How Frequently Should A Thermometer Be Calibrated For Accuracy
Recalibrate your thermometer often – A calibrated food thermometer is vital to your ability to prepare and serve safe food. Make sure to test your thermometer often to make sure it stays accurate. The exact calibration schedule depends on the type of thermometer you use and how you use it. The following are some guidelines for when you should recalibrate your thermometers.

  • In general, you should calibrate bimetal thermometers before every single shift.
  • Calibrate digital thermometers every week or month,
  • Always calibrate new thermometers or a thermometer that has been dropped.
  • It’s also a good idea to calibrate a thermometer after using it to measure significantly different temperatures,
  • For best results, follow the manufacturer’s instructions.

Now you know how to calibrate a thermometer! For more food safety tips, check out our food handler training, — Katie Heil

How often should I calibrate a thermometer?

➢ Thermometers should be calibrated whenever they are dropped, before first used, and weekly if not check for reasons above. ➢ Temperature is a critical measurement of ensuring the safety and quality of many food products.

How often should a thermometer be checked for accuracy?

Thermometers should be calibrated: before use; if dropped; when going from one temperature range to another; and after a long storage time. In most applications, a thermometer should be within ±1°F or ±0.5°C when compared to the reference thermometer used for calibration.

How frequently should a thermometer be calibrated for accuracy 360 training?

When Should You Calibrate a Food Thermometer? – Your thermometer calibration schedule will depend on the type of food thermometer and the manufacturer’s recommendations. Thermometer calibration is necessary:

When the thermometer is new After a thermometer has been dropped After a thermometer has experienced an extreme temperature change

You should also calibrate your thermometers regularly. It’s best to use the manufacturer’s recommended schedule, but generally speaking:

Bimetallic thermometers, which use the properties of two different metals to detect temperature, need to be calibrated before every shift. Digital thermometers need to be calibrated weekly or monthly.

Should food thermometers be calibrated regularly for accurate temperature readings?

In order to ensure that your thermometer is accurate, the thermometer should be calibrated regularly according to manufacturer’s recommendations and after an extreme temperature change or if the unit has been dropped. Thermometers may be calibrated by the ice point method or the boiling point method.

How often is calibration required?

How often should you calibrate? The question isn’t whether to calibrate, it’s how often to? There is no “one size fits all” answer. In most cases the requirements vary depending on application, QA requirements, industry standards, performance, or safety regulations.

Calibration is often the key to negating a recall, out-of-tolerance condition, or potential safety concern. There are a few possible points to consider when reviewing calibration frequencies to help you decide what is best for your process, equipment, and application. Manufacturer-recommended calibration interval.

Manufacturers’ specifications, which are usually located in the manual, indicate how often to calibrate their tools. Keep in mind that critical measurement applications may require different intervals, usually more frequent, stringent, or industry-defined (ASTM 2570, ISO 9000, ISO/IEC 17025, MIL-STD xxx).

  • Before a major critical measuring project.
  • Suppose you are taking a plant down for testing, and that plant requires highly accurate measurements.
  • Decide which instruments you will use for that testing and ensure those instruments are well within specification before using them.
  • Send them out for calibration, then “lock them down” in storage so they are unused before the test.

Calibrating before a critical measuring project is extremely important. If you will be making decisions or taking actions based on the measurement results, you’ll want to ensure with a high degree of confidence that the standards used remained in tolerance.

  • After a major critical measuring project.
  • Just as it’s important to calibrate before a major critical measuring project, it’s important to calibrate afterwards.
  • If you reserved calibrated test instruments for a critical test, it is best practice to send that same equipment for calibration after the testing.

When the calibration results come back, you will know whether the tests done with the instrument were complete and reliable. In some industries, like pharmaceutical, calibrating before and after a major critical measuring project may be required. This ensures the reference used can show whether an intolerance condition occurred before, during, and after the critical measurement project.

  1. After an event,
  2. If your instrument took a hit—for example, something knocked out the internal overload protection or the unit absorbed a physical impact-it is best practice to send it out for calibration to have the integrity checked.
  3. This is important because sometimes there may not be a visible physical defect on the unit like a dent, scratch, or broken connector.

Calibration will verify that the unit and the critical internal components are in good working order. Per requirements, Some measurement jobs require calibrated, certified test equipment regardless of the project size. Note that this requirement may not be explicitly stated but simply expected based on industry standards.

  • Always review the specifications and requirements of a process before the test.
  • The most common requirement is annual calibration, but this can vary dramatically depending on the application, industry regulation, or QA requirements.
  • Monthly, quarterly, or semiannually.
  • If you do mostly critical measurements and do them often, a shorter time span between calibrations means less chance of questionable test results.

Many times, calibrating at shorter intervals will afford you with better specifications. Users should look for trends in their calibrated equipment and periodically review, then note changes. As equipment gets older, for example, you may see the equipment drift before the next calibration cycle.

Reviewing trends or year-over-year calibration results helps users understand when an instrument should be calibrated specific to your application and usage. Users may choose to calibrate instruments in shorter or longer cycles depending on the results they see over time. Annually. If you do a mix of critical and non-critical measurements, annual calibration tends to strike the right balance between prudence and cost.

Biannually, If you seldom do critical measurements and don’t expose your meter to an event, calibration at long frequencies can be cost-effective. Never. If your work requires just gross voltage checks (“Yep, that’s 480 V”), calibration seems like overkill.

What is the frequency of calibration?

The standard periodicity of calibration of the measuring instrument is annual, except for the most critical instruments which, under normal operating conditions, should be recalibrated at least twice a year.

How long is a thermometer calibration good for?

Recalibrate your thermometer often – A calibrated food thermometer is vital to your ability to prepare and serve safe food. Make sure to test your thermometer often to make sure it stays accurate. The exact calibration schedule depends on the type of thermometer you use and how you use it. The following are some guidelines for when you should recalibrate your thermometers.

  • In general, you should calibrate bimetal thermometers before every single shift.
  • Calibrate digital thermometers every week or month,
  • Always calibrate new thermometers or a thermometer that has been dropped.
  • It’s also a good idea to calibrate a thermometer after using it to measure significantly different temperatures,
  • For best results, follow the manufacturer’s instructions.

Now you know how to calibrate a thermometer! For more food safety tips, check out our food handler training, — Katie Heil

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Do thermometers lose accuracy over time?

One of the most basic attributes of any thermometer is its accuracy. Inaccurate thermometers lead to misinformed decisions about cooking, health, manufacturing, or any other process involving critical temperatures and can lead to disastrous results, Small unobserved increases or decreases in temperature can actually have profound effects upon the growth of bacteria, the pliability of plastics, the interaction of chemicals, the safety of food, or the tenderness of meat.

And yet, unlike distance or volume, for example, that can be measured directly by a tape measure or a measuring cup, temperature is a measure of the average kinetic energy of the subatomic particles in an object and cannot be measured directly, Instead, thermometers measure temperature indirectly, by actually measuring other physical phenomena that change as temperature changes.

Things like Calibrating a Thermapen ONE with a Fluke 1595A Super Thermometer

  • the expansion or contraction of liquids in the case of mercury or alcohol thermometers
  • the expansion or contraction of metals in the case of dial thermometers
  • changes in the speed of the flow of electrons in the case of thermistor thermometers, like ThermoPop®
  • changes in the amplitude of voltage in the case of thermocouple thermometers, like Thermapen® ONE

More importantly, although we are interested in the temperature of the article or process we are measuring, the thermometer is always measuring the temperature of itself, not the temperature of the surroundings, This temperature represents the temperature of the surrounds if the thermometer is in thermal equilibrium with the surroundings.

For example, when people use an old candy thermometer to measure the candy stage of boiled sugar/water mixture, the thing being measured by the thermometer is the expansion of the red-died alcohol in the glass tube after the bulb of the tube is placed in the boiling sugar mixture, not the expansion of the sugar mixture itself.

Thermistor thermometers measure the increase or decrease in resistance in the metal oxide semiconductor sheathed in their own probe tip. Thermocouple thermometers measure the increase or decrease in voltage in the alloyed metals inside their own probes.

  1. unlike tape measures or measuring cups, thermometers don’t measure temperature directly, they measure other physical phenomena that change when temperature changes
  2. and thermometers don’t actually measure those physical changes in the material being measured, they measure them inside their own systems when exposed to the material being measured.

ThermoWorks A2LA-Accredited Calibration Laboratory and its trained staff at ThermoWorks headquarters in Utah Because thermometers are not measuring temperature directly in this way, determining their accuracy and tracking their continued performance over time present unique challenges,

  1. The markings on your tape measure or measuring cup don’t change over time, but thermometers can actually lose their accuracy over time,
  2. This potential for instruments to lose accuracy over time is sometimes called “drift,” because the relationship between the system of the thermometer and the actual properties of the material being measured can “drift” away from each other.

Drift in thermometers necessitates periodic re-checks or “calibration.” Read more about what affects the accuracy of thermometers below

How often should a measuring device be calibrated?

Calibration Frequencies you may find Helpful – Manufacturers recommendation – This frequency must be kept up with, but you should not that critical measurements may need different intervals. Before a major critical measuring project – If you have a project that needs extremely accurate measurements, you should first decide which instruments to use.

  1. Then, you should send them for calibration and lock them down in storage until testing begins.
  2. This will ensure you get the most accurate results.
  3. After a major critical measuring project ends – After a major critical measuring project, you should send the same equipment for calibration.
  4. When you receive the results, you can confirm the accuracy of your testing results for that project.

After an accident/event – You might have to think about having the instrument checked for accuracy following a hit. This could be events such as having something knocked out of the internal overload or any physical impact. Individual project requirements – Regardless of the project size, each job will have a different requirement for calibration.

Some must be certified and calibrated test equipment. Others, however, may not need stringent calibration standards. These requirements may not be explicitly stated, so you should review the spec before the test. Monthly, quarterly or semi-annually – If you often do critical measurements, then a shorter timeframe between calibrations will mean there’s less chance of questionable test results.

Calibrating often at shorter intervals will afford you with better specifications. Depending on how often you use them, you may need to calibrate monthly, quarterly or semi-annually. One way to achieve this is to use a circuit with known readings, a proprietary calibration card or checkbox.

Annually – If you carry out both critical and non-critical measurements, annual calibration is often a good choice with the right balance between prudence and cost. Biannually – If you don’t often carry out critical measurements and don’t expose your meter to an event, calibration at long frequencies can be a more cost-effective choice.

Finally, your business insurance may require you have a valid calibration certificate. This is in addition to an awarding organisation. It is advisable that you check with them.

What should a thermometer be calibrated to?

Hold the calibration nut securely with a wrench or other tool and rotate the head of the thermometer until it reads 32˚F (0˚C). Thermometers should be calibrated regularly to make sure the readings are correct. The ice-point method is the most widely used method to calibrate a thermometer.

Why do thermometers need to be calibrated?

Why is it necessary to calibrate a thermometer? – It is necessary to calibrate a thermometer to assure accurate readings, as the accuracy of a thermometer can drift over time. Thermometers can drift over time for various reasons. One reason a thermometer can drift is mechanical shock.

  1. Highly accurate thermometers, like standard platinum resistance thermometers (SPRTs), contain delicate sensors at their tips that can malfunction from mechanical shock caused by improper handling.
  2. Sometimes, people in the shop or lab aren’t aware of the need to carefully handle thermometers and end up banging them against things, and even treating them roughly like common tools in a toolbox.

Another reason a thermometer can drift is exposure to extreme temperatures. Some organizations need to measure extremely cold temperatures in the middle of a large freezer. They sometimes incorrectly place the entire thermometer in the freezer. While the probe portion of the thermometer is rated for the extremely cold temperature, the handle usually is not.

Exposure of the handle to the extreme temperature can cause the thermometer to drift. Exposure of the thermometer handle to extremely high temperatures can also cause the thermometer to drift. One way the handle can get too hot is during a calibration itself. If calibrating at an extremely high temperature, such as 600 degrees Celsius, in a dry-well furnace, care needs to be taken to shield the handle.

These are some of the reasons that thermometers can drift and why it’s necessary to regularly calibrate them. An industrial calibrator using a reference probe to calibrate a thermometer

What happens if you don’t calibrate a thermometer?

Accidents & Injury – Leaving equipment uncalibrated can even pose a threat in some laboratories. In labs with large pieces of equipment and machinery, any errors can be dangerous to those operating these tools. When it comes to digital tools, the lack of calibration can pose an electrocution hazard.

Thermometers and other temperature-regulating devices must be calibrated, or you risk working with uncontrolled temperatures. Medical labs should be especially wary of this, considering many specimens must be kept at certain temperatures to maintain quality. If you let equipment go so far down its lifetime without being recalibrated, it could even malfunction and cause injury.

Preventing injuries is the number one priority once you enter the lab space, and maintaining your equipment is one of these preventative measures. Now that we have explored what happens when you don’t calibrate your lab equipment, we hope you better understand why calibration is so important in the laboratory.

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All these warnings also serve as a look into the benefits of calibration as well. For example, this process helps you ensure accurate results, helps your laboratory stay certified and up-to-date with procedures, saves money on materials and equipment costs, and prevents accidents and injury. If you don’t already, we suggest starting regular inspections and checks of all your equipment.

Schedule calibration check-ins at regular intervals even before you see any measurement differences for preventing damage. And if you discover any damage to your equipment during your inspections, you can find adequate replacements here at USA Lab Equipment. : What Happens When You Don’t Calibrate Your Lab Equipment

What is the time limit between conducting a calibration and a calibration check?

Alcovisor Jupiter Calibration for devices with 4 Home Screen Icons – (It is recommended to set your AUTO OFF timer to 10 minutes to complete Calibration 1. Select the Settings Icon and select “Cal.”.2. Enter the password. Please refer to the Advanced Settings manual for password.3.

Mg/100mL % % & g/L
20.0 0.02 0.20
50.0 0.05 0.50
80.0 0.080 0.80
100.0 0.10 1.00
150.0 0.15 1.50

More examples are in the table above: 5. Select right arrow icon to confirm.6. The next screen to appear is the calibration screen. The first line shown is the concentration of the calibration solution/cylinder. The second line is the temperature (22 to 28 C).

  • The third line is the calibrated value (to be tested).7.
  • Place a new mouthpiece on the Jupiter and Connect the Jupiter to the cylinder.
  • Note: Firmly press down on the mouthpiece to make sure the mouthpiece is securely attached to the Jupiter.regulator.8.
  • Press the gas regulator button, allowing gas to flow into the mouthpiece for 8-10 seconds.

While still pressing on the gas, press the Cal. button to acquire a sample. The gas MUST be flowing into the mouthpiece while the sample is taken. Once you hear the pump click, indicating the sample has been taken, you can release your finger from the gas and remove the device from the regulator.9.

  • A “Wait” screen will briefly flash and then the Calibration Completed screen will display.
  • The calibrated value in the third line will be changed (this value is a mixture of letters and numbers).10.
  • Select to confirm.11.
  • Wait 3-5 minutes and perform the Calibration Check.
  • A Calibration Check must always be performed following the calibration to ensure successful calibration.

You must do this step in order for Calibration data to be saved. For assistance with performing a calibration check, please see the Accuracy Check Tutorial. : Calibration Tutorial

What is the standard for calibration?

What about quality standards? – When people talk about calibration standards, they don’t always mean physical instruments. Sometimes they might be referring to quality standards or regulations that specify calibration. For example, ISO 9001 is a quality standard that requires certified companies to calibrate their measurement equipment, plus document the processes and procedures involved.

What happens if calibration is not done?

EQUIPMENT CALIBRATIONS – What Happens if you do not Calibrate The process of calibrations is the comparison between standard and tested measurements. Instrument calibration is important in order to provide good and accurate measurements. What can go wrong if you choose NOT to calibrate your equipment POOR RELIABILITY: When you have a calibrated machine, you can prove that the test equipment is maintained well and is regularly services.

  • When you do not calibrate regularly, the reliability of the measurements will go down.
  • INACCURATE RESULTS : If you do not calibrate your equipment, it will not give accurate measurements.
  • When the measurements are not accurate, the final results will also be inaccurate, and the quality of the product will be sub-standard.

SAFETY FACTORS: Uncalibrated equipment can pose a number of safety risks.

Risk of electrical shocks for those handling improperly calibrated equipment (especially in a hazardous work zone where electricity is present)If you do not calibrate temperature controlling or sensing devices, you will not be able to regulate the temperature of the facility, causing employees to work in uncontrolled temperatures.If you use uncalibrated test equipment to check the temperature in a pharmaceutical or food storage unit, the product can spoil and put consumers lives at risk.If tire gauges are not calibrated, the incorrect measurement may increase the wear on the tire and reduce traction, increasing the chances of a car accident.One negative feedback or comment from a customer is enough to rattle the reputation of your company. To protect the loss of reputation, use calibration services by accredited calibration labs to ensure that your business does not lose its good reputation.

POOR QUALITY: If you cannot measure temperature accurately in production or manufacturing processes, there will be quality issues in the finished product. OVERALL COSTS GO UP AND DIP IN PROFITS: Unnecessary waste translates to increased costs. If you consume more energy than required, you would be spending money unnecessarily and the overall costs will go up.

  • Poor quality will show a dip in your sales and it may even lead to a product recall.
  • There are a number of risks of not calibrating your instruments.
  • Do not put your business and product quality in jeopardy.
  • Ensure high reliability by performing calibration as it will make sure that your test equipment performs with accepted standards and achieves quality assurance.

At Scientific Instrument Center, Inc, we provide a high caliber of service for medical equipment calibration to scientific equipment repair. To learn more about our Calibration services, you may or give us a call at (614) 771-4700. We are here to answer any questions you may have.

How accurate is calibration?

What is calibration? – Calibration is a comparison between a known measurement (the standard) and the measurement using your instrument. Typically, the accuracy of the standard should be ten times the accuracy of the measuring device being tested. However, an accuracy ratio of 3:1 is acceptable by most standards organizations.

Sure Controls provides preventative field service to help you ensure your instruments and controls are accurately calibrated. Calibration of your measuring instruments has two objectives: it checks the accuracy of the instrument and it determines the traceability of the measurement. In practice, calibration also includes repair of the device if it is out of calibration.

A report is provided by the calibration expert, which shows the error in measurements with the measuring device before and after the calibration. To explain how calibration is performed we can use an external micrometer as an example. Here, accuracy of the scale is the main parameter for calibration.

Why is calibration schedule important?

The Importance of a Calibration Schedule – Understanding calibration frequency starts with recognizing how important it is to calibrate your equipment. When you calibrate your equipment properly, you ensure its measurements are inside a known value’s predetermined range.

  1. If the measurements fall out of an acceptable range, you can calibrate the equipment, adjusting the equipment’s measuring system to ensure its results fall into the known value’s acceptable range.
  2. By calibrating the equipment regularly, you’ll receive greater equipment accuracy.
  3. Various factors can affect your instrument’s measurements, causing them to drift or fall out of the appropriate range.

For example, workplace error, improper handling, operator error and huge temperature swings can all affect an instrument’s accuracy. Inaccurate readings can cause you to discard acceptable parts, run unnecessary tests and perform other production inefficiencies.

  1. Since most equipment needs routine calibration to ensure it delivers accurate measurements, you need to understand how often you should calibrate your equipment.
  2. As you develop a routine calibration schedule, you’ll find that different instruments and machinery will have different equipment calibration frequency requirements.

By developing a calibration schedule based on your equipment’s unique needs, you can keep it in the best condition possible.

What is calibration period?

Calibration Period Calibration Period is a limited time process where a new task, group of tasks, or process is performed in a controlled environment with the goal of measuring resources, workforce needed for the execution of the task in a long term engagement, and the quality range expected from its output.

  • It is normally performed in the context of the elaboration of a service level agreement (SLA) between a vendor and a client, with the purpose of determining pricing, scope, duration, and resources allocated to a project or service.
  • One of the standard outputs of a Calibration Period is the average handle time (AHT) of a specific task, which is the average time, usually in seconds, taken by a trained specialist to perform the task.
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: Calibration Period

What happens if you don’t calibrate a thermometer?

Accidents & Injury – Leaving equipment uncalibrated can even pose a threat in some laboratories. In labs with large pieces of equipment and machinery, any errors can be dangerous to those operating these tools. When it comes to digital tools, the lack of calibration can pose an electrocution hazard.

Thermometers and other temperature-regulating devices must be calibrated, or you risk working with uncontrolled temperatures. Medical labs should be especially wary of this, considering many specimens must be kept at certain temperatures to maintain quality. If you let equipment go so far down its lifetime without being recalibrated, it could even malfunction and cause injury.

Preventing injuries is the number one priority once you enter the lab space, and maintaining your equipment is one of these preventative measures. Now that we have explored what happens when you don’t calibrate your lab equipment, we hope you better understand why calibration is so important in the laboratory.

All these warnings also serve as a look into the benefits of calibration as well. For example, this process helps you ensure accurate results, helps your laboratory stay certified and up-to-date with procedures, saves money on materials and equipment costs, and prevents accidents and injury. If you don’t already, we suggest starting regular inspections and checks of all your equipment.

Schedule calibration check-ins at regular intervals even before you see any measurement differences for preventing damage. And if you discover any damage to your equipment during your inspections, you can find adequate replacements here at USA Lab Equipment. : What Happens When You Don’t Calibrate Your Lab Equipment

Do thermometers get less accurate over time?

One of the most basic attributes of any thermometer is its accuracy. Inaccurate thermometers lead to misinformed decisions about cooking, health, manufacturing, or any other process involving critical temperatures and can lead to disastrous results, Small unobserved increases or decreases in temperature can actually have profound effects upon the growth of bacteria, the pliability of plastics, the interaction of chemicals, the safety of food, or the tenderness of meat.

And yet, unlike distance or volume, for example, that can be measured directly by a tape measure or a measuring cup, temperature is a measure of the average kinetic energy of the subatomic particles in an object and cannot be measured directly, Instead, thermometers measure temperature indirectly, by actually measuring other physical phenomena that change as temperature changes.

Things like Calibrating a Thermapen ONE with a Fluke 1595A Super Thermometer

  • the expansion or contraction of liquids in the case of mercury or alcohol thermometers
  • the expansion or contraction of metals in the case of dial thermometers
  • changes in the speed of the flow of electrons in the case of thermistor thermometers, like ThermoPop®
  • changes in the amplitude of voltage in the case of thermocouple thermometers, like Thermapen® ONE

More importantly, although we are interested in the temperature of the article or process we are measuring, the thermometer is always measuring the temperature of itself, not the temperature of the surroundings, This temperature represents the temperature of the surrounds if the thermometer is in thermal equilibrium with the surroundings.

For example, when people use an old candy thermometer to measure the candy stage of boiled sugar/water mixture, the thing being measured by the thermometer is the expansion of the red-died alcohol in the glass tube after the bulb of the tube is placed in the boiling sugar mixture, not the expansion of the sugar mixture itself.

Thermistor thermometers measure the increase or decrease in resistance in the metal oxide semiconductor sheathed in their own probe tip. Thermocouple thermometers measure the increase or decrease in voltage in the alloyed metals inside their own probes.

  1. unlike tape measures or measuring cups, thermometers don’t measure temperature directly, they measure other physical phenomena that change when temperature changes
  2. and thermometers don’t actually measure those physical changes in the material being measured, they measure them inside their own systems when exposed to the material being measured.

ThermoWorks A2LA-Accredited Calibration Laboratory and its trained staff at ThermoWorks headquarters in Utah Because thermometers are not measuring temperature directly in this way, determining their accuracy and tracking their continued performance over time present unique challenges,

The markings on your tape measure or measuring cup don’t change over time, but thermometers can actually lose their accuracy over time, This potential for instruments to lose accuracy over time is sometimes called “drift,” because the relationship between the system of the thermometer and the actual properties of the material being measured can “drift” away from each other.

Drift in thermometers necessitates periodic re-checks or “calibration.” Read more about what affects the accuracy of thermometers below

What happens if a thermometer is not calibrated?

Some of our customers tell us that they needed to explain the importance of calibration to other parts of their business. With this in mind, we’ve compiled 10 risks which make most successful organisations consider calibration as essential. – Find out about Tempcon’s calibration services,1. Safety This is particularly relevant when considering food preparation and storage. Equipment that is not calibrated correctly can lead to food being stored at inappropriate temperatures (Leading to bacterial growth) or inadequate cooking temperatures for high risk foods (Leading to Food Poisoning).2. Loss of Reputation Bad news tends to circulate faster than good news and it doesn’t take long to damage a reputation that may have taken years to build. Corrective action is essential but preventative action becomes possible through a proper calibration programme.3. Waste Whether it’s throwing out food that’s spoiled or disposing of product that hasn’t been manufactured correctly (perhaps under cured or over cured), there’s no question that non-calibrated equipment increases the risk of unnecessary waste.4. Increased Costs Unnecessary Waste means unnecessary costs. That’s before you consider unnecessary energy consumption caused by overheating or over-chilling or the need to investigate quality issues caused by improper temperature control in production and manufacturing processes.5. Quality Improper temperature control in production and manufacturing processes can lead to quality issues for the finished product. Plastic casings that fatigued early and food products that weren’t adequately sterilised due to incorrect temperatures are just a couple of customer examples that could have been avoided through having the necessary equipment calibrated on a regular basis.6. Dissatisfied Customers Poor Quality and Missed Deliveries rarely make for happy customers! 7. Loss of Business Poor Product Quality, Disappointed Customers, Increased Costs and Loss of Reputation all add up to a Loss of Business 8. Increased Downtime If poor product quality is the first sign that equipment is in need of maintenance then remedial action becomes the only option. This can result in a line being taken out of action whilst necessary repairs are made. A regular calibration programme helps to show up any drift in equipment performance enabling maintenance to be planned and disruption minimised.9. Lower Profits Waste is a real profit killer. Many businesses focus on reducing inefficiencies (Wasted materials, resources and time). Often, the emphasis is placed on staff, processes and equipment capability with equipment efficiencies and inaccuracies not considered. Poor product quality will ultimately affect sales and could even results in a product recall. A routine calibration programme assures you that your equipment is measuring correctly and enables you to take necessary steps if it isn’t.10. Litigation and Fines In the UK: The Consumer Protection Act 1987 states that a retailer must sell products free from bacteria which could cause food poisoning. Improper temperature control of food could result in a negligence claim, ensuring that equipment is measuring accurately at least ensures that a business has the tools necessary. Of course food is only one area where a business is open to litigation. More information about Tempcon’s services >>here,