and worrisome, or if they’re occurring on a regular basis and interrupting your sleep, a visit with your doctor is not a bad idea. If you have no underlying medical condition, and adjusting room temperatures and bedcovers has not resolved the problem, you may consider asking your doctor about treatment for acid reflux.

Acid reflux is the backward flow of stomach acid into the esophagus — the tube that connects the throat and stomach. Information in the medical literature suggests that night sweats can be associated with acid reflux, which is a relatively common nighttime condition in adults. I have not seen a lot of evidence to substantiate this in my practice, but a simple trial of a medicine to reduce acid production at night for a few weeks shouldn’t be harmful and might provide a solution.

— J. Taylor Hays, M.D., General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. : Are Night Sweats a Cause for Medical Concern for Most People?

Can you have night sweats when you have Covid?

What night sweats are – It’s normal to sweat during the night if the room or your bedding is making you too hot. Night sweats are when you sweat so much that your night clothes and bedding are soaking wet, even though where you’re sleeping is cool. Adults and children can get night sweats.

Are night sweats the end of flu?

Illnesses and disorders that may result in night sweats – Some people have other illnesses or disorders that cause excessive sweating (known as hyperhidrosis) at any time of day or night. But night sweats are different — and they may be temporary or recurring. Some other medical or health conditions that case night sweats include:

​Anxiety or autoimmune disorders Viral illnesses such as colds and the flu cause night sweats, but they resolve on their own — and the associated fever and sweating typically respond to anti-fever medications, such as acetaminophen (TYLENOL®) or ibuprofen (Advil®). Abusing or withdrawal from substances like opioids, cannabis, cocaine, benzodiazepines or alcohol. Sleep disorders such as night terrors or obstructive sleep apnea.

Why am I sweating but have no fever?

Summary – Cold sweats are different from sweat caused by heat or exertion. They’re called diaphoresis and they have many causes, such as a fight-or-flight response, low blood sugar, or life-threatening events like a heart attack or shock. Mechanisms that cause diaphoresis include loss of blood, low blood pressure, and adrenaline directly stimulating the sweat glands.

How do you treat night sweats?

You may experience night sweats with some infections and other health conditions, including menopause and hyperthyroidism. Treatment can depend on the underlying cause. Night sweats is another term for excessive perspiration, or sweating, at night. They’re an uncomfortable part of life for many people and may be associated with depression and difficulty sleeping.

While night sweats are a common symptom of menopause, they can also be caused by some medical conditions and certain medications. In most cases, night sweats aren’t a serious symptom. Still, it’s important to know when to get checked if you have night sweats. It’s normal to sweat at night if the temperature is too warm.

However, some people experience drenching night sweats regularly. Many women experience hot flashes and night sweats during menopause, Night sweats can also be caused by other medical conditions, such as:

infections, like tuberculosis or HIV cancer, such as leukemia or lymphoma anxiety disorders hyperthyroidism hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)

Cancer treatments like chemotherapy and radiation therapy can result in night sweats as well. They can also happen in men who have their testicles removed to treat prostate cancer, In some cases, you may experience night sweats as a side effect of a medication that you’re taking.

This might include certain antidepressants, hormone treatments, and opioids. Consuming too much caffeine or alcohol or using tobacco or drugs may also cause night sweats. To treat night sweats, your doctor will take steps to identify and address their underlying cause. Your treatment plan will depend on your specific diagnosis.

The following are common causes of night sweats with potential treatment options:

Menopause. Lifestyle changes, like sleeping in cool rooms and avoiding alcohol, may help with hot flashes and night sweats. If these aren’t sufficient, hormone therapy may help reduce the number of hot flashes you experience and alleviate other symptoms. Your doctor may also prescribe other medications for hot flashes, such as paroxetine and gabapentin, Venlafaxine is also used off-label for night sweats. Underlying infection. Depending on the type of infection you have, antibiotics, antiviral drugs, or other medications may help treat it. Cancer. Your doctor may recommend a combination of chemotherapy drugs, surgery, or other treatments. Since these treatments can also cause night sweats, they may additionally be treated with hormone therapy or other medications. Anxiety. Your doctor may prescribe medications like anti-anxiety drugs or antidepressants. They may also recommend therapy. Hyperthyroidism. Medications, radioiodine therapy, or sometimes surgery are used to treat overactive thyroid. Medications. Your doctor may adjust your dosage or recommend an alternative drug. Alcohol or caffeine consumption, or drug use. Limiting or avoiding these substances may help reduce night sweats. In some cases, your doctor may prescribe medications or recommend therapy to help you quit.

Your doctor may also advise you to adjust your sleeping habits, Removing blankets from your bed, wearing lighter pajamas, or opening a window in your bedroom may help prevent and alleviate night sweats. It may also help to use air conditioning or a fan, or find a cooler place to sleep.

Night sweats aren’t usually a cause for concern. In some cases, though, they may be a sign of an underlying medical condition that requires treatment. Night sweats are common in menopause, which usually starts around age 50. However, if you experience night sweats and other menopause symptoms before you turn 40, it’s important to talk with your doctor.

This may indicate a condition called primary ovarian insufficiency, It’s also important to seek medical attention if you develop night sweats that happen frequently, disturb your sleep, or are accompanied by other symptoms. Night sweats that occur with a high fever, cough, or unexplained weight loss may be a sign of a serious medical condition.

limit your consumption of alcohol and caffeineavoid using tobacco and drugssleep in a cooler environmentconsider getting a cooling mattress, Shop all Healthline-approved products for hot sleepers in our sleep shop. try to maintain a moderate weightavoid eating spicy food if you have menopause, as it can worsen symptoms

If you suspect your night sweats are related to an infection or other illness, get prompt medical attention. Ask your doctor for more information about your specific condition, treatment options, and strategies to prevent night sweats. Night sweats can be uncomfortable and disrupt your sleep.

Can you sweat out a virus?

Can You Sweat Out a Cold? – Viruses cause common colds. You can contract the virus when other people cough or sneeze and you unintentionally inhale the virus. The most common virus that causes the common cold is rhinovirus, although other viruses can also be the culprit.

  1. Once viruses are in your body, they begin to reproduce.
  2. In response to that, your body mounts an immune reaction,
  3. In fact, some cold symptoms, like congestion, may be signs that your immune system is fighting the infection.
  4. Unfortunately, there is no cure for the common cold.
  5. Once the virus is in your body and reproducing, sweating will not affect it.

You’ll only feel better after your immune system has fought the virus. That takes seven to 10 days for most people.

Why are night sweats a red flag?

Night sweats can be a manifestation of simple infection, underlying malignancy, more complex infections – including TB and HIV – connective tissue disorders, menopause or certain prescribed drugs. It’s also important not to overlook possible psychological causes, such as night terrors secondary to PTSD.

What infection causes night sweats?

What causes night sweats? – Practical reasons for why someone may experience night sweats include:

Spicy foods or hot drinks before bedtime Hot weather or an over-heated bedroom Excessive amounts of blankets or bedclothes Exercising before bedtime

According to Dr. Rosch, the following medical conditions are common causes of night sweats.

Menopause —Known as “hot flashes” during the day, night sweats are very common for women going through menopause and are often the first sign. Infections —Bacterial infections like endocarditis (inflammation of the heart valves) and osteomyelitis (inflammation within the bones) may result in night sweats, with tuberculosis being the most common infection associated with the condition. Chronic sweating —Idiopathic hyperhidrosis is a medical condition in which the body chronically produces too much sweat without any identifiable environmental or medical cause. Cancers —Night sweats can be early indicators of some cancers. However, a person with an undiagnosed cancer typically experiences additional symptoms, such as unexplained weight loss and fever. Hypoglycemia —Since hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can cause sweating, people who are taking medications to lower blood sugar, like insulin and oral anti-diabetics, may experience sweating at night. Hormone disorders —Night sweats can be a result of problems in the hormone-producing glands (endocrine system). If a person receives too much or too little of a hormone, such as serotonin, it can result in flushing and sweating. Night sweats may also be a side effect of hormone therapy medications that regulate the amount of hormones in your system. Anxiety —Stress and emotional problems that cause sweating during the day can often have the same effect at night.

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Before visiting your doctor, try to eliminate the practical causes of night sweats from your daily routine and sleeping environment. “Make sure your bedroom is at a comfortable temperature for sleeping, remove extra blankets from your bed, and refrain from exercising or eating spicy foods late in the evening,” advises Dr.

Why are my night sweats getting worse?

Your environment – Your room, mattress, and pajamas could all influence whether you sweat during the night. Your bed may be adorned with several cozy blankets that cause overheating. Similarly, your pajamas could be too heavy, or your mattress may not be breathable. Adjusting the environment may help alleviate your night sweats.

Do night sweats get rid of toxins?

A woman enjoys an infrared sauna in New York City. While such experiences can have a variety of benefits, claims that they help people sweat out toxins are not backed up by science.

Gory Details

There are plenty of good reasons to work up a sweat. Experts weigh in on whether “detoxifying” your body is one of them. Sweating is a bodily function that used to be taboo, with women in particular being told they don’t sweat, they glow, But look at any fashion magazine or beauty blog today, and you’ll find that sweat is in style.

  • From infrared saunas to hot yoga, towel-soaking activities are being touted not only as relaxation tools, but also as ways to stay healthy by flushing out toxins.
  • Too bad you can’t sweat away toxins any more than you can sweat actual bullets.
  • Recently published calculations back up what scientists have been screaming into their pillows for years: Sweating out toxins is a myth,

Humans sweat to cool ourselves, not to excrete waste products or clear toxic substances. That’s what our kidneys and liver are for. Of course, there’s usually some grain of truth at the heart of a myth, and toxic sweat is no exception. While sweat is made up mostly of water and minerals, it can contain trace amounts of various toxic substances.

What nobody tells you about night sweats?

Waking up from sleep drenched in sweat is an unpleasant, yet common sensation. There are several common reasons for night sweats – from spicy foods to warm bedrooms – but excess sweating can be a sign of a medical condition such as an infection, menopause or cancer. (Getty Images) “Just being hot at night should not worry anyone,” says Dr. Peter Bidey, vice chair and assistant professor of family medicine at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. “It is not uncommon that every once in a while someone might sweat while sleeping. However, it is more concerning if someone is having drenching night sweats on a regular basis.”

Are night sweats an immune response?

Autoimmune Disorders & Night Sweats | Wicked Sheets – Louisville, KY At the first sign of the entrance of new bacteria or a virus, the body’s immune system immediately begins to work to eliminate the potential threats to your health. Symptoms of these frequently include fever and night sweats.

  • However, in some cases, the immune system falsely identifies healthy cells as threats and works to eliminate them.
  • This is known as an autoimmune disease, or autoimmune disorder.
  • Such disorders can affect almost all parts of the body, including the nerves, muscles, skin, lungs, blood vessels, and the heart and brain.

Inflammation is the key sign for an autoimmune disease which results in swelling, pain, and redness. The National Institutes of Health, NIH, approximate nearly 24 million Americans suffer from an autoimmune issue. However, actual numbers are potentially upwards of 50 to 60 million people.

  1. The NIH only accounts for the 24 diseases with which in-depth epidemiological studies exist.
  2. Current research has identified almost 100 autoimmune diseases and research suggests that upwards of 40 more with a potentially autoimmune basis have yet to be classified and named.
  3. Most can be chronic and are often life-threatening.

Markers also indicate many of these diseases and disorders have a genetic component, explaining why autoimmune issues are commonly clustered across family members. Sometimes, for example, a virus can trigger an autoimmune reaction to a person’s predisposed genetic marker.

  1. Furthermore, these diseases often span multiple medical specialties and organs.
  2. Compared to cancer (with 14 million people living in the United States) and heart disease (with data suggesting upwards of 20 million people living with it in the United States) the combined total is still smaller than the population living with an autoimmune disorder.

Costs are estimated in the 100-billion-dollar range annually for treatments in the US alone. Night sweats are symptoms of myriad autoimmune issues and often are signs of hidden infection. Many of the most common autoimmune diseases—Rheumatoid arthritis, Celiac disease, Lupus, Multiple sclerosis, etc.—all share night sweats, fever, and hot flashes as symptoms.

Why am I sweating so much after being sick?

What Makes You Sweat Medically Reviewed by on March 07, 2022 When the temperature rises, your sweat glands (some 2 to 4 million of them) spring into action, making perspiration. Sweating is your body’s natural way of keeping you cool. Some sweat evaporates from your skin, taking heat with it. The rest runs down your face and body. You feel hotter when it’s humid because the wetter air leaves less room for the sweat to evaporate off your body. When you’re angry and reaching your boiling point, your body releases stress hormones that boost your heart rate and blood pressure and raise your body temperature, which can lead to sweating. Anger is a healthy emotion once in a while, but regularly losing your temper could signal a problem. Breaking a sweat is one way to tell that you’re getting a good workout. Because you lose fluid when you sweat – especially when it’s hot – you need to stay hydrated. Remember to drink water before you exercise, during your activity, and after you’re done. This will help your body temperature and performance, too. Anyone who’s missed a big work deadline or choked in front of an audience knows how stress, anxiety, and embarrassment can make you sweat. Emotional stress targets the sweat glands in the palms of your hands and soles of your feet, which is why it can be uncomfortable to shake hands when you’re nervous. Often when you’re sick, your brain raises your body’s thermostat a few degrees. You’ll feel cold and have chills as your body tries to make a less welcoming place for germs. After your fever breaks and your thermostat resets itself to normal, you’ll feel hot and start to sweat. The sweat helps to cool you off to around 98.6 degrees again. You don’t have to have a fever. Sweating can be a symptom of heart-related chest pain, called angina, and a heart attack. Infections, diabetes, and an overactive thyroid gland can also open the floodgates. Some diseases, like cancer, tuberculosis and HIV, may cause night sweats. If you’re sweating a lot and concerned about it, see your doctor. That morning cup of joe will do more than wake you up. Coffee triggers perspiration in two ways. First, caffeine activates the central nervous system, turning on sweat glands (the more caffeine you drink, the more you sweat). Second, the heat from the drink itself can make your body feel hot enough to sweat. When you bite into a double-jalapeno burrito, why does it feel like a four-alarm fire has just erupted in your mouth? Spicy foods fool your body into thinking it’s hot by setting off the same nerve receptors that respond to heat. That’s why a plate of hot wings or bowl of spicy soup can make your tongue sizzle and your face bead up with sweat. During menopause, plunging estrogen levels play tricks on the hypothalamus – the body’s temperature gauge. No matter how frigid it is outside, a hot flash will make your body think you’re in the middle of a heat wave. They are just some of potential menopause-related symptoms called vasomotor symptoms (VMS). You can usually tell right away when someone’s been throwing back a few too many drinks. They’re wobbly on their feet, slurring their speech, and their face is flushed and sweaty. The sweatiness is due to an effect called vasodilation – widening of the blood vessels in the skin.

Here’s another reason to stamp out that cigarette: Nicotine tells your body to release the chemical acetylcholine, which turns on the sweat glands. It also raises your heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature. Nicotine withdrawal also causes excess perspiration, but if you can sweat it out long enough to kick the habit, you’ll lower your odds of getting cancer, emphysema, and dozens of other diseases.

Though they’re meant to make us feel better, some medications can cause their own symptoms. Sweating may be a side effect of many drugs, including some antidepressants, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), blood pressure medications, cancer treatments, and diabetes medicines.

  1. If your medication is making you too sweaty, talk to your doctor about changing your dose or switching to another drug.
  2. You might feel like you’ve lost your head, but falling in love actually starts in your brain, with a rush of adrenaline-like “love chemicals.” These are responsible for the racing heart, sweaty palms, and other telltale physical signs that you’re smitten.

Hormones surging through your body and a faster metabolic rate can make you hotter than usual and make your sweat glands more active. Be sure to drink enough water during those 9 months to keep you and your baby hydrated. After the little one arrives, you’ll keep sweating for a few weeks as your body sheds the extra fluid it hung onto while you were pregnant.

  • SOURCES:
  • American College of Sports Medicine.
  • American Family Physician.
  • Australian Psychological Society.

Breast Cancer.org. Children, Youth, and Women’s Health Service. Collier J. Oxford Handbook of Clinical Specialties, Oxford University Press, 2006. Daytona State College. Family Doctor.org. Gabrielli A. Civetta, Taylor and Kirby’s Critical Care, W.W. Norton & Company, 2008. Goldstein D. Adrenaline and the Inner World, JHU Press, 2006. Hoffmann, R. Ask the Pharmacist, iUniverse, 2005.

  1. How Stuff Works.
  2. Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
  3. Iona College.

Kamei, T. Aanlytica Chimica Acta, June 5, 1998. Krychman M.100 Questions and Answers About Women’s Sexual Wellness and Vitality, Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2009. March of Dimes. McArdle, W. Primary Care Medicine, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2006. Medscape Medical News.

Merck Manual Home Edition. Murphy, S. Run for Life: The Real Woman’s Guide to Running, Globe Pequot, 2004. The Nemours Foundation. The New York Times. Pargman, D. Managing Performance Stress, CRC Press, 2006. Pease B. Why men don’t listen and women can’t read maps, Random House, Inc., 2001. Scientific American.

Swift R. Alcohol Health and Research World, 1998. University of Utah. Weber J. Health Assessment in Nursing, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009. : What Makes You Sweat

Do night sweats burn calories?

You’re dripping with sweat after a hard workout session—so does all that sweat mean you’re burning more calories than usual? The short answer is no. Perspiring a lot can mean putting a lot into your workout, which requires extra energy. Still, more sweat doesn’t equate to more calorie burn, and factors like sweat gland activity play a more significant role in how much sweating happens.

  1. Read on to learn more.
  2. Sweating does a few beneficial things for the body.
  3. One reason why sweating happens is to help the body eliminate impurities, such as metabolic waste and toxicants, or build-up in the skin.
  4. Another primary reason for sweating is to protect you from overheating,
  5. Sweat helps the body automatically regulate its temperature.

Your internal temperature increases during an intense workout, such as high-intensity interval training (HIIT), This temperature increase tells your body it’s time to sweat to cool down. Whenever you sweat, it lowers the amount of body fluid you have.

  • If you lose too much fluid, the result can be dehydration.
  • Dehydration is when you’re not taking in enough fluids to offset the fluids you’ve lost.
  • It can affect many functions of the body, and a person may experience symptoms such as dry mouth, dark urine, dizziness, or less urine or sweat than usual.

The condition can be life-threatening, so seek medical attention if symptoms of dehydration include:

ConfusionFaintingLack of urinationRapid breathing or heartbeatShock

To prevent dehydration, ensure you drink enough water daily. How much every person needs will vary based on different factors like age or sex. Also, remember to stay hydrated with even more fluids if you are in hot weather, exercising in the heat, or are sick.

  1. Sweating can affect how many calories you burn but at an insignificant level.
  2. This is because the body uses calories to start sweating since sweat glands use glucose as energy to function.
  3. This function falls under metabolism, which includes every energy-using or energy-converting process in the body.

Metabolism is also directly associated with the intensity of exercise you do, making it more critical in the calorie-burn process. You might still notice you or someone else may be sweating more during physical activity or even during rest. There are different reasons some people sweat more or less than others, related to sweat gland functioning and temperature acclimation.

Do night sweats happen every night?

What Causes Night Sweats? Key Takeaways

  • Infrequent, mild sweating during sleep, especially in a warm room, is usually not cause for concern.
  • Waking up often due to night sweats may be caused by underlying health issues, like medication side effects, infections, or hormone changes.
  • Talk to your doctor if you have consistent night sweats for help determining the cause.

Sweating is normal and a core part of how the body regulates its temperature. In a sauna or working out in the gym, sweating profusely is expected. Waking up sweating in the middle of the night is another matter altogether. Night sweats can be defined as sweating in excess of that required by the body to regulate body temperature.

  1. Underlying health issues may be responsible for these episodes of considerable sweating in your sleep.
  2. Night sweats can reduce sleep quality, concern a bed partner, and provoke serious discomfort.
  3. As a result, it is natural to want to know more about the causes of night sweats and how to resolve them.

The body’s is complex and influenced by multiple factors, which can make it hard in some cases to know exactly why a person experiences night sweats. That said, common causes identified in research about night sweats include menopause, medications, infections, and hormone problems.

Menopause is when women permanently stop having their period Office on Women’s Health (OWH) OWH coordinates women’s health efforts across HHS and addresses critical women’s health issues by informing and advancing policies, educating health care professionals and consumers, and supporting innovative programs.

During this time, significant changes in the body’s production of the hormones estrogen and progesterone are believed to be an important driver of hot flashes National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information. Hot flashes are considered to be a hallmark of menopause National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information., affecting up to 85% of women National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information.

  • In most cases, hot flashes actually begin in the transition time before menopause, known as perimenopause, and can continue once a woman is postmenopausal.
  • Menopausal hot flashes normally last for a few minutes and can occur multiple times per day, including at night, when they can cause night sweats.
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It is common for hot flashes to continue occurring for several years, and some women experience them for more than two decades. Perhaps not surprisingly, many women — up to 64% — report sleeping problems and higher rates of insomnia National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information.

During perimenopause and menopause. While night sweats are not the only cause of these sleeping difficulties, they can contribute to poor sleep, especially when they are severe. Certain medications are known to be associated with night sweats Merck Manual First published in 1899 as a small reference book for physicians and pharmacists, the Manual grew in size and scope to become one of the most widely used comprehensive medical resources for professionals and consumers.

These include some antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), steroids, and medicines taken to lower fevers, such as aspirin or acetaminophen, that may paradoxically cause sweating. For some, can be a cause of generalized sweating.

  • Alcohol and drug use can also increase the risk of night sweats National Health Service (NHS) The NHS website for England is the UK’s biggest health website, with more than 50 million visits every month.
  • Changes in the endocrine system United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) The mission of EPA is to protect human health and the environment.

, which controls hormone levels in the body, can be connected to night sweats. Examples of hormone problems with links to night sweats include hyperthyroidism Merck Manual First published in 1899 as a small reference book for physicians and pharmacists, the Manual grew in size and scope to become one of the most widely used comprehensive medical resources for professionals and consumers.

, and elevated blood sugar, and abnormal levels of sex hormones. The part of the brain that regulates body temperature is known as the hypothalamus, and it is also involved in the endocrine system. Hypothalamic dysfunction Medline Plus MedlinePlus is an online health information resource for patients and their families and friends.

may be an underlying issue related to hormone imbalances and night sweats. Beyond the most common causes, other conditions may give rise to night sweats. Hot flashes may be more common during pregnancy and the postpartum period National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information.

Anxiety and panic attacks have also been correlated with night sweats. Night sweats can be a symptom of certain types of cancer or a side effect of cancer treatments National Cancer Institute (NCI) The NCI is the federal government’s principal agency for cancer research and training. Surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy for cancer may provoke night sweats.

Night sweats can be worrying and bothersome, and they frequently are tied to serious sleep disruptions. As a result, it is natural for anyone dealing with night sweats to want to know how to avoid them and sleep more soundly. The most effective treatment for night sweats will vary for any individual patient and should always be overseen by a health professional.

Some potential treatment methods include modifications to environment and behavior, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and medication. A standard approach to night sweats, especially those related to menopause, is to start by trying straightforward changes National Institutes on Aging (NIA) NIA leads a broad scientific effort to understand the nature of aging and to extend the healthy, active years of life.

that can minimize the frequency and severity of night sweats. This may include changes to your sleep environment.

  • Sleep in a cooler bedroom: While a warmer bedroom is not the central cause of night sweats, it may facilitate or trigger them. Keeping the thermostat at a lower temperature can keep heat from building up around your body during the night.
  • Replace your mattress: Certain mattresses are more likely to retain heat than others, especially if they conform closely and restrict airflow. A can prevent heat retention and help you keep cool throughout the night. If you are experiencing, a mattress that offers pressure relief and ample airflow may help reduce symptoms. A or is worth considering instead if you do not want to replace your mattress.
  • Invest in new bedding: In addition to assessing your current mattress, you may want to consider changing up your bedding. Lightweight, breathable can help wick away moisture. You may also want to swap out a heavy duvet or comforter for a lighter quilt.
  • Wear breathable clothing: Tight-fitting clothes trap heat, so it is best to wear lightweight, loose-fitting clothes made with materials that are breathable and airy. Dressing in layers makes it easier to make adjustments to maintain a comfortable temperature.

In addition to adjusting your sleep environment, you may want to consider changes to your daily habits to improve your overall health and sleep.

  • Avoid caffeine, alcohol, and spicy foods: All of these things can cause spikes in body temperature and induce sweating. Avoiding them, especially in the evening, may cut down on night sweats.
  • Drink cold water: Having a small amount of cool water before going to bed may help you maintain a more pleasant temperature.
  • Maintain a healthy weight: Some research has identified a correlation between higher body weight and night sweats. Being overweight or obese can contribute to other health problems, including those that affect sleep, such as sleep apnea.
  • Utilize relaxation techniques: Finding at night can make it easier to fall asleep. Studies also suggest that techniques like controlled breathing may help to meaningfully reduce hot flashes National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information. in menopausal women.

Many of these tips overlap with broader that can be gradually implemented to make your sleep-related habits work in your favor for more consistent and high-quality sleep. Additional treatments for night sweats include cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and medications.

Studies have found that cognitive behavioral therapy for hot flashes and night sweats can reduce their frequency National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information. and improve mood and quality of life in menopausal women.

CBT is compatible with other approaches, such as behavior modifications, and likely has the greatest effect on night sweats National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information.

  • When combined with other approaches.
  • Several types of drugs, notably hormone therapies, can reduce night sweats, but these drugs can have significant side effects.
  • A doctor is in the best position to discuss the benefits and downsides of any specific medication.
  • Consult with your doctor for treatment recommendations and changes to your current medications.

You should talk to your doctor if you have night sweats that are frequent or persistent. You should also mention them if they interfere with your sleep, negatively affect your daily life, or occur with other health changes. Meeting with a doctor is important because they can help determine the most likely cause and work with you to create a treatment plan that takes your symptoms and overall health into account.

  1. It is also important to let the doctor know about any sleeping problems that you have.
  2. Sleep disorders, like, may be causing daytime sleepiness and, according to some research, may also be a factor promoting night sweats National Library of Medicine, Biotech Information The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access to biomedical and genomic information.

Medical Disclaimer: The content on this page should not be taken as medical advice or used as a recommendation for any specific treatment or medication. Always consult your doctor before taking a new medication or changing your current treatment.

  1. Office on Women’s Health. (2021, February 22). Menopause.U.S. Department of Health and Human Services., Retrieved June 27, 2022 from
  2. Freedman R.R. (2014). Menopausal hot flashes: Mechanisms, endocrinology, treatment. The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 142, 115–120.
  3. Xu, H., Thurston, R.C., Matthews, K.A., Bryce, C.L., Hays, R.D., Kapoor, W.N., Ness, R.B., & Hess, R. (2012). Are hot flashes associated with sleep disturbance during midlife? Results from the STRIDE cohort study. Maturitas, 71(1), 34–38.
  4. Ohayon M.M. (2006). Severe hot flashes are associated with chronic insomnia. Archives of Internal Medicine, 166(12), 1262–1268.
  5. Baker, F.C., de Zambotti, M., Colrain, I.M., & Bei, B. (2018). Sleep problems during the menopausal transition: Prevalence, impact, and management challenges. Nature and Science of Sleep, 10, 73–95.
  6. Das, S. (2018, December). Hyperhidrosis. Merck Manual Professional Version., Retrieved June 29, 2022, from
  7. National Health Service (UK). (2017, December 17). Night sweats., Retrieved June 29, 2022, from
  8. United States Environmental Protection Agency. (2017, January 24). What is the endocrine system?, Retrieved June 29, 2022, from
  9. Hershman, J.M. (2019, August). Hyperthyroidism. Merck Manual Consumer Version., Retrieved June 29, 2022, from
  10. A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia. (2021, May 13). Hypothyroidism dysfunction. MedlinePlus., Retrieved June 27, 2022, from
  11. Thurston, R.C., Luther, J.F., Wisniewski, S.R., Eng, H., & Wisner, K.L. (2013). Prospective evaluation of nighttime hot flashes during pregnancy and postpartum. Fertility and Sterility, 100(6), 1667–1672.
  12. National Cancer Institute. Hot flashes and night sweats (PDQ) – Patient version., Retrieved June 27, 2022, from
  13. National Institute on Aging. (2017, June 26). Hot flashes: What can I do?, Retrieved June 29, 2022, from
  14. Freedman R.R. (2005). Hot flashes: Behavioral treatments, mechanisms, and relation to sleep. The American Journal of Medicine, 118 Suppl 12B, 124–130.
  15. Ayers, B., Smith, M., Hellier, J., Mann, E., & Hunter, M.S. (2012). Effectiveness of group and self-help cognitive behavior therapy in reducing problematic menopausal hot flushes and night sweats (MENOS 2): A randomized controlled trial. Menopause (New York, N.Y.), 19(7), 749–759.
  16. Kadakia, K.C., Loprinzi, C.L., & Barton, D.L. (2012). Hot flashes: The ongoing search for effective interventions. Menopause (New York, N.Y.), 19(7), 719–721.
  17. Arnardottir, E.S., Janson, C., Bjornsdottir, E., Benediktsdottir, B., Juliusson, S., Kuna, S.T., Pack, A.I., & Gislason, T. (2013). Nocturnal sweating–A common symptom of obstructive sleep apnoea: The Icelandic sleep apnoea cohort. BMJ Open, 3(5), e002795.

: What Causes Night Sweats?

Do night sweats go away on their own?

Common Causes of Night Sweats – It’s normal to sweat a little bit at night. Most often, it happens because you’re overdressed or your bedroom is too warm. True night sweats are more intense episodes of sweating, They can wake you from a sound sleep and leave you and your sheets soaking wet.

Why are night sweats a red flag?

Night sweats can be a manifestation of simple infection, underlying malignancy, more complex infections – including TB and HIV – connective tissue disorders, menopause or certain prescribed drugs. It’s also important not to overlook possible psychological causes, such as night terrors secondary to PTSD.

How do I get rid of my night sweats?

You may experience night sweats with some infections and other health conditions, including menopause and hyperthyroidism. Treatment can depend on the underlying cause. Night sweats is another term for excessive perspiration, or sweating, at night. They’re an uncomfortable part of life for many people and may be associated with depression and difficulty sleeping.

  1. While night sweats are a common symptom of menopause, they can also be caused by some medical conditions and certain medications.
  2. In most cases, night sweats aren’t a serious symptom.
  3. Still, it’s important to know when to get checked if you have night sweats.
  4. It’s normal to sweat at night if the temperature is too warm.

However, some people experience drenching night sweats regularly. Many women experience hot flashes and night sweats during menopause, Night sweats can also be caused by other medical conditions, such as:

infections, like tuberculosis or HIV cancer, such as leukemia or lymphoma anxiety disorders hyperthyroidism hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)

Cancer treatments like chemotherapy and radiation therapy can result in night sweats as well. They can also happen in men who have their testicles removed to treat prostate cancer, In some cases, you may experience night sweats as a side effect of a medication that you’re taking.

This might include certain antidepressants, hormone treatments, and opioids. Consuming too much caffeine or alcohol or using tobacco or drugs may also cause night sweats. To treat night sweats, your doctor will take steps to identify and address their underlying cause. Your treatment plan will depend on your specific diagnosis.

The following are common causes of night sweats with potential treatment options:

Menopause. Lifestyle changes, like sleeping in cool rooms and avoiding alcohol, may help with hot flashes and night sweats. If these aren’t sufficient, hormone therapy may help reduce the number of hot flashes you experience and alleviate other symptoms. Your doctor may also prescribe other medications for hot flashes, such as paroxetine and gabapentin, Venlafaxine is also used off-label for night sweats. Underlying infection. Depending on the type of infection you have, antibiotics, antiviral drugs, or other medications may help treat it. Cancer. Your doctor may recommend a combination of chemotherapy drugs, surgery, or other treatments. Since these treatments can also cause night sweats, they may additionally be treated with hormone therapy or other medications. Anxiety. Your doctor may prescribe medications like anti-anxiety drugs or antidepressants. They may also recommend therapy. Hyperthyroidism. Medications, radioiodine therapy, or sometimes surgery are used to treat overactive thyroid. Medications. Your doctor may adjust your dosage or recommend an alternative drug. Alcohol or caffeine consumption, or drug use. Limiting or avoiding these substances may help reduce night sweats. In some cases, your doctor may prescribe medications or recommend therapy to help you quit.

Your doctor may also advise you to adjust your sleeping habits, Removing blankets from your bed, wearing lighter pajamas, or opening a window in your bedroom may help prevent and alleviate night sweats. It may also help to use air conditioning or a fan, or find a cooler place to sleep.

Night sweats aren’t usually a cause for concern. In some cases, though, they may be a sign of an underlying medical condition that requires treatment. Night sweats are common in menopause, which usually starts around age 50. However, if you experience night sweats and other menopause symptoms before you turn 40, it’s important to talk with your doctor.

This may indicate a condition called primary ovarian insufficiency, It’s also important to seek medical attention if you develop night sweats that happen frequently, disturb your sleep, or are accompanied by other symptoms. Night sweats that occur with a high fever, cough, or unexplained weight loss may be a sign of a serious medical condition.

limit your consumption of alcohol and caffeineavoid using tobacco and drugssleep in a cooler environmentconsider getting a cooling mattress, Shop all Healthline-approved products for hot sleepers in our sleep shop. try to maintain a moderate weightavoid eating spicy food if you have menopause, as it can worsen symptoms

If you suspect your night sweats are related to an infection or other illness, get prompt medical attention. Ask your doctor for more information about your specific condition, treatment options, and strategies to prevent night sweats. Night sweats can be uncomfortable and disrupt your sleep.

Do night sweats happen every night?

Night sweats can happen for a number of reasons, and many of them aren’t too serious, such as being too hot or hormonal fluctuations. In some cases, regular episodes of night sweating could indicate a serious medical condition. It’s not uncommon to sweat at night.

You may sweat a little or a lot, depending on how many blankets you sleep with, how warm your room is, and even what you ate before bed. But if you sweat enough that you regularly wake up with wet pajamas and bedding, there could be an underlying medical issue. Read on to learn more about possible causes of night sweats, tips to relieve night sweats on your own, and when it may be a good idea to see your healthcare professional.

It’s not always possible to determine the cause of night sweats. But other symptoms you experience along with nighttime sweating could help you narrow down an underlying medical cause.